United Kingdom Korean War Casualties

Do not stand at my grave and weep
  I am not there. I do not sleep.
  I am the thousand winds that blow.
  I am the diamond glints on snow.
   I am the sunlight on ripened grain.
  I am the gentle autumn rain.
       When you awaken in the morning's hush
  I am the swift uplifting rush
  Of quiet birds in circled flight.
     I am the soft star that shine at night.
     Do not stand at my grave and cry;
    I am not there.
   I did not die.

Anonymous
 

JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000           50th ANNIVERSARY YEARS       27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

 

Able Seaman J.D. MAWDSLEY 19 Royal Navy HMS Jamaica 08 July 1950
Sergeant B. FINCH 25 1 Middlesex att HMS Jamaica               08 July 1950
Corporal S.G. LONG 20 1 Middlesex att HMS Jamaica            08 July 1950
Gunner R.J. BARWICK 25 Royal Artillery att HMS Jamaica   08 July 1950
Gunner K. JEPSON 21 Royal Artillery att HMS Jamaica          08 July 1950
Sergeant F.T. MERSH 27 Royal Artillery att HMS Jamaica      08 July 1950
Mr C. BUCKLEY OBE 45 War Corr. Daily Telegraph              12 Aug 1950
Mr I. MORRISON 37 War Corr. The Times                               12 Aug 1950
Ldg Stoker Mech. J.W. ADDISON - Royal Navy HMS Comus   23 Aug 1950
Lt. Cdr I.M. MacLACHLAN 29 R.N. HMS Triumph C 800 Sqn 29 Aug 1950
  Captain C.N.A, BUCHANAN 23  1 A&SH                                06 Sept. 1950
  Private T. TAYLOR 21 1 A&SH                                               06 Sept. 1950
   Private R. STREETER 19 1 Middlesex                                    08 Sept. 1950
 

FIRST BRITISH CASUALTIES

The first British casualties in the Korean fighting have been
announced. One sailor and five soldiers lost their lives and two
sailors and a soldier were wounded when a shell from the Korean
coast hit the 8,000-ton Fiji class cruiser Jamaica. The next of kin
have been informed. The cruiser was undamaged.

Those killed were: John Mawdsley, Able Seaman; Bertram Finch,
Sergeant, 1st. Battalion, Middlesex Regiment; Ralph Barwick, Lance
Bombardier, Royal Artillery; Stanley Long, Corporal, 1st Battalion,
Middlesex Regiment; and K. Jepson, Gunner, Royal Artillery.
F.T. Mersh, Sergeant, Royal Artillery, died of wounds.

Wounded, on the danger list, H.J. Chisholm, Private, The Cameron
Highlanders. Wounded, on the serious list, James Stewart, Able
Seaman; John Carr, Able Seaman.

It is likely that the soldiers were taken on board for a cruise before
the Korean fighting broke out and could not be landed.

 © The Times, 10th. July 1950


TWO CORRESPONDENTS KILLED

We announce with deep regret the deaths at the front in Korea on
Saturday of Mr. lan Morrison, our special correspondent there, and
of Mr. Christopher Buckley, special correspondent of the Daily
Telegraph. We also announce with regret the death, at the same time,
of Colonel  Nayar, one of the Indian members of the United
Nations Commission on Korea.

© The Times, 14th August 1950


TWO WAR REPORTERS KILLED

From Our Own Correspondent, Tokyo, August 13 - Mr. Morrison,
Mr. Buckley, and Colonel Unni Nayar were killed when a jeep in
which they were travelling struck a land mine on a road north of
Waegwan in the South Korean Army sector of the front.
Mr. Morrison, Colonel Nayar and a Korean officer who was with
them were killed instantly. Mr. Buckley died soon afterwards.
Mr. Morrison and Mr. Buckley were buried with military honours
in a Presbyterian cemetery on a quiet shady hill near Taegu to-day.
Twenty-five correspondents, of whom 12 acted as pall bearers were
present. Two American Presbyterian missionaries and an American
army chaplain took part in the service. The body of Colonel Nayar
was cremated in accordance with Hindu custom and the ashes will
be flown to India.
The deaths of Mr. Morrison and Mr. Buckley bring to 12 the number
of correspondents killed or missing in the Korea conflict.

© The Times, 14th August 1950



COMMANDO UNIT TO FLY TO KOREA

The Admiralty yesterday issued the following statement:

"A small Royal Marine Commando Unit under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel D.B. Drysdale, R.M., is being formed for very early dispatch by air to the Far East for service in Korea. This is in addition to the Royal Marine Commando Brigade in Malaya, which
will continue operations. For reasons of operational security, it is not desirable to publicise the size and composition, or the times of departure and arrival of this unit."

Lieutenant-Colonel Drysdale, M.B.E., R.M., who is 33, joined the
battle cruiser Renown at the outbreak of war and subsequently served
as a Captain with 101 R.M. Brigade. In 1943 he was appointed
Brigade Major to the Third Commando Brigade in Burma. Two years
later he was appointed to the command of 44 Commando. Promoted
Major in December, 1949, he became chief instructor at the R.M.
Officers' School at Plymouth last January.

© The Times, 22nd August 1950


BRITISH BATTALIONS PREPARING

ARGYLLS AND MIDDLESEX

From Our Correspondent - The Hong Kong Government released the
news of the early dispatch of the infantry from Hong Kong to Korea
early this morning. The two battalions preparing for Korea are the I st
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and the I st Middlesex Regiment,
which will be replaced within a fortnight by the I st Wiltshire
Regiment from the United Kingdom and by Ghurkhas and an armoured
car squadron from Malaya.
The I sty Middlesex played a notable part in the defence of Hong Kong
after Pearl Harbour. The force will be commanded by Brigadier B.A.
Coad, who is now in the colony and will go to Korea as soon as ship-
ping is available, probably next week.

©  The Times, 22ndAugust 1950


ROYAL NAVY RATING KILLED

The Admiralty announced yesterday that the destroyer Comus
(Lieutenant-Commander Hennessy) had been attacked by enemy
aircraft in Korean waters. One rating had been killed*. Damage
sustained by the Comus was not serious.

©  The Times, 24th August 1950

This would be Leading Stoker Mechanic J W. Addison who was
killed on 23rd August, 1950. -Peter Fisher



BRITISH TROOPS LAND

United States Army Headquarters, Korea - Two battalions of British
troops landed in Korea on Tuesday from a British carrier.
The carrier, bringing from Hong Kong the veteran first battalions of
the Argyll and Sutherland and Middlesex Regiments, tied up at a
Korean port a few minutes after noon on Tuesday.
-
©  Associated Press The Times, 29th August 1950

- 4 -

§

13th. September 1950 to 12th. December 1950


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000            50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS       27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Private T. CLARKE 19 A.C.C. att 1 A&SH 16 September 1950
Private A.R. LORIMER 22 1 A&SH 18 September 1950
2nd Lieutenant J. C. BUCKNALL 22 1 Middlesex 20 September 1950
Private B.J. BRISTOW 19 1 Middlesex 21 September 1950
Private K.C. TREDGET 19 1 Middlesex 21 September 1950
Private F.G. HAYFIELD 21 1 Middlesex 22 September 1950
Private D.C. RUSSELL 19 1 Middlesex 22 September 1950
Private E.D. WEST 19 1 Middlesex 22 September 1950
2nd Lieutenant G.A. WHITE 22 R.A.0.C. att 1 Middlesex 22 September 1950
Corporal C.W.F. BEARNE 19 Royal Signals HQ 27 Brg 22 September 1950
Pnvate A. ANNAN 19 K.O.S.B. att 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Private E.B. BARCLAY 19 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Private P.S. BOATMAN 19 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
2nd Lieutenant M.D.W. BUCHANAN 21 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Private J. COWAN 23 1A&SH 23 September 1950
Private M. DEMPSEY 21 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Lance Corporal A. FIELDING 22 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Private T.G. HILL 19 K.O.S.B. att 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Pnvate A.H.F. HOLMES 26 K.O.S.B. art 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Private C. HOWCROFT 22 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Private A. McKELVIE 28 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Private EM. McLAUGHLIN 22 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Major K. MUIR VC 38 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
 


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000          50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS          27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Sergeant E. PIGG 23 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Corporal R. WHITTINGTON 23 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Private W.B. WOOD 22 1 A&SH 23 September 1950
Gunner R.J. MITCHELL 19 Royal Artillery A Indep A/Tk Tp 23 September 1950
Ord. Seaman R.A.J. GODSALL 18 Royal Navy HMS Jamaica 23 September 1950
Private J. SHARPE 19 South Staffs att 1 Middlesex 23 September 1950
Craftsman G.R. CATCHPOLE 20 R.E.M.E. 11 Infantry Wksps 25 September 1950
Corporal J.W. PENTONY 21 1 Middlesex 26 September 1950
Corporal R. LEYLAND South Staffs att 1 Middlesex 01 October 1950
Private V. COLES 21 Royal Leicestershires att 1 A&SH 02 October 1950
Marine PR. JONES   Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 02 October 1950
Private C.B. COLEMAN 36 R.A.M.C. 26 Field Ambulance 02 October 1950
Corporal R.B. BABB 27 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 07 October 1950
Marine K.D. HITCHMAN 19 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 16 October 1950
Private R. KINNE 22 1 A&SH 17 October 1950
Private H. BAILEY 28 Royal Leicestershires att 1 A&SH 17 October 1950
Private C. McHARDY 22 1 A&SH 21 October 1950
Sapper P.J. BREEN 21 Royal Engineers 22 October 1950
Lance Corporal D.F. ALLAN 21 1 A&SH 22 October 1950
Major I.D.Mc.N. REITH 32 1 A&SH 27 October 1950
Private R. BOTTEN 19 1 Middlesex 27 October 1950
Private C.E. COLLIER 19 1 Middlesex 27 October 1950
Private D.O. PAGE 22 1 Middlesex 27 October 1950


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000           50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS          27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Corporal J. M. RUDGE 30 Royal Signals HQ 27 Brigade 27 October 1950
Lieutenant G. SANDER 25 1 Middlesex 30 October 1950
Private AM. IRELAND 28 K.S.L.I. att 1 Middlesex 04 November 1950
Sergeant H. CLARKE 23 1 A&SH 05 November 1950
Private J.D. FOSTER 20 1 A&SH 05 November 1950
Private G. GORDON 19 1 A&SH 05 November 1950
Private J. LIVINGSTONE 19 1 A&SH 05 November 1950
Lance Corporal R.C. STARK 22 1 A&SH 05 November 1950
Private R. KEMP 20 K.O.S.B. att 1 A&SH 05 November 1950
L/Corporal G.B. HARRISON 23 R.A.0.C. 29 Indep Inf Brg Ord Fld Pk 13 November 1950
S/Sergeant A. LESLIE 28 R.E.M.E.5 Medium Heavy Wksp 18 November 1950
Private R. DWYER 32 1 Glosters 25 November 1950
Lance Corporal G.H. LAWRENCE 31 1 Glosters 25 November 1950
Lance Corporal C.R. CRUIKSHANKS 32 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 27 November 1950
Corporal J.D. GIBSON 36 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 29 November 1950
Corporal J.E. BELSEY 23 Royal Marines, 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Sergeant R.G. DAVIES 27 Royal Marines, 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Marine 1. GARNER 18 Royal Marines, 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Marine J.L. GRAHAM 18 Royal Marines, 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Marine W.L.J. JAUNCEY 26 Royal Marines, 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Marine J. McCOURT 20 Royal Marines, 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
 


 .JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000            50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS             27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Capt R.N. PARKINSON-CUMINE MC 29 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Corporal R. SOUTHWORTH 22 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Marine E. STRAIN 26 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Marine D.W. STRAY 23 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Corporal C.E. TROTT 21 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Marine W.A. WALKER 22 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Marine R. WOOLDRIDGE 18 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Surgeon Lieut. D.A. KNOCK 27 R.N. art R.M. 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
Petty Officer J.A. TATE 26 RN. att R.M. 41 Indep. Commando 29 November 1950
2nd Lieutenant J. M. LOCK 22 R.A.0.C. att 1 Middlesex 29 November 1950
Private W.H. FREAKLEY 20 1 Middlesex 30 November 1950
Fusilier A.R. BROWNE 31 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 30 November 1950
Fusilier C.F. GAVILLET 32 1Royal Northumberland Fus. 30 November 1950
Corporal T.W. MARTIN 29 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 30 November 1950
Fusilier J.W. PHILLIPS 29 1Royal Northumberland Fus. 30 November 1950
Corporal D. THIRKETTLE 22 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 30 November 1950
Ldg Sickbay Att. D. RAINE - R.N. Hosp. Staff att R.M. 41 Indep Cdo 02 December 1950
Sergeant A.E.A. LALLEY 40 Royal Signals art 45 Field Regt R.A. 06 December 1950
Lieutenant J.R. O'BRIEN 22 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 08 December 1950
Private S.H. LAW 28 1 Glosters                                                     10 December 1950
Private J.R. WYLIE 30 1 Glosters                                                    12 December 1950

FIRST BRITISH SOLDIER KILLED IN KOREA

The War Office announced yesterday that the first British soldier to
be killed in the Korean war was Private Reginald Streeter, aged 19,
Ist Battalion, The Middlesex Regiment, of Stoughton, Guildford,
Surrey.

© The Times, ]4th September 1950


FAR EAST CASUALTIES

The War Office issues the following statement of casualties in Korea
to date:

Officers - WOUNDED - 2nd Lieutenant E. Hunter, Black Watch art
Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders; Lieutenant G. Lloyd-Davies,
R.A.0.C. art Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders.

MISSING - Captain C.N.A. Buchanan, Argyll & Sutherland
Highlanders.

Other Ranks - THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT - KILLED -
Private R. Strecter.

WOUNDED - Lance Corporal L.W. Dench, Corporal W.G. LeFevre,
Private J. Pritchard, Corporal C.B. Wagnen

THE ARGYLL & SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS -
WOUNDED - Private C. Bathgate, The King's Own Scottish Borders
art Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders; Private W. Calder; Private
W.C. Fytle; Private G. Grant; Private D. Gilks, Leicesters art Argyll
& Sutherland Highlanders; Private D. Kelly, Leicesters art Argyll &
Sutherland Highlanders; Corporal J.F. Layton; Sergeant T. Murray;
Private J. Mutch; Private W.R. Sutherland; Sergeant A. Walker.

© The Times, ]6th September 1950


FAR EAST CASUALTIES

The War Office announces the following casualties occurring on
operations in Korea between September 16 and September 22:

Other Ranks - THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT - WOLINDED -
Private D.O. Galvin.

THE ARGYLL & SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS - KILLED -
Private P. Clarke, Army Catering Corps art Argyll & Sutherland
Highlanders; Private A.R. Lorimer.

WOUNDED - Private D. Fraser; Private P. Maguire; Lance Corporal
Nee; Private B. Paton; Private W. Welsh; Private R.H. Woodburn,
Leicesters art Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders.

MISSING - Private T. Taylor.

© The Times, 23rd September 1950


FRIENDLY FIRE INCIDENT IN KOREA

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, September 24 - A tragic
error occurred yesterday when the British 27th Brigade, checked on
one side of a hill in an advance towards Songju, in the southern
beachhead, by heavy enemy fire from the opposite side of the hill,
called for aircraft to clear a way for it. Fifth Air Force aircraft quickly responded, but they picked the wrong side of the hill and
attacked by rockets, jellied petrol bombs, fragmentation bombs, and
machine-gun fire. The British lost about 60 men killed, wounded or
missing.
A Press photographer who saw the incident from a command post
about 400 yards away put aside his camera, after taking a number of
pictures, to help carry the litters of wounded back across the Naktong
river. He reported that while he was helping to carry a wounded
soldier across the river the Communists opened fire on a litter column
with a 76mm self-propelled gun. He added that one soldier who had
been wounded in the air attack was killed by shrapnel as he reached
the east bank of the river.
The Fifth Air Force immediately began an investigation of the
incident.

© The Times, 25th September 1950


ACCIDENTAL ATTACK ON BRITISH

U.S. MINISTER'S MESSAGE

A War Office spokesman said last night that casualties among the
men of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders who were mistakenly
attacked on Saturday by American aircraft are believed to be fewer
than was originally estimated. Next of kin of the killed and wounded
might be informed to-day, he said.

The following message was sent to the Prime Minister at 10,
Downing Street on Saturday night by Mr. Julius Holmes, the United
States Minister in Charge of Affairs in London:

"I have been informed of reports that casualties have been suffered
by United Kingdom forces in Korea as the result of a tragic mistake
in identity by their United States air support. Although we know
that such cruel accidents are not always avoidable in the heat of
battle, 1 want to express to you and the British people the deep sense
of sorrow of the United States Government and people over this
tragedy. All America joins me in the deepest sympathy for the
bereaved families of your gallant soldiers."

© The Times, 25th September 1950


"PILOTS NOT HELD AT FAULT"

Taegu, September 25 - The pilots of the American Mustang aircraft
who carried out the accidental attack on British troops near Songju
are not being held at fault, a spokesman stated here to-day. They
bombed troops on the position after ground controllers were said to
have stated over the radio that there were no British troops west of
the Songju road at this point. In fact, the Argyll and Sutherland
Highlanders were there, having dislodged the Communists from the
hill during the morning.

An observation aircraft got the green light for attack from American
ground control in the British sector. There also was confusion about
the colour of the identification panels.

The attack was launched, but the airborne controller stopped it when
it became doubtful whether the troops being attacked were North
Koreans. -
© Reuter

The Times, 25th September 1950

 


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000            50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS            27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Private K.J. PARTIS 29 1 Glosters 24 December 1950
Gunner J. MURPHY 39 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 24 December 1950
Private R. STANNARD 19 R.A.0.C. att 27 Infantry Brigade 24 December 1950
Private R. REED 23 R.E.M.E. 23 Heavy Recovery Sec. 01 January 1951
Private H. ARNO 30 E. Yorks att 1 R.N.F. 03 January 1951
Corporal C. BAILEY 22 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Sergeant J. BATES 38 1Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Fusilier J.W. BATEY 31 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Fusilier J.W. CANNON 24 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Fusilier R.V CUE 29 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Fusilier F.W.A. FAIL 25 1Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Lieutenant G.M. FITZ-GIBBON 22 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Fusilier R.E.S. JACKSON 29 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Fusilier T.H. MENALLY 30 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Major C.C.G. MILWARD 42 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Fusilier E.W. ROOMES 26 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Fusilier J.A. SEAMAN 27 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Lance Corporal C. SHARPE 30 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Sergeant J.H. WILLIAMSON 35 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 January 1951
Corporal W ADAIR 31 1 Royal Ulster Rifles          03 January 1951
Rifleman W. I.. ASHTON 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles  03 January 1951
Rifleman D.S. AUSTIN 21 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951
Major C.A.H.B. BLAKE 39 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951
Rifleman W.O. DAVIES 32 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951
Rifleman J. DONNELLY 21 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000            50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS              27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Rifleman M. FOSTER 40 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951
Rifleman T. KENNEDY 25 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951
Corporal W.J. McCONNELL 28 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951;
Rifleman R.J. McCORMICK 22 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951
Rifleman S.F. PLANT 29 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951
2nd Lieut. G.V.B. PRESCOTT-WESTCAR 21 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951
Rifleman J. RAINEY 26 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951
Rifleman C. RAMSAY 20 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951
Corporal A. TURNER 31 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 03 January 1951
Lieutenant C.G. ALEXANDER 22 8th Hussars HQ Sqn Recce † 03 January 1951
Captain D.L. ASTLEY-COOPER 30 8th Hussars HQ Sqn Recce † 03 January 1951
Sergeant E. R. COLLINGS 28 8th Hussars HQ Sqn Recce † 03 January 1951
Private P.J. SMALLSHAW 32 Army Catering Corps att 1 RNF 03 January 1951
Gunner R. ENGLAND 29 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 03 January 1951
Captain R.D. FLEMING 28 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 03 January 1951
Gunner S. FOY 29 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 03 January 1951
Captain W.M. HOLMAN MBE 29 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 03 January 1951
Gunner L.G. TAPLIN 30 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 03 January 1951
Gunner L. WRIGHT 23 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 03 January 1951
Gunner G. YATES 30 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 03 January 1951
Sergeant D. JACKSON 36 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 04 January 1951
Corporal A. McINTOSH 27 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 04 January 1951
† Cooper Force Recce Troop


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000             50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS           27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Rifleman M.B. BUNBY 36 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman H.W. GARNER 32 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman S. HEELEY 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman D.H. JOHNSTON 28 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Lance Corporal A. KING 27 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman R.J. McCAIN 36 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman R.J. McCRACKEN 31 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Corporal P. McGEOGHEGAN 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman M. McSHERRY 31 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Corporal W.A. MOORE MM 35 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman C.C. MURRAY 21 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman J.W. MURRAY 34 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman A.J. NEWMAN 27 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman T. OSTLE 29 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Corporal E. WHEELER 28 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman W. WILCOX 29 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman W.J. WOODHOUSE 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Rifleman T. WRIGHT 28 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Trooper J. COLLISON 21 8th Hussars HQ Sqn Recce † 04 January 1951
Gunner G. CAWOOD 22 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 04 January 1951
Gunner T. L. CURTISS 26 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 04 January 1951
Gmer N. GRAYSTON 28 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 04 January 1951
Gunner R. HARRISON 29 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 04 January 1951
Captain J. L. LANE 27 Royal Artillery 170 Mortar Battery 04 January 1951
† Cooper Force Recce Troop


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000          50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS      27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Private P.J. McDONNELL 40 A.C.C. att 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 January 1951
Fusilier H. PICKERING 29 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 05 January 1951
Lance Corporal F. DYTOR 25 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 05 January 1951
Rifleman S.F. ELLSMORE 31 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 05 January 1951
Rifleman J. SHANNON 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 05 January 1951
Gunner W.A. EDWARDS 30 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 05 January 1951
Rifleman B.N. HILL 24 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 06 January 1951
Marine L.A. HEARD 21 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 06 January 1951
Marine S.E.H. HILLS 35 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 06 January 1951
Captain C. HESKETH 30 R.E.M.E. 5 Medium Workshop 08 January 1951
Lieutenant L.H.St.C. REILLY 24 1 Middlesex 11 January 1951
Rifleman I. C.. BUSTARD 23 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 15 January 1951
Corporal I. HERON 30 Royal Norfolks 16 January 1951
Corporal E. McALEESE 22 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 23 January 1951
Lieutenant A.C BEAVAN 24 Royal Navy HMS Theseus 807 Sqn 26 January 1951
Pilot Officer R.E. BAKER 27 R.A.F. FEFBW 205 Squadron (Crew) 28 January 1951
Sergeant A.J. CARPENTER 25 R.A.F. FEFBW 205 Squadron (Crew) 28 January 1951
Flight Lieutenant D.R. HOBDEY 31 R.A.F. FEFBW 205 Squadron (Crew) 28 January 1951
Flight Sergeant R.F. HODGE 31 R.A.F. FEFBW 205 Squadron (Crew) 28 January 1951
Sergeant W. THOMPSON 28 R.A.F. FEFBW 205 Squadron (Crew) 28 January 1951
Flight Sergeant P.E.T. BROOKS 29 R.A.F. FEFBW 88 Sqn (passenger) 28 January 1951
L/Aircraftsman E.A. COOPER 20 R.A.F. FEFBW (205 Sqn ground crew) 28 January 1951
S/Aircraftsman R.C. CURTIS  R.A.F. FEFBW (205 Sqn ground crew) 28 January 1951
FEFBW - Far East Flying Boat Wing


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000        50th.  ANNIVERSARY YEARS       27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


L/Aircraftsman W.C. DAURIS 21 R.A.F. FEFBW (205 Sqn ground crew) 28 January 1951
L/Aircraftsman J. GRACIE 19 R.A.F. FEFBW (205 Sqn ground crew) 28 January 1951
L/Aircraftsman D.E. HUMPHRYS 20 R.A.F. FEFBW (205 Sqn grd crew) 28 January 1951
S/Aircraftsman A.J. KENT 21 R.A.F. FEFBW (205 Sqn ground crew) 28 January 1951
L/Aircraftsman P.C. McALLISTER 21 R.A.F. FEFBW (205 Sqn grd crew) 28 January 1951
L/Aircraftsman J. S. OLLEY 22 R.A.F. FEFBW (205 Sqn ground crew) 28 January 1951
Marine R.J. NEEDS I8 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 30 January 1951
Rifleman T. WHITE 29 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 02 February 1951
Gunner R.B. NEWMAN 29 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 07 February 1951
Gunner  J.T. NUTMAN 29 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 07 February 1951
Lieutenant D.F.P.C. PROBYN 24 3rd att 8th Hussars HQ Sqn Recce † 08 February 1951
Private E. CROWSON 29 1 Glosters 13 February 1951
Private T.J. KELLY 29 1 Glosters 13 February 1951
Lance Corporal G. SPUFFARD 29 1 Glosters 13 February 1951
Petty Officer Amn. J.F. WIGLEY 29 Royal Navy HMS Thescus 14 February 1951
Private D. CASON 30 1 Glosters 15 February 1951
Private G.R. MINTON 19 K.S.L.I. att. 1 Middlesex 15 February 1951
Private D.P. PITT 19 K.S.L.I. att. 1 Middlesex 15 February 1951
Private R.A.J. BENNETT 19 1 Middlesex 15 February 1951
Private W.P. CARROLL 21 1 Middlesex 1 5 February 1951
Private G.F. HARRIS 19 1 Middlesex 15 February 1951
Sergeant D.B. HUMMERSTONE 24 1 Middlesex 15 February 1951
Corporal R. PEGG 21 1 Middlesex 15 February 1951
Private G. ELLSON 34 Middlesex att 1 Glosters 15 February 1951
 † Cooper Force Recce Troop
FEFBW = Far East Flying Boat Wing


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000         50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS          27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Private C.E. BAILEY 32 1 Glosters 16 February 1951
Private M.R.E. BURTON 22 1 Glosters 16 February 1951
Private G. DAVIES 28 1 Glosters 16 February 1951
Corporal A. HERRALL 31 1 Glosters 16 February 1951
Corporal R.E. JONES 21 1 Glosters 16 February 1951
Private W.G. TYLER 29 1 Glosters 16 February 1951
Private K.F. WILLIAMS 29 1 Glosters 16 February 1951
Lieutenant D.A. SIMCOX 23 Beds & Herts att 1 Glosters 16 February 1951
Gunner A.J. BALDOCK 29 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regiment 16 February 1951
Sergeant S.B. STREATHER 37 7 Royal Tank Regiment C Squadron 18 February 1951
Private J.D. HEWARD 21 Glosters att R.U.R. 19 February 1951
Rifleman J.T. DOYLE 21 1 Royal Ulster Pifies 19 February 1951
Rifleman J. O'GORMAN 21 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 19 February 1951
Captain N.A.M. BALDERS 28 Suffolks att 1 R.U.R. 20 February 1951
Private D.S. NICHOLLS 29 R.A.0.C. 1 Indep. Field Regiment 21 February 1951
Rifleman J. BUTCHER 31 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 22 February 1951
Rifleman P. McCURRIE 34 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 26 February 1951
Gunner G.W. NAYLOR 20 Royal Artillery 11 LAA Battery 01 March 1951
Corporal D.H. PATTERSON 24 1 A&SH 04 March 1951
Corporal C.R.B. HILL 22 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 04 March 1951
Rifleman W. SUTTON 33 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 11 March 1951
Fl. Lieut. D.W. GUY 27 R.A.F. att HMS Theseus 810 Sqdn. 13 March 1951
Lieutenant G.H. COOLES 27 Royal Navy HMS Theseus 810 Sqdn. 13 March 1951

GALLANTRY IN KOREA

D.S.O. FOR TWO OFFICERS OF 27TH BRIGADE

The King has approved the awards of The Distinguished Service
Order in recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Korea to
Lieutenant-Colonel A.M. Man, O.B.E., The Middlesex Regiment
(Duke of Cambridge's Own), of Bumham, Buckinghamshire, and
Lieutenant-Colonel G.L. Neilson, The Argyll and Sutherland
Highlanders (Princess Louis's), of Colinton, Edinburgh.
On September 21, 1950, the 27th British Brigade had been relieved
in the line by an American battalion and was moving up to a
concentration area before crossing the Naktong river. An American
reconnaissance unit across the river had encountered heavy resistance
and was in a precarious state, and Lieutenant-Colonel Man was
ordered to cross the river to support it. There was no way over but a
foot-bridge, which would take men only in single file.
The attack was entirely successful, in spite of the fact that the objec-
tive was on top of a cliff which took an hour to climb and was heavily
defended by machine guns, while all approaches were under heavy
mortar and artillery fire. Throughout the action, Lieutenant-Colonel
Man was in a forward observation post controlling the supporting fire.
His control of the battle at all times was complete, and his coolness
and disregard of his own safety under heavy mortar and self-propelled
artillery fire was a fine example to his battalion.
By the evening of September 21, the 1st Battalion, The Argyll and
Sutherland Highlanders, had crossed the river by foot-bridge under
intermittent shell fire. Next day Lieutenant-Colonel Neilson was
ordered to capture a high feature. As a firm base, he ordered a
company to seize a lower feature, which was secured. He was then
counter-attacked by about 200 enemy, and the position became
precarious. Artillery support was withdrawn without warning to the
brigade commander or battalion commander. An air strike was asked
for which came unfortunately on the part of the hill the battalion
held, instead of on the area for counter-attack. What was left of the
battalion, two companies, withdrew after the air strike, but counter-
attacked and regained the ridge, although only about 30 all ranks
remained. They were eventually driven back to the reserve company
area, which they held firm. Lieutenant-Colonel Neilson was well
forward controlling the battle and his coolness was a great inspiration
to officers and other ranks. His planning for the operation showed
great appreciation and skill. It was entirely due to him that the feature
148 was secured, and his initiative in reorganizing his battalion under
heavy fire was beyond praise.

©
The Times, 13th December 1950


KOREA CASUALTIES

COMMANDO LOSSES

The Admiralty regret to announce the following casualties suffered
by 41 Independent Commando, Royal Marines, during operations
with United Nations forces in North-Eastern Korea, additional to
those announced on December 7.

ROYAL MARINES - Other Ranks - WOUNDED - Sergeant L.F.J.
Dickens; Marine A.H. Harper, Marine W.G. Irish, Marine G. King,
Marine J. Pepper, Marine S.P. Perkins, Marine E. Stock.

The following amendments have been made to the original casualty
list (all personnel previously reported missing):

ROYAL NAVY - Officer - KILLED - Surgeon Lieutenant D.A.
Knock.

ROYAL MARINES - Other Ranks - KILLED - Marine W.L.
Jauncey, Marine E. Strain, Corporal C.E. Trott, Marine W.A. Walker.

WOUNDED - Marine R.E. Fellows, Corporal K.J.T. Williams.
©  The Times, 14th December 1950

KEY ROLE FOR BRITISH IN
SEOUL DEFENCE PLAN

From Eric Downton, Daily Telegraph Special Correspondent,
Seoul, Monday - The 27th British Commonwealth Brigade and the
British 29th Brigade will, it seems, have an important role in the
defence of the Seoul area if Communist forces attack the South
Korean capital. Both brigades are in positions in the snow-mantled
hills north of the city.
During darkness Communist partisans move through the desolate
streets and bleak ruins, attacking anti-Communists. Murders are
perpetrated by these bands almost every night. The sound of shooting
is commonplace between sunset and dawn.
The Communists, it is believed, have a well-organised fifth column
in the city waiting for a chance to strike at the defenders' backs.
Guards on strategic buildings, road junctions, bridges, railway stations
and other key points have been strengthened. Artillery covers the
main approaches.

STRICT CURFEW
Such troops as have to move after dark do so in groups with arms at
the ready. Curfew is strictly enforced. Civilians remain indoors behind
barred doors and windows.
The Korean Government has given its police and army extensive
emergency powers. Able-bodied men are being called up for the
militia.

© The Daily Telegraph, ]9th December 1950


NAVAL GUNS KEEP
ESCAPE ROUTE OPEN

From R. W Thompson, Daily Telegraph Special Correspondent,
General MacArthur's H. Q., Tokyo, Tuesday Morning
- The American
heavy cruisers Rochester, 13,700 tons, and St. Paul, 13,600 tons,
supported by destroyers, are ringing the Hungnam beachhead in
North-East Korea with a continuous curtain of high explosive to hold
open an escape route for the United Nations Forces. Enemy pressure
against the beachhead continues.
The western front is almost wholly quiet, with minor patrol clashes
above and below the 38th Parallel. It is now admitted that widespread
guerrilla attacks against communications are fully co-ordinated under
North Korean generals.
United Nations air attacks, pressed throughout a day of fine weather,
were concentrated particularly against the areas of the ports of
Chinnampo and Wonsan. Australian pilots reported considerable
enemy concentration along the 39th Parallel.
An F-86 Sabre, America's fastest jet fighter, brought down in flames
an M.I.G.-15 jet near the Manchurian border It was the Sabre's first
battle test.


MISSOURI JOINS IN

The American battleship Missouri, 45,000 tons, arrived off the port
of Hungnam yesterday to join naval forces protecting the United
Nations beachhead, said British United Press. Her 16in guns opened
fire on Communists attacking the beachhead. -
© British United Press

The Daily Telegraph, 19th December 1950


25a WOUNDED - Marine R.E. Fellows, Corporal K.J.T. Williams.
©  The Times, 14th December 1950

KEY ROLE FOR BRITISH IN
SEOUL DEFENCE PLAN

From Eric Downton, Daily Telegraph Special Correspondent,
Seoul, Monday - The 27th British Commonwealth Brigade and the
British 29th Brigade will, it seems, have an important role in the
defence of the Seoul area if Communist forces attack the South
Korean capital. Both brigades are in positions in the snow-mantled
hills north of the city.
During darkness Communist partisans move through the desolate
streets and bleak ruins, attacking anti-Communists. Murders are
perpetrated by these bands almost every night. The sound of shooting
is commonplace between sunset and dawn.
The Communists, it is believed, have a well-organised fifth column
in the city waiting for a chance to strike at the defenders' backs.
Guards on strategic buildings, road junctions, bridges, railway stations
and other key points have been strengthened. Artillery covers the
main approaches.

STRICT CURFEW
Such troops as have to move after dark do so in groups with arms at
the ready. Curfew is strictly enforced. Civilians remain indoors behind
barred doors and windows.
The Korean Government has given its police and army extensive
emergency powers. Able-bodied men are being called up for the
militia.

©  The Daily Telegraph, ]9th December 1950


NAVAL GUNS KEEP
ESCAPE ROUTE OPEN

From R. W Thompson, Daily Telegraph Special Correspondent,
General MacArthur's H. Q., Tokyo, Tuesday Morning - The American
heavy cruisers Rochester, 13,700 tons, and St. Paul, 13,600 tons,
supported by destroyers, are ringing the Hungnam beachhead in
North-East Korea with a continuous curtain of high explosive to hold
open an escape route for the United Nations Forces. Enemy pressure
against the beachhead continues.
The western front is almost wholly quiet, with minor patrol clashes
above and below the 38th Parallel. It is now admitted that widespread
guerrilla attacks against communications are fully co-ordinated under
North Korean generals.
United Nations air attacks, pressed throughout a day of fine weather,
were concentrated particularly against the areas of the ports of
Chinnampo and Wonsan. Australian pilots reported considerable
enemy concentration along the 39th Parallel.
An F-86 Sabre, America's fastest jet fighter, brought down in flames
an M.I.G.-15 jet near the Manchurian border It was the Sabre's first
battle test.


MISSOURI JOINS IN

The American battleship Missouri, 45,000 tons, arrived off the port
of Hungnam yesterday to join naval forces protecting the United
Nations beachhead, said British United Press. Her 16in guns opened
fire on Communists attacking the beachhead. -
©
British United Press

The Daily Telegraph, ]9th December 1950


25

  THREE BRITONS FREED BY COM M UNISTS

From Our Special Correspondent, With the British 29th Brigade,
Monday - Three British soldiers returned to the United Nations
lines to-day after being freed by North Koreans who held them
prisoners for 17 days. They are Lance Corporal Walter Marvin,
Private Harold Farx*, and Private Fred Binns, of the I st Battalion,
The Northumberland Fusiliers.
All three were captured on the night of November 30 during an
encounter with North Koreans at Sibyonni. They were released to-
day near positions held by the 27th British Commonwealth Brigade
north of Seoul and told the direction they should take to reach the
brigade's lines.
Three American and three South Korean soldiers were freed at the
same time. The party had suffered from exposure and from the effects
of marches on meagre rice rations.
According to reports so far they were not maltreated.
Mrs. Elsie Binns, of Avon-street, Middlesbrough, learned while
listing to the wireless last night that her son, Private Fred Binns, was
one of three British prisoners released by Communists in Korea. The
last letter she received from him was dated November 29th, the day
before he was captured. He was later posted as missing.

© *
This should have read, Fusilier Harold Farne. Peter Fisher


BRITISH HALT EXECUTIONS

17 OUT OF 40 SAVED

From Our Special Correspondent, With British Troops in Korea -
Wednesday - Seated at a camp fire in an ice-bound ravine north of
Seoul to-night, two officers of the 1 st Battalion, The Royal
Northumberland Fusiliers described how a few hours earlier they had
halted a mass execution by South Korean military police. The men
lined up were Korean political prisoners.
They were driven in lorries to a spot only a few hundred yards
from 29th Brigade H.Q. There they were made to dig a grave. The
commander of the unit in whose sector the Koreans had chosen the
execution ground, accompanied only by his second-in-command and
a Korean interpreter, hurried to the scene when he heard shots.
The firing squad of Korean military police, commanded by a
lieutenant, had already begun moving along the lines of kneeling
prisoners, shooting them in the back of the head. About 17 prisoners
were saved but 23 had already been executed.
The dead, lying in the common grave they had dug, included one
young woman. The firing squad returned to Seoul after a brief
argument with the interpreter, and British troops took the survivors
to a gaol in Seoul.
Action to halt the execution was taken on an emphatic order by
Brigadier Brodie, 29th Brigade commander, following the discovery
several days ago that Koreans were using the brigade area for an
execution ground. To-night, the brigadier said: "I am not going to
have people executed on my doorstep."

©  The Daily Telegraph, 2]st December 1950


BRITISH CASUALTIES IN KOREA

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

THE ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS - KILLED -
Corporal T.W. Martin, Corporal D. Thirkettle; Fusilier A.R. Brown,
Fusilier C.F. Gavillett, Fusilier J.W. Phillips.

WOUNDED - C.S.M. P.J. Reynolds; Sergeant J.W. Peters; Corporal J.
26a Hall; Fusilier G. Allan, Fusilier R. Jowett, Fusilier E. Naylor.

THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - WOUNDED -
Private R. Teare.

THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT - KILLED - Private W. Freakley.

WOUNDED - Sergeant D. Cranfield, Sergeant L.R. Jessup; Corporal
J. Conroy, Corporal J. Eldridge (Queen's att The Middlesex
Regiment), Corporal E.G. Millard; Lance Corporal L. Anderson,
Lance Corporal 0. Bonnywell, Lance Corporal R. Gardner, Lance
Corporal A.L. Halls, Lance Corporal T.W. Pritchard; Private B.O.H.
Brumpton, Private D.H. Craddock (K.S.L.I. att The Middlesex
Regiment), Private K.P. Cruikshank, Private D.D. Cruse, Private
Cuthbert (no initials), Private W.M. Garner, Private R.C. Goldup,
Private M.H. Goulding (K.S.L.I. art The Middlesex Regiment),
Private F. Harper (K.S.L.I. art The Middlesex Regiment), Private
G.W. Richardson, Private M.B. Sangwine, Private C. Shore (K.S.L.I.
art The Middlesex Regiment), Private W.H. Smallman, Private B.
Smillie, Private J.P. Stewart (K.S.L.I. art The Middlesex Regiment),
Private C. Stubbs, Private C. Taylor (K.S.L.I. att The Middlesex
Regiment), Private J.H. Vodden, Private B.G. Wamer, Private R.S.
Westeott, Private F.Y Williams, Private W.G.C. Woodruff, Private R.
Yarwood (K.S.L.I. att The Middlesex Regiment), Private N.S. Yates
(South Staffs. art The Middlesex Regiment).

THE ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - WOUNDED -
Rifleman E.W. Davis, Rifleman C. Hankinson.

Lieutenant J.A. Beekett, of The Lancashire Fusiliers, attached The
Royal Ulster Rifles, who was previously reported missing, is now
reported as having rejoined his unit.

THE ROYAL ARMY SERVICE CORPS - MISSING -
Lance Corporal R.H. Harris, Driver B. Gardner.

© The Times 23rd December 1950


INCHON PORT BLOWN UP AS
CHINESE PUSH ON

MAIN ALLIED FORCE RETREATING SOUTH

COMMUNISTS STRIKE TO SPLIT U.N. ARMIES

Under cover of naval gunfire United Nations forces last night with-
drew from the port of Inchon, 22 miles west of South Korea's fallen
capital, Seoul.
As they embarked in an armada of transports and chartered merchant
ships, Army engineers blew up the railway yards and dock facilities
along the waterfront.
Allied cruisers and destroyers, including British, Canadian and
Australian units, poured salvoes of shells on Chinese Communist
troops, thrusting west and south from Seoul.
Most of the United Nations forces taken off from Inchon were line-
of-communication troops and units detailed to guard the coastal
approaches to Seoul while the main Allied Army, after evacuating the
city, retreated south to a new defence line.
Seoul has now changed hands three times in six months.
Lieutenant-General Ridgway, U.N. Ground Forces Commander in
Korea, was at the front to direct the withdrawal.
This was covered by an Allied air onslaught in which every available
plane from bases in Korea and Japan as well as from aircraft carriers
lying offshore was thrown in.
To the east a Chinese Communist army reported to number 200,000
men continued to drive through the middle of Korea on the strategic
road centre of Wonju, threatening to cut in two all U.N. forces in the
country.
© The Daily Telegraph, 5th January 1951

- 26 -

 LAST BATTLE FOR SEOUL

BRITISH IN ACTION

From Erie Downton, Daily Telegraph Special Correspondent
Outside Seoul, Thursday
- The last United Nations troops left Seoul
this afternoon while Chinese and North Korean vanguards entered the
city from the North.
Demolition squads blew up pontoon bridges across the Han river
after the last infantry units had fled over. A dense shroud of smoke
now covers Seoul, rising from many large fires.
Kimpo airport, 11 miles northwest of the city, was abandoned
yesterday after extensive demolitions had been carried out. About
a quarter of a mile away from where I am writing this the hangars of
Seoul city airport are burning furiously.
The withdrawal from Seoul came suddenly. It was forced by a
Chinese attack in strength towards the city sooner than had been
expected.
Throughout yesterday and early to-day United Nations troops fought
a delaying action in the hills north of the city.
Fighting lasted about 24 hours on the two main sectors a few miles
north of Seoul - along the road from Kaesong and Uijongbu. The
British 29th Brigade took a leading part in the Kaesong road battle.

OUTFLANKED - FIGHTING WITHDRAWAL
This was the Brigade's first action since coming to Korea. They
fought with zest, but several times during the withdrawal were
outflanked by the ubiquitous Chinese.
The 29th, pulling back across the Han river, this morning were
followed soon after by the British 27th Commonwealth Brigade.
The last British unit to leave Seoul were the Argylls. With them was
Brigadier Coad.
Standing on one of the Han river bridges he directed the withdrawal
of his troops, some of whom were riding on American tanks.
I spent yesterday afternoon with the 29th Brigade. At that time the
Royal Northumberland Fusiliers were cleaning out two villages in a
narrow valley which had been occupied by the Chinese.
The infantry moved in, supported by tanks which operated with
difficulty across the rutted hill tracks.
Early in the day the Royal Ulster Rifles were pushed back, but later
they regained this ground. Whenever the Ulsters heard the Chinese
bugles - with which the enemy heralded their attacks - they replied
with bugle calls of their own.
The Chinese fought tenaciously. One Chinese prisoner blew up him-
self and an interrogating officer with a hand grenade he had concealed
under his quilted uniform.
During the night the Uisters had a difficult time. While pulling back
they were hit on both flanks. They are reported to have lost some tanks.

Elements of the battalion were cut off but later fought their way
back to the main body and escaped. American helicopters rescued
some British wounded from the front to-day.
Seoul last night was a lurid spectacle. Great fires raged in many
buildings. Explosions and demolitions shook the city.

© The Daily Telegraph, 5th January 1951


ESCAPE ROUTE THREAT

ENEMY DRIVE ON CENTRAL FRONT

From R. W Thompson, Daily Telegraph Special Correspondent,
Tokyo, Thursday
-An official announcement from G.H.Q. to-night
stated: "The city of Seoul has been successfully evacuated by all
United Nations troops who have withdrawn as planned to their next
defensive positions."
While enemy columns stream on Seoul by seven routes and through
the devastated city across the Han, U.N. forces are confined to two
roads as they fall back southward.
The British continue to fight in the rearguard.

An enemy threat to the western escape routes may be the key to the
whole pattern in the next 48 hours.
At any moment an outflanking move may develop, threatening all
troops in the north-western sector. Chungju, in the heart of South
Korea, is the natural next objective of this Chinese thrust.
Success would mean not only a dire threat to all U.N. forces in the
north-west, but in the words of an official bulletin: "It would also
enable the enemy to exploit the routes to the south through Cheehon,
Yonju and Andong to the main entry and supply port of Pusan."

©
The Daily Telegraph, 5th January 1951


GENERAL MARSHALL PRAISES BRITISH

U.N. FACE HEAVY ODDS

From Our Own Correspondent, Washington, Thursday - General
Marshall, United States Secretary of Defence, said to-day that the
situation in Korean was "developing almost exactly as we anticipated
and troops are being deployed to meet this anticipation." He praised
the "exceptional fighting" of the British and other troops.

©  The Daily Telegraph, 5th January 1951


CASUALTIES IN KOREA

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

STH HUSSARS - WOUNDED - Trooper B. Taylor.

THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - KILLED -
Private S.H. Law.

DIED OF WOUNDS - Private JR. Wylie.

WOUNDED - Private G. McCabe; Lance Corporal J. Davies.

THE ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - WOUNDED -
Rifleman H.W. Gales.

THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT - KILLED -
2nd Lieutenant J.0.M. Lock (R.A.0.C. art Middlesex Regiment).

THE ROYAL ARMY SERVICE CORPS - WOUNDED -
Driver W.J. Taylor.

RETURNED FROM MISSING - Lance Corporal R.N. Harris;
Driver B. Gardner. These two men were previously reported as
,missing' but have since rejoined their unit.

ROYAL ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEERS -
WOUNDED - Craftsman D.E. Squires.

©  The Times, 6th January 1951


CHINESE SWITCH DRIVE IN KOREA

THRUST BY 200,000 IN CENTRAL SECTOR

Chinese Communists in Korea yesterday switched their main
advance from the Seoul area to the central front. A force of about
200,000 attacked north of Wonju, an important junction from which
they could drive west in an attempt to cut off United Nations forces
south of Seoul.

- 27-

 Front-line reports said the Allies were resisting stubbornly north of
Wonju. They still held Hongchon, 25 miles farther north, which was
by-passed by the Communists. United Nations troops in action on the
east coast called for air support.
The Eighth Army, abandoning the Han River line, has pulled back
through Suwon, 18 miles south of Seoul. After visiting defence lines
now being consolidated, Lieutenant-General Ridgway, Eighth Army
commander, reported, "Everything fine up there."
About 1,000 Communists crossed the Han River to occupy Kimpo
airfield. An air observer reported that Seoul and the port of Inchon
were deserted.
Road traffic into Korea from Manchuria has trebled in the past few
days. Last night, 1,200 south-bound lorries were counted.

©
The Daily Telegraph, 6th Janua 1951


BRITISH BAYONET CHARGE

From Eric Downton, Daily Telegraph Special Correspondent,
With British Troops in Korea, Friday
- Wounded of the Royal Ulster
Rifles awaiting evacuation by air to Japan to-day described the night-
marish fighting in which they took part while covering the withdrawal
from Seoul. The engagement, involving two companies of infantry
with tank support, was probably the fiercest in which British troops in
Korea have been involved.
One veteran said that for him it had been "worse than Dunkirk."
The Uisters had been fighting all day on Wednesday since before
dawn with the 29th Brigade east of the Kaesong road, about eight
miles north of Seoul.
After dark came orders to withdraw towards the city. Then two com-
panies were cut off by Chinese and North Koreans. The Communists
surrounded them and attacked simultaneously from all sides.
The Chinese advanced blowing bugles and hems, and beating drums
and gongs. Before closing in for hand-to-hand combat they raked the
Ulsters with mortars, machine-guns and sub-machine-guns. The
Uisters exchanged fire, then fixed bayonets and charged.

TWELVE TANKS LOST
Churchills, Cromwells - All 12 tanks with the Ulsters were lost.
They included Churchills and Cromwells, but not Centurions. Bren
carriers and other vehicles were abandoned.
The tanks, whose action was severely limited by the narrow track
between steep hills, slippery with ice and snow, were trapped while
trying to withdraw in line. Communists knocked out the leading tanks
with mortar fire and grenades and halted the column, sometimes firing
at crews from only a few feet.
Orders were given to abandon the tanks and transport, and for the
crews to make their way out over the hills. When he jumped out of
his tank, one man landed on a Chinese. He bayoneted him and
scrambled up the slopes to join his comrades.

FIGHT IN DARK
Wounded Carried Out - After hours of combat in the dark, the
Ulsters formed up in single file. Revolver in hand, Major John Shaw
led them as they marched, carrying the wounded across hills. They
were guided by the fires blazing in Seoul.
Major Shaw passed word back that no one was to speak. Thus
they escaped the Communist trap. It took them four hours to cover
the eight miles to the outskirts of the city, where they joined other
units of the 29th Brigade and later withdrew south across the Han
River.
During the engagement the Ulsters rescued two wounded Royal
Northumberland Fusiliers who had been taken prisoner. They sur-
prised and killed the Chinese guarding them. The Ulsters were
compelled to leave some of their wounded.
Later after daybreak two American helicopters carried out daring
rescues of several of the wounded from behind the Communist lines.

On one trip a helicopter landed on the frozen paddy-field under fire and picked up several men of the Ulster Rifles.                         Other wounded on the slope nearby could not be reached.
All men spoke in terms of admiration of Major Shaw. His personal
courage and leadership, they said, was largely responsible for extricating the trapped companies.

©
The Daily Telegraph, 6th January 1951    


FIRST V.C. OF KOREAN WAR

POSTHUMOUS AWARD

The first award of the Victoria Cross to be made in the war in
Korea was announced in last night's London Gazette. The award
is made posthumously to Major Kenneth Muir, The Argyll and
Sutherland Highlanders (Princess Louise's).
The citation says that on September 23, 1950, B and C Companies
of the 1st. Battalion The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, attacked
an enemy-held feature, Hill 282, and by 8.30 a.m. had consolidated
upon it. Some difficulty was experienced in evacuating the wounded
from the position and demands were made for stretcher-bearing
parties to be sent forward by the battalion. At this juncture the
position came under mortar and shell fire. At about nine o'clock the
stretcher-bearing party arrived and with it came the battalion second-
in-command, Major Muir, who began to organize the evacuation of
the casualties. Half-an-hour later small parties of the enemy started to
infiltrate on the left flank, necessitating the reinforcing of the
forward platoon.
For the next hour this infiltration increased, as did the shelling and
mortaring, causing further casualties within the two companies.
By 11 a.m. casualties were severe and difficulty was being experi-
enced in holding the enemy. In addition, because the left flank had
had to be reinforced and men sent to assist with the wounded both
companies were so inextricably mixed that it was obvious that they
must come under a unified command. Major Muir, although only vis-
iting the position, automatically took over command, and with com-
plete disregard for his own personal safety started to move around the
forward elements, cheering on and encouraging the men to greater
efforts although ammunition was running low. He was continually
under enemy fire, and, in spite of entreaties from officers and men
alike, refused to take cover.

RETREAT JUSTIFIED
An air-strike against the enemy was arranged, but unfortunately the
aircraft hit the companies' position instead of that of the enemy. The
main defence position was hit with fire bombs and machine-gun fire,
causing more casualties and necessitating the withdrawal of the
remaining troops to a position some 50 feet below the crest. There
is no doubt that a complete retreat from the hill would have been
justified at this time. Only about 30 fighting men remained and
ammunition was extremely low. Major Muir realised that the enemy
had not taken immediate advantage of the unfortunate incident, and
that the crest was still unoccupied although under fire.
With the assistance of the three remaining officers, he immediately
formed a small force of about 30 all ranks and personally led a
counter-attack on the crest. To appreciate fully the implication of this,
says the citation, it is necessary to realize how demoralizing the effect
of the air-strike had been, and it was entirely due to Major Muir's
courage, determination and splendid example that such a counter-
attack was possible. All ranks responded magnificently and the crest
was retaken.
From this moment Major Muir's actions were beyond all praise.
He was determined that the wotnded would have adequate time to
be taken out, and he was just as determined that the enemy would
not take the crest.
Grossly outnumbered and under heavy automatic fire, Major Muir
moved about his small force redistributing fast-diminishing ammuni-
tion and when the ammunition for his own weapon was spent, he took
over a two-inch mortar which he used with very great effect against
the enemy.

- 28 -

29 While firing the mortar he was still shouting encouragements and
advice to his men and for a further five minutes the enemy were held.
Finally, Major Muir was hit with two bursts of automatic fire which
mortally wounded him, but even then he retained consciousness and
was still determined to fight on.
The citation concludes: "The effect of his splendid leadership on
the men was nothing short of amazing, and it was entirely due to his
magnificent courage and example and the spirit which he imbued in
those about him that all wounded were evacuated from the hill, and,
as was subsequently discovered, very heavy casualties inflicted on the
enemy in defence of the crest."

©
The Times, 6th January 1951


BRITISH MAJOR KILLED

The War Office announces that Major C.C.G. Milward (Royal
Northumberland Fusiliers) has been killed in action in Korea.

© The Times, 9th January 1951


CHINESE MASSING FOR ATTACK

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, January 9 - United
Nations troops in central Korea, fighting to keep open the escape
route to the south-east of the Eighth Army, which continues its
"matic withdrawal from the area south of Seoul towards the old
Pusan beachhead, have regained in counter-attacks - at heavy cost to
the enemy - some of the ground lost in their own withdrawal from
Wonju.
Two battalions, strongly supported by artillery and by fighter-
bombers, clashed with enemy forces two miles south of Wonju, and a
regiment in a vigorous drive six miles south-west of the town recov-
ered several hundred yards of ground lost to the enemy on Monday.
Reports today said that these actions were continuing.
On the western front south of Osan there was a heavy snowfall and
only patrol actions were reported, but the Eighth Army intelligence
said that the Chinese were building up massive attack forces at least
two Chinese armies of possibly 80,000 or more men - in the area
around Osan and near Kumyang-jang, a road junction 12 to 15 miles
north-east of Osan. Some patrol actions were reported 13 and 14
miles south-east of Osan, about 50 miles by road from the Kum river
line set up last July by the United States 24th Division for the defence
of Taejon.

TROOPS IN PEASANT DRESS
infiltration of the allied lines by Chinese soldiers mingling in civil-
ian clothes with great masses of refugees from the north has reached
such dangerous proportions that - according to a Press report from the
field - orders have been given to allied pilots to shoot at anyone seen
behind the enemy lines except family groups and children.
The number of refugees is so great that there is much difficulty in
finding places of refuge for them. At Pusan, where the Korean
Republic has established its provisional capital, an official said yester-
day that a million civilians were being moved to islands off the south
coast and 300,000 had already been taken to two groups of islands.
Dmtic military censorship of dispatches from Korea is reported
from Tokyo. A Chicago Daily News correspondent declared that:
"General MacArthur's censors have been given authority to delete
from war dispatches virtually anything that displeases them ....
What correspondents had hoped would be censorship for military
security - that is control over news of troop movements, destinations,
lines of defence - has broadened into something that amounts to
political and psychological censorship."

FRENCH CASUALTIES
Associated Press said that field censors had cut large sections from
dispatches on the ground of military security. Some of its reports had
arrived in Tokyo without their first, most important, paragraph. One

report was completely forbidden because it dealt with what the
American soldiers were thinking in the "pull back," a movement
correspondents are forbidden to call a "retreat," though the troops are
well aware they are retreating.
Eighth Army headquarters announced to-day that war correspon-
dents violating censorship regulations would be subject to expulsion
or trial by court-martial. It was pointed out that correspondents
accompanying armies in time of war, although not in military service,
are subject to military law and are under the control of the command-
er of the army force.
Some facts which regulations would seem to forbid being reported
have been disclosed however. Although identification of units in the
allied counter-attack north of Chechon was forbidden it was permitted
to be made known that the first French casualties in Korea occurred in
the battle for Wonju, when the French had to fight their way out of a
trap. It is also learned that a French battalion and a Dutch unit are
attached to an American division.
Other facts passed by the censors were that friendly civilians had
told Eighth Army officers that only 30 per cent of an enemy force of
2,.000 to 3,000 men, moving on Monday through Suwon, 20 miles
south of Seoul, were armed with rifles. The remainder carried hand
grenades. A force of about the same size, west of Osan, had rifles for
only half its men, and civilian clothes were being worn.

©
The Times, 10th January 1951


ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES

The War Office states that in view of reports that the Royal Ulster
Rifles had been virtually wiped out in recent actions in Korea official
reports do not in any way indicate that this is so, and in fact state that
all units of the 29th Brigade are still in action and in very good heart,
though the brigade has sustained casualties. Next-of-kin are being
informed as and when casualties are notified to the War Office.

© The Times, 12th January 1951


COMFORTS FOR TROOPS IN KOREA

The War Office states that many inquiries are being received about
the sending of comforts to the forces in Korea, and it appreciates that
organizations or individuals may wish to send woollen or other com-
forts to Korea. Arrangements have been made that packages not
addressed to individuals, but which are for general distribution or for
particular units, may be dispatched under War office arrangements.
Application should be made to:- The Under-Secretary of State, War
Office (A.G.3.W.), London, S.W.1 (telephone Grosvenor 8040, Ext.
181), for details of dispatch, stating size and weight of package(s) and
general nature of contents.
The most acceptable gifts at present are: Balaclava helmets, mittens,
scarves, handkerchiefs, pipes, combs, and fountain-pens.

© The Times, 15th January 1951


U.N. PATROLS BUSY IN KOREA

ARMIES STILL OUT OF CONTACT

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, January 17 - Since noon
on Tuesday (Korean time) Press correspondents have been under a
strict censorship which has made it impossible to give the location of
corps, divisions, or lesser units of the allied forces. Usually such a
tightening of censorship means that a movement of troops is in
progress.

© The Times, 18th January 1951

- 29 -

30 DUTCH COMMANDER'S CRITICISM

With Dutch Forces in Korea, January 17 - Thecommandingofficer
of the Dutch Van Heutze Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Rend den
Ouden, a veteran of the Indonesian "police action," said today: "We
fight blindly, not knowing where the North Koreans are, but they
always know where we are. We never stop in one place long enough
to set up an intelligence organization."
Colonel den Ouden was critical of United Nations tactics.

- © Reuters

The Times, 18th January 1951



"OMINOUS QUIET" IN KOREA

ENEMY SEEN TO BE MASSING

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, January 18 - Press
correspondents in Korea reported today that there was no change
from the "ominous quiet" which has prevailed for several days over
most of the front, but that there was abundant evidence of heavy troop
concentrations. Such news as has been allowed to come through the
strict censorship, which has been in force since Tuesday, is almost
entirely of patrol actions.


© The Times 19th January 1951


BRITISH CASUALTIES IN KOREA

A LIST OF 325

The following casualties in action in Korea have been notified to
the War Office:

8TH HUSSARS - KILLED - Lt. C.G. Alexander.

MISSING - Sergeant F.W. Andrews, Sergeant E.R. Collings, Sergeant
G.J. Taylor, Corporal F.C. Cameron, Corporal H.E. Hogg, Corporal A.
Spurr, Lance Corporal R.O. Erricker, Lance Corporal J.S. Livett,
Lance Corporal V.F. White, Trooper C. Adams, Trooper C. Bates,
Trooper Beekerley, Trooper S. Carr, Trooper A. Calverley, Trooper
C.H. Chapman, Trooper R.A. Cocks, Trooper J. Collinson, Trooper R.
Dooley, Trooper E. Faweett, Trooper C.H. Holland, Trooper B. Jones,
Trooper E.H. McManus, Trooper S. Parker, Trooper R.R. Richardson,
Trooper P.F. Rowley, Trooper C.A. Sadier, Trooper A.E. Surridge.

ROYAL ARTILLERY - Officers -MISSING - Captain R.D. Fleming,
Captain W.M. Holman, M. B.E., Captain J. L. Lane, Lieutenant
(Temp./Captain) A.H. Gibbon.

Other Ranks - KILLED - Gunner T.L. Curtiss, Gunner G. Cawood,
Gunner W.A. Edwards, Gunner N. Grayston, Gunner R. Harrison.

WOUNDED - Lance Bombardier E. French, Lance Bombardier J.G.
Malby, Gunner C. Christopher, Gunner D. Davies.

MISSING - Bombardier L. Bristow, Bombardier EW. Moore,
Bombardier J.D. Morgan, Gunner J. Amall, Gunner E. Clinton,
Gunner E. Digan, Gunner R. England, Gunner S. Foy, Gunner L.
Leak, Gunner L.G. Taplin, Gunner R. Thompson, Gunner W. Wood,
Gunner G.H. May, Gunner W.R. Slade, Gunner J.A. Snell, Gunner L.
Wright, Gunner G. Yates.

ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS - KILLED -
2nd Lieutenant G.M. Fitz-Gibbon.

WOUNDED - Captain R.E Blenkinsop; Lieutenant L.J.Beavis,

30a West Yorkshires, att R.N.F.; Lieutenant S.D. Draper, Royal Leicesters
art R.N.F.; Lieutenant R.H.R. Westbury, Royal Leicesters, att R.N.F.

Other ranks - KILLED - Sergeant J. Bates, Sergeant D. Jackson,
Sergeant J. Williamson, Corporal C. Bailey, Fusilier J.W. Batey,
Fusilier R. Cue, Fusilier F. Fail, Fusilier T.H. MeNally, Fusilier E.
Roomes, Fusilier J.A. Seaman.

DIED OF WOLINDS - Lance Corporal A. Mclntosh, Lance Corporal
C. Sharpe, Fusilier H. Pickering.

WOUNDED - Sergeant T. Worstenholme, Corporal G. Benson,
Corporal J. Butterworth, Corporal L. Cam, Lance Corporal H.
Hodges, Lance Corporal J. Martin, Lance Corporal D. Shaw, Fusilier
J.M. Amos, Fusilier W.H. Bowtner, Fusilier E. Bennett, Fusilier F.D.
Brownlie, Fusilier L. Bastable, Fusilier M.S. Edwards, Fusilier J.H.
Green, Fusilier A. Grievson, Fusilier J. Haigh, Fusilier E. Hughes,
Fusilier R. Jarvis, Fusilier E. Kelly, Fusilier W. Keeton, Fusilier A.
Ladd, Fusilier J. Murphy, Fusilier E. Medlock, Fusilier K. McCrossan,
Fusilier A.C. McNeil, Fusilier D.A. Parker, Fusilier J. Pearson,
Fusilier J. Pennock, Fusilier W. Slack, Fusilier D. Stephenson, Fusilier
J. Smith, Fusilier F.L. Treasure, Fusilier J.D. Thompson, Fusilier S.
Wingrove, Fusilier R. Wilson, Fusilier E. Watson.

MISSING - Fusilier H. Amo, Fusilier J.W. Cannon.

ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - Officers - MISSING - Major C.A.H.B.
Blake, Major M.D.G.C. Ryan, Captain J.H.S. Majury, Lieutenant ER.
Bruford-Davies, 2nd Lieutenant G.V.B. Prescott-Westear.

WOUNDED - Major H.M. Gaffikin, Captain A.J. McCallan,
Lieutenant R. Benson.


Other Ranks - KILLED - Corporal E. Wheeler, Rifleman D.S. Austin,
Rifleman J. Bergin*, Rifleman D. Johnston, Rifleman A. King,
Rifleman T. Kennedy, Rifleman R.J. McCain, Rifleman T. Ostle,
Rifleman R. Porter*, Rifleman C. Ramsay, Rifleman T. Wright.

*Both repatriated in prisoner of war exchange after ceasefire.
Rifleman Bergin on 10th August,@t 1953 and Rifleman Porter on 24th
April1953.

WOUNDED - Sergeant G.S. Copping, Corporal S. Cunningham,
Corporal J. Daly, Corporal C. Hyndman, Corporal F.J. Pierce, Lance
Corporal J. Carter, Lance Corporal M. Grimble, Lance Corporal P.
Greene, Lance Corporal N. Hunt, Lance Corporal G.C. Masters,
Lance Corporal D.L. Robb, Lance Corporal R. Smith, Rifleman C.W.
Brown, Rifleman E. Bowers, Rifleman H.W. Cannon, Rifleman H.G.
Clarke, Rifleman A. Carlyle, Rifleman R. Cam, Rifleman S.P. Clancy,
Rifleman J.P. Callaghan, Rifleman A. Edwards, Rifleman J.D.
Fitzpatrick, Rifleman E. Fleming, Rifleman W. Gerrens, Rifleman J.
Hughes, Rifleman J. Horan, Rifleman H. Hope, Rifleman H. Heath,
Rifleman E. Jones, Rifleman W. Johnson, Rifleman J. McCloskey,
Rifleman T.J. McKinley, Rifleman S.J. MeClelland, Rifleman W.
Massey, Rifleman K.B. M MeArdle, Rifleman P. Martin, Rifleman 1.
Newton, Rifleman G. Pollock, Rifleman R. Rea, Rifleman W. Sinclair,
Rifleman G. Tague, Rifleman G. Tosh, Rifleman H. Timmons,
Rifleman E.F. Woods, Rifleman S. White.

MISSING - Sergeant N.E. Balfour, Sergeant L. Kavanagh, Sergeant E
Nugent, Sergeant PM. O'Hara, Sergeant S.J.H. Rankin, Corporal W.
Adair, Corporal H. Barbour, Corporal W. Colleton, Corporal W.
Davidson, Corporal R. Evans, Corporal J.S. Lavery, Corporal W.J.
McConnell, Corporal W.A. Moore MM, Corporal P. McGeoghegan,
Corporal A. Turner, Corporal P.F.P. Williams, Lance Corporal W.J.
Ashton, Lance Corporal W. Buxton, Lance Corporal F. Dytor, Lance
Corporal T. Flanagan, Lance Corporal A. Gill, Lance Corporal S.
Harris, Lance Corporal F. Johnson, Lance Corporal J. Spence, Lance
Corporal M. Vance.
Rifleman A. Aicken, Rifleman W.C. Anderson, Rifleman E. Akid,
Rifleman J.T. Alexander, Rifleman T. Agnew, Rifleman M.B. Bunby,
Rifleman H. Burton, Rifleman JR. Bartlett, Rifleman J. Burcher,

- 30 -

31 Rifleman J.C. Bustard, Rifleman L. Bell, Rifleman J.J. Buckley,
Rifleman F. Brodie, Rifleman J.C. Burton, Rifleman B. Canavan,
Rifleman K. Clarke, Rifleman R. Craig, Rifleman F. Crilly, Rifleman
R.S. Clifford, Rifleman R. Cartledge, Rifleman J. Donelly, Rifleman
R. Dodd, Rifleman J. Doherty, Rifleman J. Davison, Rifleman W.O.
Davies, Rifleman S.F. Ellsmore, Rifleman L. Elliott, Rifleman E.
English, Rifleman D. Fulton, Rifleman C. Fogarty, Rifleman M.
Foster, Rifleman S.H. Greer, Rifleman G. Grace, Rifleman R. Gore,
Rifleman E. Griffiths, Rifleman S.J. Graham, Rifleman J. Gillespie,
Rifleman H.W. Gamer, Rifleman R. Green, Rifleman S. Higginson,
Rifleman J. Hibbert, Rifleman S. Healey, Rifleman J. Horobin,
Rifleman F. Harper, Rifleman T.J. Holmes, Rifleman W. Heaney,
Rifleman B. Hill, Rifleman H.H. Jones, Rifleman T.J. Kelly, Rifleman
J.J. Kerr, Rifleman W. Lodge, Rifleman W.H. Ligget, Rifleman J.
Langan, Rifleman T.W. Lorimer, Rifleman M. McSherry, Rifleman S.
McKenzie, Rifleman J.W. Murray, Rifleman T. McConaghy, Rifleman
J.H. McNally, Rifleman R.W. Maguire, Rifleman C. Mulhall,
Rifleman R.J. McConnick, Rifleman C.C. Murray, Rifleman F.
Moore, Rifleman P. Morgan, Rifleman P. May, Rifleman J. Magee,
Rifleman W. McWilliams, Rifleman T.B. McHaffey, Rifleman R.J.
McCracken, Rifleman A.J. Meanley, Rifleman A. MacNab, Rifleman
P. MacCurrie, Rifleman F. Moxham, Rifleman A.J. Newman,
Rifleman F. O'Hanlon, Rifleman H. Oates, Rifleman E. Peach,
Rifleman J. Parker, Rifleman C.A. Pinder, Rifleman S.F. Plant,
Rifleman W.G. Pollard, Rifleman H. Payne, Rifleman A.E. Quinn,
Rifleman F. Reynolds, Rifleman J. Rainey, Rifleman P. Ryan,
Rifleman R.F. Roberts, Rifleman S Robinson, Rifleman J.W. Shaw,
Rifleman A.S. Small, Rifleman H. Smith, Rifleman J. Shannon,
Rifleman R. Shelly, Rifleman J. Sullivan, Rifleman W. Street,
Rifleman J. Stevenson, Rifleman W. Stephens, Rifleman W. Sutton,
Rifleman E.F. Spencer, Rifleman V. Swindells, Rifleman G.W. Smith,
Rifleman A.E. Tice, Rifleman L.G. Tanner, Rifleman A. Taggart,
Rifleman R. Traynor, Rifleman T. White, Rifleman W.J. Woodhouse,
Rifleman W. Wilcox, Rifleman J. Waide, Rifleman S.G. Wallace.

ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS - MISSING - Captain A.M.
Ferrie, Corporal J. Taylor.

WOUNDED - Corporal J. Hough.

ROYAL ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERS

KILLED - Craftsman R. Reed.

WOUNDED - Craftsman E.V. Ball, Craftsman N.H. Whitfield.

MISSING - Lance Corporal A.G. McKell.

ARMY CATERING CORPS - KILLED - Private P.J. Smallshaw.

WOUNDED - Private W.J. Alien, Private D. Baggotts.

MISSING - Private P.J. MeDonnell


© The Times, 20th January 1951


BRITISH CASUALTIES IN KOREA

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

8th HUSSARS - MISSING - Captain D.L. Astley-Cooper, Lieutenant
D.F.P.C. Probyn, Lance Corporal A.E. Campbell.

THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT - KILLED - Lieutenant L.H. St.
C. Reilly.

THE ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - MISSING -
Corporal J. Hannaway, Rifleman J. MeMullan, Rifleman P. Megoras, 31a Rifleman J. MeDonagh.

WOUNDED - Lance Corporal F. Johnson (originally reported
missing, now located in hospital). Returned from missing - Corporal
W. Colleton, Rifleman H. Burton.

THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT -
MISSING - Private C. Ashton.


© The Daily Telegraph, 27th January 1951


BRITISH FORCES IN KOREA

RATIONS AND CLOTHING

In the house of Lords - Viscount Long asked the Government a
number of questions concerning the welfare of all the British forces
serving in Korea. He wanted to know what was happening about
prisoners of war and those who were missing. China did not recognize
the Red Cross, but efforts should be made to reduce the period that
parents and wives had to wait.
Was the scale of rations today for all three services less than that
obtaining in 1939-45 and, if so, was there any intention to increase
the scale?
With regard to clothing, he was surprised that the War Office had
issued a letter on January 13 asking women to knit Balaclava helmets
and other accessories. He asked if that letter had been sent to the
British Legion and the Women's Institutes, and whether it had been
broadcast how the comforts were to be made and sent. Would special
wool be granted at reasonable prices? He understood that one of
our brigades had the right boots and the other had not. It seemed
staggering that when war in Korea was imminent somebody could not
have seen to the need for proper clothing. After all, only two brigades
were involved.
He hoped that the information he had received about welfare
services was incorrect; if it were not it was inhuman. He had heard
that the father and mother of a private undergoing court-martial for
the so-called murder of a Korean had had their first news of this affair
from newspaper accounts.
Viscount Hall said that responsibility for welfare of forces in a
particular area rested with the Commander-in-Chief The responsible
authorities had said that welfare arrangements in the Far East were
satisfactory, and that the present standards were considered to be
comparable with those in the last war. NAAFI provided mobile
canteens for our troops and Commonwealth troops in Korea. When
British troops were integrated with American units arrangements had
been made for them to draw United States military permit certificates
for use in American canteens. As far as could be ascertained rations
were satisfactory, and up to the scale in force in South-East Asia
Command during the war. The Royal Navy had always been pro-
vided with winter clothing when on the North China station; the
R.A.F. was based on Japan where winter clothing was not required,
but special electrically heated flying equipment had been provided for
crews operating farther north, particularly in Korea. The 27th Brigade
and R.M. Commando had been supplied with full United States
winter clothing and the 29th Brigade was equipped with full winter
clothing of a British type. More than 12,000 woollen helmets and
7,000 fur caps were sent to Korea as a service issue, and as a result
of an appeal, nearly 20,000 woollen articles had been sent by the War
Office on behalf of the W.V.S.
Leave centres and rest camps were situated in Japan, Hong Kong,
Singapore, and Malaya. There was a full establishment of chaplains
of all denominations in Korea.


© The Times 30th January 1951

- 31 -

R.A.F. FLYING-BOAT MISSING

Hong Kong, January 29 - Aircraft from Okinawa, the Philippines,
Formosa, and Hong Kong were searching today for a Royal Air Force
Sunderland flying-boat missing on a flight from lwakuna, Japan.
The search was concentrated in the Formosa region, where a Chinese
Nationalist news agency report said an aircraft crashed in the sea
yesterday
. -
© Reuters

The Times 30th January 1951



BRITISH LOSSES IN KOREA

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office.

THE ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS - WOUNDED
- Corporal C. Barbour; Fusilier G.W. Gordon.

THE ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - MISSING - Lance Corporal R.A.
Smith.

ORIGINALLY REPORTED MISSING, NOW REJOINED UNIT -
Rifleman J. Magee.

WOUNDED - Corporal W.J. Wiseley; Rifleman T. Bamett; Rifleman
M. Dougan; Rifleman W.J. McLean.


© The Times, 3rd February 1951


AWARDS FOR SERVICE IN
KOREAN WATERS

The King has approved the promotion of Vice-Admiral W.G.
Andrewes to be Knight Commander of the Military Division of the
Order of the British Empire, and the appointment of Captain U. H. R.
James, Royal Navy, to be Commander of the same Order, both for
distinguished service in Korean waters since July last year.
Also gazetted for similar service is the award of a bar to the
Distinguished Service Order to Captain J.S.C. Salter, Royal Navy,
a second bar to the Distinguished Service Order to Lieutenant-
Commander H.J. Lee, Royal Navy, and the Distinguished Service
Cross to Lieutenant P.M. Lamb, Royal Navy.
Two M.B.E.s, eight B.E.M.s, two D.S.M.s, and a bar to the D.S.M.,
and 39 mentions in dispatches (one posthumous) have also been
awarded.


© The Times, 3rd February 1951


R.A.F. FLYING BOAT FOUND WRECKED

Taipeh (Formosa) February 6 - Chinese Nationalist police have
identified wreckage found on an east Formosa mountain as that of the
Royal Air force Sunderland flying boat missing since January 28.
There were no survivors. The police salvaged some contents of the
wreckage, including a bag of mail.
-
© Reuters

The Times, 7th February 1951

In correspondence between Bob Barker, a Korean veteran, and
the Royal Air Force, it was revealed that those on board flying boat
PP 148 were buried at the crash site, Chung Pin Shan.
- Peter Fisher


 BRITISH PILOT MISSING

The Admiralty regrets to announce that Lieutenant Alan Charles
Beavan, Royal Navy, (Cardiff), of H.MS. Theseus, has been reported
missing, presumed killed, after his aircraft crashed into the Yellow
Sea on January 26. This is the first pilot operating from a British
aircraft carrier in the Korean war zone to be reported missing.


© The Times 7th February 1951


GALLANTRY AWARDS IN KOREA

Westminster Wednesday - The Prime Minister announced in the
House of Commons this afternoon the number of awards made to
officers below the rank of major, or equivalent, and to other ranks,
for gallantry in Korea.
Replying to Mr. Martin Lindsay, the Conservative member for
Solihull, Mr Attlee said that the awards were one distinguished
Service Cross, one Bar to the Military Cross, one Bar to the
Distinguished Service Medal, two Distinguished Service Medals,
one Member of the Order of the British Empire, eight British Empire
Medals, and 21 Mentions in Dispatches. It was not practicable to
give a precise average figure for the period of delay between the deed
and the announcement of the award as some of the awards covered
services over a prolonged period. Changes in procedure had recently
been introduced to accelerate the recognition of specific acts of
gallantry.
Mr. Martin Lindsay said the awards were of great encouragement to
the units and individuals concerned. He asked why there had been
such a meagre number of awards in the Army, which had been fight-
ing in Korea for more than seven months.
Mr. Attlee said he understood that there was another list of awards
under consideration.


© The Times, 8th February 1951


CHINESE FREE SIX BRITISH SOLDIERS

Tokyo, Friday - Six soldiers of the Royal Ulster Rifles reached an
American Divisional H.Q. early to-day.
They were released by the Chinese and North Koreans, who
captured the men on January 2nd.
They were among 37 United Nations prisoners who reached the
H.Q. They were captured in a night battle at what became known as
"Happy Valley," north of Seoul, the South Korean capital.
The men walked into the H.Q. at 2 a.m. They appeared well fed,
well dressed and healthy. All were shaved. They carried their own
equipment.
They said their captors gave them a farewell party last night, and
then took them to a point within three miles of the United Nations
lines, releasing them at about midnight. They had been given a 21-
day indoctrination course in Communism, which they considered a
"big joke."
-
© Reuters and British United Press

The Daily Telegraph, 9th February 1951



CASUALTIES IN KOREA

The following casualties in action in Korea have been notified to
the War Office:

ROYAL ENGINEERS - WOUNDED - Sapper A. Graham, Sapper
W.V. Wilding.


© The Times, 10th. February 1951

- 32 -

U.N. PATROLS RECONNOITRE IN SEOUL

S. KOREANS REPORTED OVER PARALLEL

United Nations patrols have entered Seoul, and the port of Inchon
&A Kinipo airfield are again in allied hands. Later troops in the Seoul
am were withdrawn south of the Han river. On the central front
Chinese are reported to be taking over in considerable numbers from
the North Koreans.
It was reported by Reuters from Tokyo early today that a South
Korean division had occupied Yangyang, a coastal town five miles
north of the 38th parallel.


© The Times, 12th February 1951


THE 38TH PARALLEL

NOT AN URGENT QUESTION

From Our Own Correspondent, Washington, February 13 -
General Collins, the Chief of Staff of the Army, who addressed the
National Press Club today, was asked his views about crossing the
38th parallel. He replied that any decision on that subject was for
the political leaders to make, but he did not think it was one which
needed to be decided urgently, as he did not expect any swarm of
United Nations forces to be in a position to cross the parallel in the
immediate future.
The Washington Post, commenting on the question this morning,
said that the last time the parallel was crossed "the blunder lay, not
so much in General MacArthur's failure to anticipate the Chinese
intervention, as in the freedom of action that was allowed him in a
situation which had become primarily political." It considered this
was merely a repetition of the cardinal errors which marked military
~ons during the second world war. A second opportunity to take
a political initiative in Korea might now be coming, it said, and
though "the military lesson of the bloody nose we got in North Korea
arms to have been learnt ... is the same wisdom apparent in the
political field?"


© The Times, 14th February 1951


MIDDLESEX CHARGE WITH BAYONETS

With British Troops in Korea, Thursday - British, Australian
and New Zealand troops attacking on the critical left flank of the
Communist drive in the central sector of Korea, to-day heavily
defeated the Chinese. They made more valuable gains north of Yoju.
The Middlesex Regiment, one company of which charged with
bayonets at dawn this morning, shattered Chinese counter-attacks on
Hill 122. They had captured the hill in yesterday's fighting.
After two hours of some of the fiercest hand-to-hand fighting British
hoops have experienced in Korea the Chinese fled. They left their
dead strewn in, and within feet of, British weapon-pits.
While Jeeps of the Indian field ambulance shuttled back and forth
along the muddy roads leading to the front carrying British and
Chinese wounded, Australian infantry moved in to attack another hill
elder north towards Chipyong.
As the sun fell to-day the Australians, behind a barrage of New
Zealand artillery, walked steadily through Communist fire to attack.

ATTACK ON THREE SIDES
The full weight of the Chinese counter-attack on the Middlesex this
morning fell on a company holding one of the horns of Hill 122.
The hill commands the valley up which Commonwealth troops were
attacking.
Just before dawn the Chinese, estimated to be a battalion, crept on
the company from three sides. They used grappling irons to help them  up the steep sides of the ridge.
When well within grenade-throwing distance they flung themselves
on the British weapon pits. They blew whistles and shouted, "Come
on Johnny."
The first wave of Chinese overran the flank of a platoon, throwing
grenades and firing rifles and automatics. Chinese mortar fire fell
among the rest of the battalion. The tank platoon was ordered back to
its adjacent platoon. But that was the only rearward movement the
battalion made.

BAYONET CHARGE
The men stayed in their holes and fought the Chinese off with their
Sten guns until dawn broke. Then as first light showed the company
charged with fixed bayonets.
The Chinese broke and fled down the slopes of the ridge and across
the frozen rice fields below. The Middlesex calmly sighted their
weapons on the fleeing enemy and shot them down as they ran.
About 65 Chinese dead were counted among the British weapon pits.
More are believed to have been killed by intense artillery and mortar
defensive fire put down during the counter-attack.
The Chinese took 10 Middlesex troops prisoner but all except two
escaped later. One of those captured, Private Leslie Butcher, 19, of
Cockering-road, Canterbury, said "When we were pulling back 10
Chinese surrounded my trench.
They tried to take my Sten off me. I tried to keep hold of it but had
to give in. One of them marched me down the side of the hill and
across a paddy field. It was just getting light then and a Bren-gunner
back at company fired on us. He killed the Chinese and we dived in a
ditch full of water.
When 1 poked my head up the Bren fired at me again, 1 waved and
shouted and finally got him to realise who 1 was. Then 1 got out of the
ditch and walked back."
Another captured soldier, Private Don Soars, 19, of  Kernpshot-road,
Streatham, walked back through the retreating Chinese after artillery
had scattered his escort.
Sergeant William Lefevre, of Clapham, who also escaped, paid
tribute to Private George Swain, of Arundel, Sussex. Swain was the
Bren-gunner who shot Butcher's escort.
Lefevre said, "Swain kept firing his Bren right throughout the battle.
He was being shot at from three sides, but stayed in his trench and did
not duck once."
-
© Reuters

The Daily Telegraph, 16th February 1951


U.S. CASUALTIES

The latest announcement of American combat casualties in Korea
since the beginning of the war put them at 48,035, an increase of 647
in a week. The total included 7,245 killed in action, 31,395 wounded,
and 9,395 missing. Including wounded men who afterwards died, and
83 missing soldiers now known to have been killed, the number of
dead is 8,154.

© The Daily Telegraph, 16th February 1951


KOREA AWARDS

By a Military Correspondent - The King has approved the award
of the Military Cross to 2nd Lieutenant Christopher L. Lawrence,
The Middlesex Regiment, of Christchurch, and the Military Medal to
Warrant Officer T. Collett of Pontefract, and Corporal R.R. Sweeney
of West Calder Midlothian, both of the Argyll and Sutherland
Highlanders, for gallant and distinguished services in Korea.


©  The Daily Telegraph, 17th. February 1951

- 33 -

AMERICAN ATTITUDE

From Our Own Correspondent, Washington, February 16 -
President Truman's remark at his conference yesterday that the
problem of whether to cross the 38th parallel was a military matter
which was in the hands of the commanding General in the Far East
should be accepted - as it has been in Washington - as another
example of Mr. Truman's capacity for giving the wrong impression
when asked a question.
Nobody wants to inhibit patrols from moving over such an artificial
line as the parallel; nobody wants to tell the enemy that there is a line
behind which they can relax in safety; but equally nobody is thinking
in terms of repeating, even if it were possible, General MacArthur's
ill-fated dash for the Yalu River.


© The Times, 17th February 1951


BRITISH CASUALTIES IN KOREA

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

ROYAL ARTILLERY - WOUNDED - Lieutenant E.J. Sargent.

OTHER RANKS - KILLED - Gunner R.B. Newman, Gunner J.
Butman. (Should be Nutman).

RETURNED FROM MISSING - Gunner W.R. Slade.

ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - RETURNED FROM MISSING -
Sergeant S.J.H. Rankin, Lance Corporal S. Harris,
Rifleman E. Griffiths, Rifleman E. Akid.

© The Daily Telegraph, 24th February 1951


NEW GAINS ALMOST EVERYWHERE

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, February 26 - United
Nations forces, in spite of bad weather, streams in flood with bridges
down, and roads and trails deep in mud, have made new gains almost
everywhere along the Korean front except in the extreme west. In the
eastern part of the central theatre they have "virtually routed" accord-
ing to Lieutenant-General Almond, commander of the United States X
Corps, a North Korean force estimated at more than 60,000 men, and
have destroyed the combat effectiveness of two of its three corps.
Today for the first time the Eighth Army identified the United States
2nd Division as a participant in the offensive on the central front.
Two other divisions there were also mentioned today - the 7th and
25th. Previously mentioned were the I st Cavalry and 24th Divisions.
Besides American soldiers, allied troops on the IX Corps front
include a battalion of Canadians, a British Brigade, a battalion of
Australian and New Zealand troops.
(The British Brigade was
comprised of 2nd Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, 3rd
Royal Australian Regiment, and ]6th New Zealand Field Regiment,
1st. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and 1st. Middlesex Regiment
and 60th Indian Airborne Field Ambulance - Patrick Lohan.).


© The Times, 27th February 1951


BRITISH LOSSES IN KOREA

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

ROYAL TANK REGIMENT - Other Ranks - DIED OF WOUNDS -

Sergeant S.B. Streather.

WOUNDED - Lance Corporal A. Dickenson.

ROYAL ARTILLERY - Officers - WOUNDED -
Major T.Y Fisher-Hoch, Lieutenant W.R. Goss.

Other Ranks - KILLED - Gunner A.J. Baldock.

WOUNDED - Gunner W. Crackle, Gunner J.A. Gooding.

THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - Officers - KILLED -
Lieutenant D.A. Simcox (Beds and Herts art Gloster Regiment).

WOUNDED - Major C.E.B. Walwyn, D.S.O., 2nd Lieutenant A.C.N.
Preston, Lieutenant G.P. Herbert (Buffs att Gloster Regiment).

Other Ranks - KILLED - Corporal A. Herall, Corporal R. Jones,
Lance Corporal G. Spuffard, Private M. Burton, Private E. Bailey,
Private E. Crowson, Private D. Cason, Private G. Davies, Private G.
Ellson (art 1 Middlesex), Private T.J. Kelly, Private W.G. Tyler,
Private F. Williams.

WOUNDED - Acting Sergeant W. Harfield, Sergeant H.G. Jackson,
Sergeant R. Preece, Sergeant W.J. Smyth, Acting Corporal R.
Cattermole, Corporal H. Flanagan, Corporal D. Griffin, Corporal F.
Lacey, Corporal S. McMullen, Corporal W.G. Pinchin, Lance
Corporal R.N. Alinut, Lance Corporal J.S. Robertson, Lance Corporal
B. Walker, Private G.W. Andrews, Private J.E. Bloxham, Private W.G.
Bridgeman, Private C. Bird, Private A.J. Butler, Private V Brown,
Private A.J. Bradley, Private A. Cameron, Private B. Cokayne, Private
H.G. Churchyard, Private A. Clover (art I st Middlesex), Private L.
Edwards, Private R.H. Ellement, Private S. Edwards, Private W.
Goldsmith, Private S. Gates, Private M. Glinwood, Private J.S. Harris,
Private C. Haste, Private J.P. Head, Private G. Hill, Private F.S.
Houghton, Private D.R. Lidstone, Private I.J. Laing, Private J.P.
Mangan, Private D.L. Morris, Private A. Meredith, Private C.
Noonan, Private S.G. Poore, Private K.J. Poulton, Private T. Payton,
Private A.E. Preece, Private D.W. Payne, Private G.W. Quinton,
Private E.L. Stanbridge, Private L.D. Taylor, Private H.P. Underdown,
Private H. Uttley, Private J.E. Wiseman, Private J.F. Waite, Private R.
Yates.

THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT - KILLED - Sergeant D.
Hummerstone, Corporal R. Pegg, Private R. Bennett, Private G.
Harris, Private G.R. Minton (K.S.L.I. att Middlesex Regiment),
Private D.P. Pitt (K.S.L.I. att Middlesex Regiment).

WOUNDED - W.O. 11 T. Seabrook, Corporal P. Cooper, Corporal H.
King, Lance Corporal M. Durston, Lance Corporal R. Grummitt,
Lance Corporal J. Watkins, Private R. Brown (K.S.L.I. art Middlesex
Regiment), Private A. Cole, Private W.Carroll, Private D. Copus,
Private L. Cobby, Private W. Currie, Private J.J. Hine (South Stafrs
art Middlesex Regiment), Private E. Lineham, Private J. Ledger,
Private W. Neat (K.S.L.I. art Middlesex Regiment), Private J.
Peacock, Private R. Paternoster, Private C. Stevens, Private H.
Whitehouse (K.S.L.I. att Middlesex Regiment), Private K. Wood,
Private J. Walkley.

MISSING - Corporal R.D. Weaver, Private A.D. Maile.

ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - Officer - WOUNDED - Captain
G.W.H. Cocksedge MC (Inniskillings att R.U.R.)

Other Ranks - WOUNDED - Rifleman ER. Smith.

MISSING - Rifleman E.B. Lyons.


© The Times 3rd March 1951

- 34 -

MILITARY CROSS WON IN KOREA

2nd Lieutenant John Malcolm Cubiss, West Yorkshire Regiment,
has been awarded the Military Cross while serving with the Royal
Northumberland Fusiliers in Korea. The citation has not yet been
received from the War Office. Lieutenant Cubiss was born in
Knaresborough, Yorkshire. He is the son of Mr. W.E. Cubiss of
Airville Avenue, Bradford.


© The Daily Telegraph, 3rd March 1951


U.N. ASSAULT IN KOREA

HAN RIVER CROSSED

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, March 7 - United
Nations forces in now clear weather opened today a general assault
along a 55-mile stretch of the Korean front. On the western end of
the line, about 15 miles east of Seoul, allied artillery pounded enemy
positions for more than two hours, and after this barrage, in which
50,000 rounds were fired by 148 guns - 7,000 in the final 20 minutes
- a battalion of the famous 27th (Wolfhound) Regiment of the United
States 25th Division crossed the Han River in assault boats and
established a bridgehead.
A field dispatch this afternoon said that the division, supported by
tanks which lorded the Han River three hours after the first assault
battalion crossed in boats, had gained up to two miles and was inflict-
ing heavy casualties at comparatively light cost. An officer of the
division said that 100 Chinese surrendered and that at least 1,000 were
killed or wounded in the first six hours of the action. The prisoners
were from the Fiftieth and Thirty-eighth Armies.
In the middle of the central front United States Marines advanced
more than a mile along ridges parallel to the road north from
Hoengsong, and at five miles north of Hoengsong were last reported
meeting savage resistance from Chinese dug in on the crests.


© The Times, 8th March 1951


CASUALTIES IN KOREA

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

ROYAL ARTILLERY - Other Ranks - WOUNDED - Bombardier
F.W. Gooch, Lance Bombardier V.J. Mann, Lance Bombardier C.W.
Shutler, Gunner G. Bell, Gunner S. Harvey, Gunner B. McEleavey,
Gwiner J.E. Moore.

THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - Officers - WOUNDED
Lieutenant P.J.W. Hare,

35a Other Ranks - DIED OF WOUNDS -
Private J.D. Heward (art R.U.R.).

WOUNDED - Sergeant J. Claxton, Lance Corporal H. Hawkesworth,
Corporal S. Robinson, Private E.A. Tideswell.

Private C. Ashton (previously reported missing now reported as
having rejoined his unit).

THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT - Officer - WOUNDED -
2nd Lieutenant P.A.S. Wollocombe.

THE ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - Officers - DIED OF WOUNDS -
Captain N.A.M. Balders (Suffolks art R.U.R.).

WOUNDED - Major Sir C.J. Nixon.

Other Ranks - KILLED - Rifleman J,T. Doyle,
Rifleman J. O'Gorman.

WOUNDED - Sergeant W.H. Keen (Essex art R.U.R.),
Rifleman J.L. Bayliss, Rifleman J. Moore, Rifleman G. Pollock,
Rifleman D. Partiow, Rifleman H. White.

ARGYLL AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS -
Officer - WOUNDED - 2nd Lieutenant A.J. Lauder.

©  The Times, 10th March 1951


ENEMY RETREAT IN KOREA

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, March 12 Enemy forces
were reported in front line dispatches today to be withdrawing in all
haste all along the Korean front. United Nations troops moving up
towards Hongehon in the centre from three directions the United
States I st Cavalry Division from the South-west, British, Australian
and Canadian troops from the south, and United States Marines from
south-east - drove ahead from two to three miles, several of their
columns without any contact with the enemy.
On Monday tanks of the I st Cavalry Division, and British,
Australians, and Canadians had got to within five miles, and Marines
to within six miles of Hongchon. There they were only a little more
than 20 miles from the 38th parallel.
On the east-central front North Korean resistance has collapsed.
Allied troops pursuing the fleeing enemy yesterday seized the mile-
high Mount Taemi without firing a shot. Aerial observers reported
that on the west front also there were signs that the enemy, outflanked
by the United States 25th Division and the United Nations forces
which had followed it into its big bridgehead across the Han river,
was preparing to abandon Seoul.


© The Times, 13th March 1951

- 35 -

14th. March 1951 to 12th. June 1951


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000           50th.ANNIVERSARY YEARS          27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM
 

Private F.S. BRAILSFORD 20 1 Glosters 19 March 1951
Rifleman S.G. WALLACE 36 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 20 March 1951
Trooper G.C. COSTELLO 19 8th Hussars 'B' Squadron 23 March 1951
Trooper A.G. WILLMOT 24 8th Hussars 'B' Squadron 23 March 1951
Trooper L. HEATH 20 7 Royal Tank Regt 'C' Squadron 28 March 1951
Trooper R.W. SHERIDAN 21 7 Royal Tank Regt 'C' Squadron 01 April 1951
2nd Lieutenant M.J.D. CAWTHORN 21 1 A&SH 04 April 1951
Lieutenant J.A.C. MILNER 22 Dorsets att 1 A&SH 04 April 1951
Marine H. MELLING 28 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 07 April 1951
Trooper C.A. SADLER 36 8th Hussars HQ Squadron Recce 08 April 1951
Marine S. SKELTON 19 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 1 1 April 1951
Trooper M.C. SAYERS 23 7 Royal Tank Regt 'C' Squadron 1 1 April 1951
Rifleman W. McWILLIAMS 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 12 April 1951
Fusilier S. LUDLOW 28 1 Royal Northumberland Fusiliers 13 April 1951
Private W.A. HEATH 21 South Staffs att 1 Middlesex 13 April 1951
Lance Corporal R.J. STANFORD 22 1 Middlesex 14 April 1951
Sergeant F. NUGENT 28 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 18 April 1951
Sergeant D. NORTHEY 23 1 Glosters ††† 22 April 1951
Rifleman R. MARTIN 31 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 22 April 1951

††† lmjin Roll has 25 April 1951

- 39 -


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000              50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS              27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Lieutenant K.W. EASTGATE 22 Royal Engineers 55 Indep Field Sqn 22 April 1951
Gunner V.F. BAYLEY 31 Royal Artillery 11 LAA Bty 23 April 1951
Private S.A.W. ALLUM 20 1 Glosters 23 April 1951
Major P.A. ANGIER 30 1 Glosters 23 April 1951
Private R.T. BALLARD 19 1 Glosters 23 April 1951
Lance Corporal D.A. BALLS 23 1 Glosters 23 April 1951
Corporal L.J. BISHOP 23 1 Glosters 23 April 1951
Private R.J. BURTON 19 1 Glosters 23 April 1951
Lieutenant P.K.E. CURTIS V C 24 D.C.L.I. att 1 Glosters 23 April 1951
Private H. JONES 31 1 Glosters 23 April 1951
Private A.G. JUDGE 30 Middlesex att 1 Glosters 23 April 1951
2nd Lieutenant J. M. MAYCOCK 21 1 Glosters 23 April 1951
Private H.F.E. TUCKER 24 1 Glosters 23 April 1951
Private H. UTTLEY 33 1 Glosters 23 April 1951
Lieutenant F.B. MILLINGTON 24 Royal Leicestershires att 1 R.N.F. 23 April 1951
Fusilier F.A. CURRY 33 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 23 April 1951
Fusilier A. EKE 34 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 23 April 1951
Fusilier K. FOSTER 22 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 23 April 1951
Lance Corporal H. HAMER 31 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 23 April 1951
Fusilier B.F. JOHNSON 27 York & Lancs att 1 R.N.F. 23 April 1951
Fusilier J. McDONALD 29 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 23 April 1951

- 40 -


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953

25 JUNE 2000       50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS         27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Lance Corporal D. OLDFIELD 21 1 Royal Northumberland Fus, 23 April 1951
Private R.B. COOK 24 Glosters att 1 R.U.R. 23 April 1951
Rifleman F.G. FITZGERALD 20 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 23 April 1951
Rifleman A. J. McNAUGHTON 25 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 23 April 1951
Rifleman S. MONTGOMERY 25 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 23 April 1951
Gunner J.W. CAMP 28 Royal Artillery 45 Fld Regt 70 Fld Bt 23 April 1951
Gunner R. CRUIKSHANKS 29 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regt 23 April 1951
Gunner T.F. GIBSON 30 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regt 23 April 1951
Gunner W. HEWITT 31 Royal Artillery 45 Fld Regt 70 Fld Bty 23 April 1951
Lieutenant A.B.S. HUDSON 26 Royal Artillery 45 Fld Regt 70 Fld Bty 23 April 1951
Gunner A. OGDEN 29 Royal Artillery 11 LAA Bty 23 April 1951
Private I. C. WEBSTER 29 R.A.M.C. No. 1 Sec. 26 Fld. Amb. 23 April 1951
Private F.T. BARCLAY 36 1 Glosters ††† 24 April 1951
Corporal G.B. BURCHILL 22 1 Glosters ††† 24 April 1951
Private J. CAIN 30 1 Glosters 24 April 1951
Private D.A. CORNISH 19 1Glosters 24 April 1951
Private W.E. DIX 31 1Glosters 24 April 1951
Private K.G. GUDGE 22 1Glosters 24 April 1951
Private P.D. HONE 19 1 Glosters 24 April 1951
Private J. MORLEY 29 1Glosters  ††† 24 April 1951
††† lmjin Roll has 23 April 1951
 ††† lmjin Roll has 25 April 1951

- 41 -


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000           50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS              27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Private B.N. ROBINS 21 Devons att 1 Glosters 24 April 1951
Corporal J.E. SHORT 26 1 Glosters 24 April 1951
Private J. B. SKOINES 19 1 Glosters 24 April 1951
Private W. F. SYNNOTT 33 1 Glosters 24 April 1951
Lance Corporal I. J. TAYLOR 30 1 Glosters 24 April 1951
Private R. VOSPER 22 1 Glosters 24 April 1951
Private D.W. WINTER 19 1 Glosters 24 April 1951
Private J. J. OATES 22 K.S.L.I. att 1 Middlesex 24 April 1951
Corporal T. AMOS 23 1 Middlesex 24 April 1951
Sergeant R.A. DONALD 25 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 24 April 1951
Lance Corporal G. INNES 32 Glosters att 1 Middlesex 24 April 1951
Private A.L. BAILEY 19 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Private D.N. BARBER 27 1 Glosters †† 25 April 1951
Private N.F. CHITTY 35 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Private P.J. ETHERINGTON 30 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Private R.A. GILDING 20 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Private D.R.K, HAMSON 19 Wiltshires att 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Private V.H. HILL 35 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Private R.W. HUGHES 30 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Private D.G.E. JONES 23 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
††  lmjin Roll has 25 April 1951

- 42 -


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000          50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS          27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Private D.W. KING 23 Glosters att 1 R.U.R. 25 April 1951
Corporal P.J. MAYCOCK 30 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Private D.G. MORRIS 19 Glosters att 1 R.U.R. 25 April 1951
Private E.C. MORRISS 19 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Private A.K. PEARCE 24 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Captain R.A.St.M. REEVE-TUCKER 28 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Private W. ROBERTS 33 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Lance Corporal D.M. TAYLOR 24 1 Glosters 25 April 1951
Fusilier P. ANGUS 22 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Fusilier T.E. BLOORE 19 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Fusilier S.D. BROADWAY 23 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Sergeant C. CLARK 24 Duke of Wellington's art 1 R.N.F. 25 April 1951
Fusilier B.L. COX 30 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Fusilier R.G. FORD 21 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Lieut Colonel K.O.N. FOSTER DSO OBE 44 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Lance Corporal J. KAIN 29 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Fusilier D. LANGLEY 23 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Fusilier K.G. MURRAY 24 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
2nd Lieutenant G. D. RUDGE 20 Cheshire att 1 R.N.F. 25 April 1951
Fusilier C. SADLER 19 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951

- 43 -


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000            50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS             27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Fusilier T. SHARP 29 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Fusilier D.E. TAMBLYN 23 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Fusilier J. TAYLOR 20 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Lance Corporal G.A. THORNTON 19 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Fusilier L. WALKER 23 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Fusilier T. WALNE 25 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Fusilier W.C. WELLMAN 30 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 25 April 1951
Sergeant A.F. BAGGOTT 28 E. Yorks att 1 R.N.F. 25 April 1951
Fusilier K. WINTERSGILL 19 R.N.F. att 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman T. BRANNAN 24 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman D. BROWN MM 31 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman C.D. CLARKE 25 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman H.J. CORDERY 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman K. FLETCHER 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Sergeant D. GAW 34 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman C. GOULDSBOROUGH 25 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman A. HINCHCLIFFE 29 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Sergeant F. LENNON 29 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Corporal J.0. LEWIS 31 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman H. LIDDLE 31 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951

- 44 -


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000          50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS           27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Corporal W. LORIMER 33 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman J. P. McCARTAN 22 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman H. McCRACKEN 23 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman T J. McGIVERN 29 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman C. MULHALL 26 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman S.B. MULLAN 19 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman B.A. MULLIGAN 22 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman J. PORTER 32 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman G. RIDING 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Major J. K. H. SHAW DSO MC 34 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman L. SHORT 19 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Lance Corporal J. SMITH 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman J. TWEEDIE 22 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman J. WALSHE 20 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Rifleman R.S.W. WASHER 29 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 April 1951
Lieutenant VA. DUNLOP 31 King's Regiment att 1 R.U.R. 25 April 1951
Trooper A.R. SMITH 19 8th Hussars 'C' Squadron 25 April 1951
Trooper M.L. WALTON 19 8th Hussars 'C' Squadron 25 April 1951

- 45 -


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953

25 JUNE 2000           50th.  ANNIVERSARY YEARS           27 JULY 2003


IN MEMORIAM


Gunner J. F. KILBURN 20 Royal Artillery 170 Mortar Bty 25 April 1951
Gunner A. W. RUSSELL 20 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regt 25 April 1951
Sapper R. A. BALDWIN 21 Royal Engineers 55 Indep Field Sqn 25 April 1951
Sapper V. D. JUDD 20 Royal Engineers 55 Indep Field Sqn 25 April 1951
Sapper R. A. RENNIE 20 Royal Engineers 55 Indep Field Sqn 25 April 1951
Sapper C. L. WYLIE 23 Royal Engineers 55 Indep Field Sqn 25 April 1951
Lieutenant B. SWINBANKS 23 Royal Engineers 55 Indep Field Sqn 26 April 1951
Lance Corporal K.W. BALDWRN 24 1 Glosters  ††26 April 1951
Colour Sergeant H.E. BUXCEY 39 1 Glosters †† 26 April 1951
Private G. CHAPMAN 19 1 Glosters †† 26 April 1951
Private G. CLARKE 30 1 Glosters  †† 26 April 1951
Private F. M. CLUTTERBUCK 1 9 1 Glosters †† 26 April 1951
Private R. E. CREWS 21 1 Glosters †† 26 April 1951
Sergeant K. D. EAMES MM 23 1 Glosters  ††26 April 1951
Private H. GREEN 24 1 Glosters  ††26 April 1951
Private W. J. HAWKES 22 1 Glosters †† 26 April 1951
Private F. B. HILTON 22 1 Glosters  26 April 1951
Private T. MEADS 24 1 Glosters  †† 26 April 1951

†† lmjin Roll has 25 April 1951

- 46 -


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000        50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS       27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Corporal W. D. POSSEE 30 1 Glosters ††† 26 April 1951
Private A. J. SHEPPAPD 19 1 Glosters  † 26 April 1951
Fusilier R. SUGDEN 19 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 26 April 1951
Rifleman V.P. HURREN 22 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 26 April 1951
Sergeant H.W. DANES 29 R. Artillery 'C' Troop 170 Mortar Bty 26 April 1951
Fusilier R. WINTERTON 19 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 28 April 1951
Lieutenant E.P.L. STEPHENSON - Royal Navy HMS Glory 804 Sqn 28 April 1951
Marine G. AHERN 21 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Cdo. 30 April 1951
Private E. E. HARRISON 19 1 Glosters 01 May 1951
Private, E. C. MADGWICK 29 1 Glosters 01 May 1951
Private J. R. SYRON 22 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 01 May 1951
Sapper R. HARVEY 20 Royal Engineers 55 Indep Field Sqn 01 May 1951
Fusilier L. BASTABLE 25 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 May 1951
Fusilier M. CATCHPOLE 19 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 03 May 1951
Corporal J. GALLAGHER DCM 34 1 K.O.S.B. 20 May 1951
Lance Corporal W. HANLON 29 1 K.S.L.I. 20 May 1951
Lance Corporal G.A. YAPP 23 1 K.S.L.I. 20 May 1951
Private J. MILLAR 35 A&SH att 1 K.O.S.B. 21 May 1951
Private H. J. BANTON 20 1 K.O.S.B. 21 May 1951

 † lmjin Roll has 23 April 1951
††† lmjin Roll has 25 April 1951

- 47 -


 J JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000             50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS             27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Private J.H. PURDIE 19 1 K.O.S.B. 21 May 1951
Private A.B. CLARK 20 1 K.O.S.B. 22 May 1951
Corporal K.A. RICHARDSON 20 1 K.S.L.I. 22 May 1951
Driver W.C. GREENWOOD 24 R.A.S.C. att 26 Field Ambulance 26 May 1951
Mr. D.A.G. PEARCY 25 Reuters/Australian Assoc. Press Corr. 26 May 1951
Rifleman  A. E. TICE 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 28 May 1951
Private T.G. MASSEY 20 R.A.0.C. 10 Infantry Workshop 30 May 1951
Marine K. WYETH 19 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 30 May 1951
Marine R. NICHOLLS   Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 31 May 1951
Private M.C.W.J. PENROSE 24 1 Glosters 01 June 1951
Private H. E. CLIFTON 20 1 K.S.L.I. 01 June 1951
Private E. A. MILLER 24 1 K.S.L.I. 01 June 1951
Corporal W. DAVIDSON 24 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 01 June 1951
2nd Lieutenant T. E. WATERS GC 22 West Yorkshire att 1 Glosters 01 June 1951
Private T.W.A. DAVEY 21 1 K.S.L.I. 02 June 1951
Private G.R. HARRIS 19 1 Glosters 05 June 1951
Pilot 3 S.W.E. FORD - Royal Navy HMS Glory 812 Sqn 05 June 1951
2nd Lieutenant E.W. MARTIN 21 1 Middlesex 07 June 1951
Private W.J. DONALDSON 29 1 Glosters 09 June 1951
               Private A.H. MOSELEY 31 A.C.C. att 1 Glosters 12 June 1951
une 1951


-- 48 -

 CASUALTIES IN KOREA

following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

THE ROYAL NORFOLK REGIMENT - WOUNDED -
Private E.G. Shields.

THE KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS - KILLED -
Private T. Stark.

WOUNDED - Lance Corporal D. Goodair, Private W. Smith.

THE KING'S SHROPSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY - WOUNDED -
Private A.T. Wilders, Private KM. Smith, Private J.W. Foster.

© The Times, 15th March 1951


BRITISH CASUALTIES IN KOREA

The Admiralty announces that Lieutenant G.H. Cooles, Royal Navy,
pilot of a naval aircraft from H M S. Theseus has been reported
@missing, presumed killed, after a dive-bombing attack on a bridge in
Korea.

The following casualties in action in Korea have been notified to the
War Office:

THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT - WOUNDED -
W.O.II R.M. Budden, Corporal C. Card.

THE ARGYLL AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS -
DIED OF WOUNDS - Corporal D. Patterson.

WOUNDED - Private G. Kennedy.

© The Times, 17th March 1951


BRITONS RELEASED BY CHINESE

MARCHED FOR 17 DAYS

Three British soldiers who were captured by the Chinese in Korea
said at a Press conference at the War Office yesterday that soon after
they had been captured they set off on a march that went on day after
day, and sometimes at night as well, for the whole period of their
captivity. They estimated that they walked about 26 miles a day for
17 days. Their boots were taken from them and they had to march in
straw sandals. The men, all of the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers,
were Lance-Corporal Marvin, Fusilier F. Binns of Middlesbrough,
and Fusilier Harold Fame, of New Basford, Nottingham. They were
released about 60 miles north of Seoul.

© The Times, 22nd March 1951


BRITISH CASUALTIES IN KOREA

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

8th. HUSSARS - KILLED - Trooper A.G. Wilmott.

DIED OF WOUNDS - Trooper G.C. Costello.

 THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT -
DIED OF WOUNDS - Private W. Carroll.

THE ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - MISSING - Rifleman J. Baird.

© The Daily Telegraph, 3 1ts. March 1951


TWO BRITONS WIN KOREA AWARDS

GALLANTRY ON HILL

Captain Reginald Stanley Mardell, of Ramsgate, Kent, and Sergeant
Kenneth Eames of Brixton Hill, London, both of the Gloucestershire
Regiment, have received awards for gallantry in Korea. Captain
Ma,rdell receives the Military Cross and Sergeant Eames the Military
Medal.
During an attack on a hill Captain Mardell assumed command when
his company commander was wounded. He led a bayonet-and-
grenade assault with "great dash and gallantry," says the citation.
Sergeant Eames, in the same assault, "distinguished himself by his
fearlessness and leadership." He destroyed foremost posts whose
occupants would not surr ender

© The Daily Telegraph, 4th April 1951


41 COMMANDO RAID

New York, April 8 - On Saturday 250 British Royal Marine
Commandos, led by Lieutenant-Colonel D.B. Drysdale, taking the
enemy completely by surprise, landed on the east coast, eight miles
south of Songjin. Protected by a curtain of naval gunfire, they blew
up 1 00 yards of main railway, line, leaving a crater 16ft deep. They
encountered only token resistance during the seven hours they
remained ashore, although they were told by a civilian that there were
strong enemy forces at Songjin. Not a man of them was killed or
wounded.
©  The Times, 9th April 1951


U.N. TROOPS ADVANCE TOWARDS
HWACHON RESERVOIR

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, April 9 - As floods
receded United Nations troops have resumed their advance. A task
force went ahead in an effort to seize the Hwachon dam before the
enemy could make further use of it and had two engagements with
Communist platoons. A French patrol reached the reservoir without
opposition.
In their advance towards the reservoir yesterday United Nations
troops by-passed enemy troops in the hills south of the Pukhan river
valley where it runs from cast to west before turning abruptly south
towards Chunchon; they left it to rear elements to clear out these
pockets. Other United Nations forces drove directly toward Hwachon,
which lies four miles south-west of the reservoir, and at night-fall they
dug in below the town. They had to beat off two sharp counter-attacks
before the enemy troops withdrew to the north.
Except in this sector the long battle front was quiet yesterday.
British Commonwealth troops, led by Canadians, made new gains
against little resistance on a part of the front not specified, but
Siamese troops during yesterday morning were slowed by hostile
groups of platoon and company size employing small arms, automatic
weapons, and mortar fire. East of the Hwachon sector the enemy,
heavily attacked from the air with jellied petrol bombs, retreated from
hill positions towards Inje, just above the 38th parallel and 30 miles
inland from the Sea of Japan. With another South Korean division

- 49 -

 across the boundary there are now elements of seven American and
five south Korean divisions and a British Brigade north of the parallel.
 

© The Times, 110th. April 1951


REGIMENTS FOR KOREA

The War Office announces that Headquarters, 28th Infantry Brigade,
will relieve Headquarters, 27th Infantry Brigade in Korea. The 1ts
Battalion, The King's Own Scottish Borderers, and the 1 st Battalion,
The King's Shropshire Light Infantry will relieve the 1st. Battalion,
The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and the 1 st Battalion, The
Middlesex Regiment.
The 27th Infantry Brigade is returning to Hong Kong.
 

©  The Daily Telegraph, 1 0th. April 1951


BRITISH OVER IMJIN RIVER IN FORCE

DIFFICULT PROGRESS IN KOREAN HILLS

From Eric Downton, Daily Telegraph Special Correspondent, With
the British Forces, Korea, Thursday - As part of the Eighth Army's
sustained aggressive effort, British troops are now in action on two
fronts. The 27th Commonwealth Brigade has gained several more
miles and occupied a group of hills north of the 38th Parallel on the
sector northwest of Chunchon.
The 29th Brigade is across the lmjin River in force north of Seoul.
Resistance encountered by both brigades so far has been light.
On each of these fronts during the past week, 1 have seen how the
heartbreaking terrain and fickle weather, rather than Communist
soldiers, have been the main obstacles. But there were indications
to-night that the United Nations forces might run into stiffer
opposition soon.

ENEMY IN BUNKERS
For example from an observation post near Australian positions
we could see men of a veteran American division attacking against
considerable opposition above Yongpyong. They used flame-throwers
to force the Communists out of bunkers constructed of logs, turf and
stones on the mountainsides.
Across on the Eastern front, other American forces reported
encountering heavy machine-gun, small-arms and mortar fire south-
east of Hwachon. The 27th Brigade, which as already announced, is
to be withdrawn from Korea shortly, has been making a gruelling
advance height by height.
Their casualty list in this operation has been remarkably light. The
Middlesex men captured three heights several miles inside North
Korean territory, while Australians and Canadians took nearby ridges.

SOME BACKGROUND
The terrain where the Commonwealth Brigade is operating recalls
the wilder corners of the Black Forest or Thuringia. But here the bills
are higher, rising to 3,00Oft. The valleys are narrower, bleaker and
stonier.
Even the mountain streams seem to carry an air of foreboding.
Goethe's "Walpurgis Night" might well be enacted among the grey
rocks, and there is something Wagnerian about the summits, draped
with trailing mists and driving rain-clouds, while the valleys echo
and flash to the busy artillery.
Toiling up the steep slopes through thick pine-woods, Australians,
Canadians and Middlesex eventually reached the crests. Sometimes
we could see bren-gunners firing at positions from which concealed
Chinese gave sporadic bursts of small-arms fire.
Mortar-bombs exploded near our sweating files. Two Canadian
snipers, peering through telescopic sights, picked away at a stealthy
foe. One of these snipers, with a remarkable shot across the valley,

 brought down a Communist who tried to run from a fox-hole to a
trench.
On the hills, we found deserted bunkers, trenches and observation
posts, only recently evacuated. Men, hot from the arduous climb, set.
tled down to a freezing vigil. Thick mists slowed down the progress
of companies working their way along the ridges.
Back in the valley 1 found Brigadier Bourke, newly appointed
Commander of the 27th Brigade, supervising operations at a forward
command post. Between discussion of reports by field telephone, he
speculated pessimistically on the possibilities of fly-fishing in the hill
rivers.

RESERVES TRUDGE ON
Leading back from the command post was a treacherous track,
compounded, it seemed, of equal parts of mud, brackish water and
jagged stones. Along this moved a tenuous file. There were reserve
companies trudging forward.
One realised how rare it is to see a Commonwealth soldier in a
helmet, in contrast with the Americans who have to wear helmets
even deep in the rear.
Behind them came lines of Korean bearers, with loads stacked high
on wood frames. Then came the Indian field ambulance, with drivers
in parachutists' red berets.
Liaison teams from New Zealand and American batteries which are
putting down supporting fire edged past engineers blasting a fresh
road out of the hillsides. American negroes searched for mines with
long-handled detectors.

PEASANTS RETURN
Korean peasants were already back working in the meagre fields or
erecting timber frames for new dwellings above the heaps of cinders
and debris that had been a quiet hamlet before the war came this way,
Westward, along roads thick with American convoys taking men and
supplies to the battle-zone, 1 drove to the lmjin River front, where the
British 29th Brigade have a sector. 1 watched the Gloucesters make a
night crossing to the north bank.
The blacked-out column moved through a valley dominated by dark
overhanging crags. While they forded the river artillery kept up a
steady harassing fire against possible Chinese positions. Flares threw
a pale glow on the low storm-clouds.
Other units across the lmjin include the Royal Ulster Rifles, who
made the initial crossing, and some heavy tanks. Retreating Chinese
and North Korean rearguards have not yet offered more than light and
scattered opposition.

© The Daily Telegraph, 13th April 1951



KOREA CASUALTIES

The Admiralty regrets to announce that Pilot Ill Ralph Henry
Johnson, of Portobello, Scotland, has been reported missing presumed."'
killed following an operational flight over Korea on April 1 0. Next of,-
kin have been informed.
The following Royal Marines of No.41 Independent Commando,
serving in Korea, and previously reported missing, are now officially ,
recognized as being prisoners of war in North Korean hands from
November 29:

Marine R.J. Needs, (Bristol); Corporal Frederick Beadle, (Battersea);
Marine W.E. Brown, (South Sheilds); Marine Raymond Ogle,
(Sheffield); Marine Kenneth Wyeth, (Plumstead); Marine Rcuben
Nicholls, (Coalville).

These names were included in a casualty list issued on December 7.

© The Times, 14th April 1951

- 50 -

 STRICT CENSORSHIP

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, April 13 -  It was reported
late today that large Communist concentrations are being bui It up
north of Yanggu in an apparent attempt to stabilize a new defence line
ad of Hwachon reservoir.
Strict censorship which has been cloaking the operations, particular-
in the area of the Hwachon reservoir, was extended to-day to
~ the deletion of references to the nationality of the allied troops
in action. It is understood that this will be the policy to be followed
the new commander of the United States Eighth Army,
Lieutenant-General Van Fleet.

© The Times, 14th April 1951


NAVAL CASUALTY IN KOREA

The Admiralty announces that Lieutenant G.H. Cooles, Royal
Navy, pilot of a naval aircraft from H. MS. Theseus has been reported
missing, presumed killed, after a dive-bombing attack on a bridge in
Korea.

© The Times, 14th April 1951


GALLANTRY IN KOREA

A number of awards for gallant and distinguished services in Korea
wm published in last night's London Gazette. They include two
aw" of the Distinguished Service Order, four of the Military Cross,
Aye of the Military Medal, and one of the bar to the Distinguished
Flying Cross.
The awards include:

D.S.O. - Major Reginald Michael Pratt, The Royal Northumberland
Fusiliers; Major John Kirkpatrick Hay Shaw, the Royal Ulster Rifles.

M.C.. - Captain Cecil William Bowen, Royal Army Medical Corps;
Second Lieutenant Houston Mark Shaw-Stewart, The Royal Ulster
Rifles; Lieutenant David John Manner, Australian Military Forces;
Captain Archer Paterson Denness, Australian Military Forces.

Bar to the D.F.C. - Squadron Leader John Ernest Proctor, General
Duties Branch, Royal Air Force.

M3L - Fusilier James Baden Barker, The Royal Northumberland
Fusilier; Sergeant (acting) Henry Adams Campbell, The Royal Ulster
Rifles; Sergeant (acting) John Pilcher, The Royal Northumberland
@Fusiliers; Gunner Herbert James Spraggs, Royal Regiment of
Artillery; Private Charlie Francis McMurray, Australian Military

© The Times, ]8th April 1951


CASUALTIES IN KOREA

Thie following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

ROYAL ENGINEERS - Other Ranks - WOUNDED -
Sapper P.W. Arnold, Sapper W. Pashley.

THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - Officer - WOUNDED
-Lieutenant A.R. Norrish.

THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT - Other Rank - WOUNDED -
Private D. Allchin.

 THE ARGYLL AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS - Officers
- KI LLED - 2nd Lieutenant M.J.D. Cawthorn, Lieutenant J.A.C.
Milner (Dorsets, art A. and S.H.).

Other Ranks - WOUNDED - Private D. Gilks (R. Leic. art A. and
S.H.), Private D.M. Livie, Private M.P. Lee, Private L. Young
(K.S.L.I. art A. and S.H.).

© The Times, 21st April 1951


AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY IN KOREA

The London Gazette announced last night that the King had
approved the following awards for gallant and distinguished services
in Korea:

MILITARY CROSS - Captain Arthur Roxburghe, Royal New
Zealand Artillery.

MILITARY MEDAL - Private Leslie Raymond Cobby, The
Middlesex Regiment.

© The Times, 21st. April 1951


QUICK CHINESE WITHDRAWAL

TACTICAL AIMS IN KOREA

From Our Military Correspondent - Though the Chinese have
been yielding ground in Korea for some time, the process has lately
quickened. On Wednesday Eighth Army patrols and small columns
with armour met no rearguards as during the previous four days.
General Ridgway's communiqué stated that resistance was
"negligible," and the only sign of a stand was at the Hwachon
reservoir. Then, on Thursday, troops of the Eighth Army entered
Hwachon and the enemy gave up his defence of the reservoir.
A strong force - as distinct from a patrol the previous day
advanced to within three miles of Chorwon, which has for long been
described as a focus of resistance. One little engagement north of
Inje, half-way between Hwachon and the sea, ended with retreat of
a hostile battalion in face of an attack by South Korean troops.
It is now suggested by officers in Tokyo that the Chinese will stand
on the line Chorwon-Kumwha, earlier described as a main line of
resistance, but perhaps only for a delaying action. If this proved true it
would represent a marked revision of the enemy's plans, at all events
as formerly interpreted.

THREE POSSIBILITIES
In groping for the significance of the Chinese policy, at least three
possibilities appear. First, they may be attempting enticement with a
view to dealing a heavier blow by means of a preliminary shortening
of their own communications, and perhaps hoping that the United
Nations forces will becomes less well balanced and more vulnerable
as the peninsula widens.
Secondly, they may have suffered such damage that they have no
choice but to make these withdrawals. If so, this must be largely due
to attacks from the air and, in lesser degree, artillery action, for the
good reason that the infantry of the Eighth Army has not lately been
in touch with more than rearguards, small at that, so could in no way
be responsible for the infliction of heavy damage.
Thirdly, the expected spring offensive may be a myth. This,
however, would mean that there had been not only a complete
misapprehension by the United Nations and Eighth Army commands
but also a complete change of attitude on the part of the enemy.
Hitherto he has attacked when he could.
Thus, although few remarkable events have been finding a place in
the Korean war news, the situation is interesting. In the region of

- 51 -

 Chorwon the Eighth Army Front is now nearly 90 miles north of the
line of the farthest retreat of its left flank in early January - and
incidentally some 14 miles north of the 38th parallel. That at least
represents an extra task for the Chinese if they cling to their intention
of "driving the invader out of Korea." The situation has improved for
the Eighth Army to a far greater extent than can be measured by
mileage. Yet the future looks no less obscure.

© The Times, 21st. April 1951


ENEMY OFFENSIVE OPENED

LIMITED GAINS AND HEAVY LOSSES

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, April 23 - The Chinese
and the North Koreans opened their long-awaited offensive on
Sunday night (Korean time). After their heaviest artillery preparation
of the war, they attacked all along a 1 00-mile front from Korangpo, in
the west, 30 miles from Seoul, to Inje, 25 miles inland from the Sea
of Japan. They were met by a much greater concentration of fire from
the ground and the air, which mowed them down by thousands, and,
except at the western end of the front, they made no important gains.
But in the west, on a front of 15 miles, they forced a crossing of the
lmjin in river.
The defenders of the area withdrew and broke contact, and to their
right other allied troops withdrew to below the Hantan river to
straighten the line. But they took their time about it, and systematic-
ally blew up the bridges behind them.

UNEXPLOITED DENTS
On the central front United Nations forces stood firm all through
Sunday night and this morning, moving back a little here and there,
but only to take up more advantageous positions. During the night
they kept the battlefield in a glare of searchlights and flares dropped
from aircraft. Farther to the east, in the Inje area, the Communists
made some dents in the allied lines, but apparently were unable to
exploit them.
News of the enemy offensive was held back by the censorship for
more than 14 hours, and then only incomplete accounts of the fighting
were released. According to these the fighting was less intense after
this morning, but the attacks were resumed to-night.
Many thousands of casualties were inflicted on the enemy in the first
day's fighting. The air forces alone claimed to have killed 1,800
Communists, and fire from massed artillery took a much heavier toll.
A late report said that after the Communists had forced a crossing of
the lmjin river, allied troops, apparently South Koreans, threw up new
defences south of the river. It was on the right flank of these troops
that the allies made their biggest withdrawal, in a movement to
straighten the line. In this area, where they had advanced to 12 miles
above the 38th parallel, they fell back to positions just below it.
Their advance had carried them to within four miles of Chorwon.
After their withdrawal they were in the positions from which they
started their advance four days ago.
Fragmentary accounts which passed the censorship spoke of bitter
fighting north of the Hwachon reservoir, in which the enemy was
repulsed, and of the repulse later in the day of two enemy battalions
which struck south-west of Hwachon. This engagement seemed to
indicate that there had been some allied withdrawal from the reservoir
area. Another report spoke of the sinking by artillery fire of boats
containing Communists attempting to cross the reservoir.
Intelligence officers were not agreed whether this was the expected
major effort of the enemy or something less. It had been their belief
that the big offensive would begin in the rainy season, but this assault
was launched in dry weather, when the allies were at no disadvantage,
either on the ground or in the air. Moreover, though the Communists
were reported to have 3,000 Russian-made aircraft available in
Manchurian airfields across the Yalu River, they made no attempt to
support their forces with aircraft, and allied aircraft were having a
field day, "raising hell," as they said, with the enemy infantry.

Their  estimate of the enemy's strength varied from 400,000 to 700,000, with
the largest battle-front concentration to the west of the centre.
In a field headquarters communiqué issued at 1 1 a.m. yesterday
(G.M.T.), the Eighth Army reported that United Nations forces were
retreating southwards in good order on the west and central fronts
under the attacks of elements of four Chinese armies.

© The Times, 24th April 1951


STRETCHER BEARER AWARDED
MILITARY MEDAL

Private Leslie Raymond Cobby, I st Battalion, The Middlesex
Regiment (D.C.O.) Has been given an immediate award of the
Military Medal.
The citation states that during the night of February 14-15, 1951,
his company was in action in Korea, considerably outnumbered and
suffering casualties. Private Cobby, a stretcher bearer, moved from
trench to trench administering morphine, dressing wounds, and
collecting casualties together for evacuation. His courage and determi-
nation under fire set a fine example of devotion to duty.

© The Times, 24th April 1951


CHINESE PENETRATE ALLIED LINE

The Communist attack in Korea is described by Lieutenant-General
Ridgway as the greatest they have yet launched, and he has given a
warning that its full strength has probably not yet been met. United
Nations forces have yielded ground all along the 1 00-mile front,
except at one point, but are expected soon to have an opportunity to
strike back.

© The Times, 25th April 1951


HEAVY ENEMY LOSSES

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, April 24 - Communist
troops, attacking in overwhelming numbers, yesterday drove a deep
wedge into the United Nations lines on the central Korean front,
overran Inje, at the eastern end of the line, and in the west drove
across the lmjin River. Officers who are in the front line described
the situation as serious, but commanders at headquarters remained
confident that the enemy tide could be stemmed.
Lieutenant-General Ridgway, visiting the front, said that the battle
might "well prove decisive." The offensive was the greatest the
enemy had yet launched, and he gave a warning that the Allies had
probably not yet met its full strength.
The enemy struck hardest in the Chorwon-Kumhwa-Hwachon
triangle. There, with a cavalry division mounted on Mongolian ponies
in the forefront, he drove into a demoralized retreat of South Korean
elements, exposing the flanks of other allied troops. Energetically
pursuing their advantage, the communists deepened and widened this
wedge south of the 38th parallel to the west of Chunchon, and near
Kapyong, 12 miles south of the parallel, Chinese cavalry and infantry
cut the paved road from Chunchon to Seoul, Whether they took @l
Kapyong is not yet known.
East of the break-through, around Hwachon Reservoir, United
Nations forces held their ground, but apparently it was only there,
along the 1 00-mile front that they made no withdrawals. Though
outflanked, they beat off repeated attacks at Hwachon, at the western
end of the reservoir. Eleven miles farther east they gave a little
ground, but continued to hold Yanggu, which, like Hwachon, is seven
miles north of the 38th parallel.

- 52 -



 ESTIMATED CASUALTIES
end of the line, across the peninsula, elements of
two Chinese forced a United Nations withdrawal near
of the border and 30 miles north of Seoul. An
Eighth said last night that the enemy casualties
e of United Nations forces. On the eastern front
d that the enemy losses there were 20 times greater
lies. Eighth Army headquarters estimated the
on Monday alone at 12,000, about one-fourth of
by air attacks.
s that about 250,000 of the 400,000 Chinese and
estimated to be in the advanced areas in Korea
in the present fighting and that 40,000, or more,
break-through of the South Korean lines on the

rmed reports in Washington to-day that
had entered North Korea, but these may have been,
weeks, mere rumours.
the front said that by nightfall yesterday the allies
all along the line west of the breakthrough and
line below the Hantan River. Their withdrawal
and made without loss of artillery or vehicles.
or, allied forces, abandoning their lmjin River
to plan, withdrew from one to nine miles. One
by the Chinese on the north bank of the
ut with support from tanks and from the air, it



ith the loss of only two vehicles. The infantry
ere only waist deep, and tanks and vehicles crossed
me by pontoon bridge.
report yet of the enemy using any aircraft, except
Tuesday an unidentified rwo-engined bomber
from an altitude of 10,00Oft., behind the allied
they did no damage to military traffic or

© The Times, 25th April 1951


CHINESE ADVANCE CONTINUES

rces continued to withdraw yesterday in the face
sive in Korea, but counter-attacks were made and

Van fleet, commander of the Eighth Army, issued
e day to his troops.

(0 The Times, 26th April 1951


ENEMY 25 MILES FROM SEOUL

ndent, New York, April 25 - Communist
-day against the western half of the Korean battle-
d against United Nations troops who were making
thdrawals. At the western end of the front swarms
loiting their lmjin river crossing, advanced to
coul, from which civilians were again hurriedly
But the bulk of the Chinese forces in the west
sic invasion route, the highway running south-
through Uijongbu to Seoul. All day long they
d by allied fighters and bombers.
road, to reduce the danger of attacks on their left
s forces made a swift withdrawal out of contact
took up new positions north of the highway from
Chunchon which runs southwestwards to Seoul. A report yesterday
aid that the Chinese had cut this highway near Kapyong, 18 or 20
@ west of Chunchon, but this seems to have been premature.
They approached the highway, but apparently did not get closer than
,bz miles north of it in any force.

 COMMUNISTAMBUSH
Some allied rear units were trapped during this withdrawal on the
west-central front. One was ambushed just east of the Kurnhwa-
Uijongbu road by disguised Communist soldiers, some wearing the
white clothes of civilians, some blue denim as South Korean supply
bearers.
Farther to the east, on the central front, reinforced allied units
counter-attacked the Communists who had driven the deepest wedge
into their lines and halted them seven miles south of the 38th parallel.
One of the heaviest counter-attacks was made against enemy forces
streaming down the main road to Chunchon, where a fierce battle
which began early in the morning was still raging in mid-aftemoon.
South-west of Hwachon, which the allies abandoned yesterday, the
enemy was met with heavy artillery fire and a frontal counter-attack,
and their flank was hit hard by another allied force which had with-
drawn from the town. At the eastern end of the Hwachon reservoir an
enemy force attacking Yanggu was stopped dead, and to the south-
east of Yanggu an allied tank column re-entered Inje, which the
communists abandoned to take up positions in the neighbouring hills.
A front line dispatch said that the allies had apparently stabilized their
line in that area.

(0 The Times, 26th April 1951


ORDER OF THE DAY TO EIGHTH ARMY

COMMANDER'S CONFIDENCE IN VICTORY

From Our Own C@rrespondent, New York,, April 25 - Lieutenant-
General Van Fleet, commander of the Eighth Army, has issued an
order of the day praising the United Nations troops in superlative
terms for the way in which they have withstood the enemy's great
assault, and expressed General Ridgway's and his own complete
confidence in their ultimate victory. His order read:

To the heroic soldiers of all ranks of the United Nations ground
forces in Korea:
On Sunday night, April 22, the enemy launched his expected attack -
the start of a third round of unprovoked ruthless aggression. He has
seen fit to drive masses into the battle without regard to loss in lives.
Again you have willingly accepted the challenge, and in battle have
proven your superiority.
The magnificent support of our United Nations air and navy forces
will continue to strengthen our hearts and bolster our arms.
During my first 10 days as your new commander, by personal
contact with you at the front, 1 have learned of your peerless qualities,
of your professional skill, deterirnination high courage, and intelligent
leadership, found only in an enlightened army of freedom-loving
nations. In addition, the Eighth Army at present enjoys the advantage
of uncontested friendly naval and air superiority, of enormous superi-
ority in fire-power and all types of weapons, in fact, tremendous
superiority in everything except numbers.
You are fighting to stop armed aggression and to bring peace, not
only in Korea, but in your respective homelands. This renewed
battle is for the preservation of life, liberty and the right of pursuit
of happiness in all free men. These are fundamental in the life of man
- the rock upon which our civilization is founded - and the first thing
which Communism denies its own people.
The time has come when all men of the free world must steel their
souls to face a desperate, bitter, and uncompromising battle with
armed Communist aggression. Our strength rests on the solid founda-
tion of belief in God and the rights of man, rather than on the will of
dictators imposed through cruelty and complete disregard of human
life. General Ridgway and 1 have complete confidence in your
ultimate victory. We all ask for divine guidance and God's blessing
for a righteous victory.

(0 The Times 26th April 1951

- 53 -


 HEAVY BRITISH LOSSES IN KOREA

GLOUCESTERS HARD HIT IN 4-DAY BATTLE

From Denis Warner Daily Telegraph special Correspondent, U.N.
Command H. Q., Tokyo, Saturday morning - Detailed accounts are
now available of the four-day stand on the lmjin River front in West
Korea by troops of the British 29th Brigade. They were given by
survivors of the Gloucester battalion who have been trickling back
to the United Nations line.
The Gloucesters' losses in the engagement, the most desperate
fought by British troops in Korea, are officially described as very
heavy. Less than a company have so far returned, but hope is still
held for a good many of the remainder.
The British stand upset the Chinese timetable, but last night the
Communists were reported about 10 miles from Seoul. One enemy
column was fighting round Uijongbu, and the second south of Munsan
- both on direct roads to the capital.
Captain M.G. Harvey, of Portsmouth, led the first detachment of 50
of the Gloucesters to safety late on Thursday. With ammunition spent
and equipment discarded, his dust-stained group of men brought only
their rifles, which they had refused to throw away.
The Gloucesters' ordeal began on Sunday night, when Communist
bugle-calls on the west bank of the lmjin River announced the
beginning of the spring offensive. Forward patrols on the cast bank
watched the Chinese form up.
Artillery temporarily broke the Communist formations. Survivors
said it was moonlight and they could watch the shells falling, but the
Communists reformed and began to wade the river in hundreds.
Many died in the river from the small-arms fire of the forward
patrols, who withdrew only when their ammunition was spent. On the
high ground overlooking the river the battalion awaited the attack.

BRITISH HOLD FIRE
Chinese Withdraw - The men held their fire until the Communists
were moving up slopes, then let go with mortars, heavy and light
machine-guns, rifles, sub-machine-guns and grenades. In face of this
concentrated and sustained fire the enemy swung to the flanks.
In the darkness before dawn the Chinese consolidated in preparation
for a daylight attack. It came at dawn, but the Gloucesters, as they
were to do many times in the succeeding days, held their ground.
By nine o'clock it was almost victory. The Chinese withdrew,
leaving hundreds of dead behind. During the afternoon, however,
infiltrators moved deep into 29th Brigade territory and cut the
Gloucesters' lines of communications. Machine-gun posts, reinforced
by platoons of infantry stopped all movement along the road to the
rear.
At night came the second major attack. It came from both left and
right flanks and the Gloucesters moved to a hill where they formed a
tight all-round perimeter which was now attacked from all sides.

SUPPLIES LOW
Planes Drop Ammunition - Daylight enemy attacks continued
all Tuesday, but supplies had become low. That night low-flying
American planes parachuted to the heroic battalion desperately
needed small-arms ammunition, but only enough food for one can
of rations to each man.
On Wednesday the troops heard a tank relief column on its way and
the Chinese began to show understandable reluctance to come to close
quarters. But late that day the commander, Lieutenant-Colonel J.P.
Came, told his company commanders that the situation was desperate
and companies were ordered to fight their way out.
The battalion bugler sounded Reveille and, said Captain Harvey, it
had a wonderful effect upon morale. The Gloucesters started cheering.
Colonel Came, his chaplain and doctor stayed with battalion H.Q.
They planned to be the last to leave the hill and thus give the compa-
nies the best chance to begin withdrawal.

TANKS OPEN FIRE
Plane Corrects Error - Captain Harvey and his men went north for
a mile before turning west and then south. When they were still a mile

 from United Nations lines they ran into a heavy Communist ambush,
The troops scattered into ditches and paddy-fields and wormed their
way on their stomachs before the Communists supplemented their
machine-guns with mortars. Even this was not the end of their mis-
fortunes. American tank crews sent to the rescue thought the ragged
soldiers coming along the hills were Chinese and opened fire.
A low-flying spotter plane saved this situation. Troops stood up and
waved to the pilot when he flew over them and the plane in turn
dropped a message to the tanks to hold fire. When the tank turned
their guns on the Communists the Gloucesters got to their feet and
ran, waving and shouting, across the paddy-fields to their rescuers.
To-day they are now safely behind the lines, watching and waiting
for their friends to arrive. In ones, twos, and small groups they are
beginning to come back.
One small group of the Gloucesters, led by 2nd Lieutenant David
Holdsworth, of Lych Gate, Wirral, Cheshire, walked back to the
Allied lines with South Korean soldiers.
Along the whole front yesterday there was little indication that the
tremendous casualties inflicted by the United Nations air and ground
forces had yet begun seriously to affect the Communist offensive.
The advance south is no lightning thrust but it is making steady
progress.
The South Korean Government ordered the evacuation of Seoul for
the third time as the noise of guns from the battle raging around
Uijongbu, only 1 1 miles north, could clearly be heard in the city.
Reports from Seoul said that 400,000 civilians had begun the
desperate trek south across the Han River.
Ground haze restricted United Nations air support during the day.
Heavy fighting was reported south of Munsan, where the second
finger of the Communist drive to Seoul also made some progress.
On the eastern front the allies abandoned Yanggu, the last important
centre they held in North Korea.
Lieutenant-General Van Fleet, Eighth Army commander, visiting the
front yesterday, predicted that his forces would hold the Communists
North of the Han River.

(0 The Daily Telegraph, 26th April 1951


CHINESE WITHIN 18 MILES OF SEOUL

EMPIRE TROOPS FILLED GAP IN
ANZAC DAY BATTLE

From Denis Warner Daily Telegraph Special Correspondent, U.X
Command, H. Q., Tokyo, Friday Chinese Communists advanced to
within 18 miles of Seoul yesterday. United Nations forces continued
their generally orderly withdrawal along the entire Korean front.
Two Communist drives along the Munsan and Uijongbu highways
directly threaten the shattered remains of Seoul. A third force
estimated at 100,000, yesterday attacked Chunchon, possibly with
the intention of driving along the lateral road to the capital.
Delayed reports to-night told of the splendid part played on
Wednesday and yesterday by the Commonwealth 27th and 29th
Brigades. In the central sector the 27th Brigade staved off disaster
when a South Korean division broke before Chinese infantry and
cavalry.
Australians and New Zealanders fighting together as one unit -and
on Anzac Day - combined in what the Americans described as one
of the most gallant actions of the campaign, the brigade filled a 10-
mile gap. New Zealand artillery firing from close range killed
hundreds of Communists and then Australian infantry went in with
bayonets.
[The 27thBrigade at this time was made up of Ist Battalion The
Middlesex Regiment, 2nd Battalion Princess Patricia @ Canadian
Light Infantry, 3rd Battalion Royal Australian Regiment, ]6th New
Zealand Field Regiment, - and supporting arms. The Australians and
Canadians played a decisive role in the battle. Both battalions were to
receive the United States Presidential Unit Citation for this action.
The Brigade @ fourth battalion, Ist Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland

- 54 -

 

on their way to Inchon where they would board
ich would take them back to Hongkong. Their
Ist Bn. King @ Own Scottish Borderers, were
War diary at 1945 hrs 25th April as having
and being placed in close perimeter defence of
,MgadeHeadquartersfor the night. - PatrickLohan)

0 The Daily Telegraph, 2 7th April 1951


CHINESE THREAT TO SEOUL

U.N. TROOPS WITHDRAW ALONG WHOLE LINE

Tw general withdrawal of United Nations troops in Korea yesterday
b~t them to a line less than 20 miles north of Seoul.
To story of how a battalion of The Gloucestershire Regiment,
Mkh was surrounded with the British 29th Brigade, bore the brunt
#f dbe Chinese assault for 80 hours has now been released by the
O~P.

ENEMY'S HEAVY LOSSES

Fmm Our Own Correspondent, New York, April 26 - Reinforced
Chinese troops on the Korean west front, disregarding their formida-
bk losses, have pressed to within 20 miles of Seoul down the high-
wAy from the north-west through Munsan, which was abandoned to
bm ~ay. It was near Munsan that American parachute troops
m* a spectacular landing behind enemy lines last month.
fift= miles to the east another enemy force is driving towards
&M along the main invasion route running through Uijongbu, where
h is joined by the highway from Kumhwa, the enemy's base behind
tk central front; and between these two forces other Chinese
elements are trying to make their way south through more difficult
wotry.

HEAVY TOLL
United Nations forces in these areas, as everywhere else on the
w~ front, have withdrawn south of the 38th parallel, shortening
@ supply lines and lengthening the enemy's. The toll taken by
their artillery and air attacks is greatly in excess of their own losses.
Famy losses since the beginning of the offensive on Sunday were
wbated yesterday at 30,000 in killed and wounded.
The allies have retreated about six miles on the road toward
Uijongbu to a point south of Changgo, which is four miles south of
die 38th parallel and 15 miles north of Uijongbu. Some of their units
were temporarily cut off, but fought their way out with comparatively
losses. Among these were Australian, Belgian and Turkish
dements. Another unit, which was cut off north-west of Uijongbu by
be or more Chinese divisions, was less fortunate. An armoured task
force rescued about 1 00 men by breaking through the encirclement,
but had to retire before it could help the remainder

SMOKE AND HAZE
United Nations forces have also been making a slow withdrawal in
ffie central front area above Kapyong, where they have been contain-
ing the enemy, and have made a similar withdrawal in the Hwachon-
Yanggu salient in the north-east, after holding out there since Sunday.
But Yanggu last night was still in their hands. To-day they beat back
enemy attacks on both sides of the Hwachon reservoir.
Heavy smoke and haze hung over the battle area to-day and aircraft
wore unable to give as much support to the troops as on some
previous days. Their pilots nevertheless claimed to have inflicted
550 casualties during the day.

GLOUCESTERS BEAR THE BRUNT
STORY OF AN 80-HOUR BATTLE
The censors to-day permitted disclosure of some heroic actions
by United Nations units. Outstanding among these was that of the
WWion of The Gloucester Regiment fighting with the British 29th

 Brigade. When the Chinese waded across the shallow lmjin river on
Sunday night the brunt of their attack fell on this battalion. Cut off,
and surrounded, without food or water, it fought for 80 hours.
The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers, on their right, went to their
help - still with the roses in their helmets with which they had been
celebrating St. George's Day - but the Chinese drove in between
them. Throughout Monday night the Chinese attacked on every side,
screaming, blowing bugles, ringing bells, and clashing cymbals. But
the Gloucesters held them and fought back, giving not an inch of
ground.

COMMANDER'S ORDER
A battalion from the Philippines fought fiercely in an attempt to
break through to their relief, but failed. On Tuesday afternoon a
column of British tanks similarly failed. The officer commanding the
Gloucesters thereupon sent for his company commanders and ordered
them to break out with their men as best they could. The battalion
commander, the chaplain, and the medical officer stayed behind with
the wounded.
One company decided to fight its way north then west. An
Associated Press correspondent, flying over the enemy lines saw them
walking north through the mountains, straight into the Chinese lines.
He said that some of them escaped to safety, but nobody knows how
many. Others were eventually rescued by a tank column which broke
through from the south.
There were many other notable deeds, including Turkish bayonet
charges in an area that has not been identified, and the saving of the
day by Australians and New Zealanders of the 27th Brigade when
South Koreans broke under a tremendous communist assault west of
Hwachon, which drove a deep wedge in the United Nations lines.
But the story of these has yet to be released to the world.

(c) The Times, 27th Al)ril 1951


THESEUS ON WAY HOME

H.MS. Theseu.@, the light fleet carrier, is on her way back to the
United Kingdom from the Far East. An Admiralty announcement said
that during her operations in Korean waters the carrier had steamed
more than 36,000 miles and had expended more than half a million
rounds of cannon shells and machine-gun bullets and 1,390 5001b.
bombs against enemy targets.

(C The Times, 2 7th April 1951


ALLIED WITHDRAWAL FROM UIJONGBU

United Nations forces in Korea have withdrawn to the south of
Uijongbu, 1 1 miles from Seoul. On the eastern part of the front they
have abandoned Yanggu and withdrawn south of the 38th parallel.
General Van Fleet has declared his confidence that the enemy can be
held north of the Han river. He said that tremendous toll was being
taken by the allies, whose own losses were light.

RETREAT IN GOOD ORDER
From Our Own Correspondent, New York, April 2 7 - United
Nations troops have fallen back at both ends of the Korean front
while continuing to fight a stubborn delaying action. In the west five
enemy divisions are advancing southward towards Seoul along the
road from Munsan and along the historic invasion route 15 miles to
the east, and the allies have withdrawn below Uijongbu, 1 1 miles
from Seoul. In the east they have given up Yanggu and have retired
south of the 38th parallel.
Enemy pressure is greatest in the west. His masses keep driving on,
in spite of point-blank artillery fire in some places and continuous air
attacks, paying, as elsewhere on the long front, a fearful price in
killed and wounded. At the eastern end of the central front allied

- 55 -

 forces yesterday beat back four night attacks, and in the central area
they held firm against lighter attacks.

NO PERMANENT LINE
Lieutenant-General Van fleet made an unannounced visit to the front
yesterday. He was asked whether he believed that the Eighth Army
could hold the enemy north of the Han river, which runs along the
southern side of Seoul. He replied emphatically: "I do." He said that
the allies had not established a permanent line of defence, and their
withdrawal was continuing. He was keeping on with the war of
manoeuvre planned by Lieutenant-General Ridgway. "We are keeping
units intact. We are taking a tremendous toll of the enemy, while
enduring only minimum losses ourselves."
The allied troops, withdrawing in heavy rain, broke contact with the
enemy over most sectors of the front to-day, while thousands of fresh
Chinese troops moved into the battle area to replace their hard-hit and
exhausted frontline forces.
At Eighth Army headquarters to-night it was stated that an important
highway running north-east out of Seoul to Chunchon, on the central
front, was still in allied hands. Two probing attacks were repulsed
west of Kapyong, on that road, which the allies are defending from
new positions. South of the Hwachon reservoir allied elements with-
drew seven miles to avoid flanking attacks after their abandonment of
Yanggu, at the east end of the reservoir. Only on the east coast are
there any United Nations troops still north of the parallel. There,
South Koreans were reported to-day to be in contact with about 600
of the enemy.
Bad weather reduced air operations, but fighters and light bombers
made 363 sorties.

(Q The Times, 28th April 1951


THE CRITICAL STAGE APPROACHING

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, April 27 - The Chinese
are still thrusting towards Seoul, in the main by the Uijongbu and
Munsan roads, down which they moved when they previously
captured the city. It would seem, however, that the Eighth Army's
withdrawal has now become more deliberate and under control.
The offensive is now reaching its critical stage. Up to the present
the immense energy and dash which the Chinese put into their
attacks have on each occasion begun to evaporate within a week of
the first onset. This offensive began on Sunday night.
The fresh troops of the Chinese Third Field Army may be more
pertinacious than their predecessors - a British soldier who went
through the winter fighting is quoted as saying that the attacks were
even more determined and ferocious this time. Yet it has in all
likelihood been not lack of pertinacity, but lack of organization, in
practice lack of food and ammunition, which has previously braked
the Chinese oftensives so sharply. It is probable that on this occasion,
where their advance has been deep, they have far outrun their
artillery.

(0 The Times, 28th April 1951


CASUALTIES IN KOREA

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

8th HUSSARS - KILLED - Other Ranks - Trooper P.F. Rowley
(previously reported 'missing in action').

ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS - KILLED -
Other Ranks - Fusilier S. Ludlow.

THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - WOUNDED - Officers
- 2nd Lieutenant J.A. Haggerty.

 Other Ranks - WOUNDED - Lance Corporal J. MeArdle, Lance
Corporal W.J. Russell, Private G.A. Chamberlain, Private C.D.
Francis, Private B. Hopkins, Private F.D. Hewitt, Private D.C.
Hockley, Private R.F. Marsh, Private J.E. Mortimer (Dorsets art
Glosters), Private J.R. Tickner.

THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT - Other Ranks - WOUNDED -
Private T.J. Freeman.

THE ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - Other Ranks - WOUNDED -
Rifleman A. Green, Lance Corporal P. Alberts, (Wilts art R.U.R.).

THE ARGYLL AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS - Other
Ranks - WOUNDED - Corporal H. Saunders, Private R. McNae,
Private A. Watson, Private K. Morgan (K.O.S.B. art A. and S.H.),
Private J. Mulligan (Gordons art A. and S.H.).

ROYAL ARMY SERVICE CORPS - Other Ranks - WOUNDED -
Driver P.J. Molloy, Driver D.S. Nicholls.

C The Times, 28th April 1951


BRITISH BRIGADES'GALLANTRY

AN AMERICAN TRIBUTE

The Korean Front, April 29, - Fuller reports have become availab'@e
of the gallant actions fought by two British brigades in face of masse
Communist attacks last week.
Major-General Hoge, commander of IX Corps, to-day described as
superb the 27th Brigade's action in covering a 10-mile-wide gap in
the United Nations line north of Kapyong. The brigade was sent into
action after a South Korean division collapsed. It fought "Against
tremendous odds and did not budge an inch." Australian and Canadi
troops, who bore the brunt of the Chinese onslaught in that sector,
had, in his opinion, killed as many Chinese "as the combined strength
of two Commonwealth battalions."
New Zealand artillery was in support and took heavy toll of the
enemy. The Chinese gathered new forces for an even heavier assault
the next day, but were fought with machine-gun, rifle, grenade, and
then the bayonet. Once more they broke off the action. After covering
the withdrawal of the artillery, with all their weapons and transport,
the Australians fell back to a new line in good order.
The 29th Brigade met the full weight of the attack down the main
corridor towards Seoul, and fought the Communists to a standstill
before withdrawing in conformity with the United Nations
Commander's tactical plan. Turks and Belgians joined in actions
which it is said will make regimental history. The brigade's heaviest
losses were suffered by the Gloucestershire Regiment. - (0 Reuters

The Times, 30th April 1951


CHINESE MASS 300,000
TO ATTACK SEOUL

U.N. PULL BACK TO NEW LINE

From Denis Warner Daily Telegraph Special Correspondent, United
Nations Command H. Q., Tokyo, Sunday - Dug in behind barbed wire
entanglements on the northern approaches to Seoul, United Nations
troops to-night awaited a major Communist attack against the South
Korean capital. Light contact only was made with Chinese forces'in
the area during the day.
Intelligence reports continue to tell, however, of an enemy build-up
south of Munsan and Uijongbu and north-cast alone theseoul-
Chunchon lateral highway. The two towns and the road passed into
Communist hands over the week-end.

- 56 -

 ~tes of the forces likely to be thrown into the assault on Seoul
m as high as 300,000, made up of nine armies, each of three
&Mons. A second force of 18 divisions is thought likely to attempt
to by-pass the city in an attempt to cut the main road leading south.
@UMM Nations confidence in the outcome of the immediate battle
wn reflected in a decision to keep heavy artillery in Seoul. To-night
&m massed guns threw thousands of rounds into Chinese formations
rowing on a line down to the Han River.
Off Inchon, the port for Seoul, a cruiser task force used its 8in. guns
in ~rt. The 13,190-ton light aircraft carrier Glory, which recently
~ this force, provided the only naval air action yesterday, with
Mcks against Haeju airfield.
@g the week-end allied forces fell back on a line running
~y across the peninsula from immediately north of Seoul to
de Yangyang area, just north of the 3 8th Parallel on the east coast.
% withdrawal was orderly. Tank task forces helped back scores of
Y~ded infantrymen.
By ones and twos the survivors of the Gloucesters entered the
AM lines. They now total more than a company in strength, but
od too much hope is now held for the rest of those missing after
die battalion's stand last week.
Wg misty weather helped the Communist build-up. Expectations
are that a fresh major attack will come within the next 48 hours.
&viewing the first week of the enemy offensive yesterday,
Ue~t-General Van Fleet, the Eighth Army commander, said that
$e Communists had already suffered 70,000 casualties out of their
initial attacking force of 300,000 troops. Another 300,000 were
immediately available to be thrown into the next round of the battle.
He said that the Chinese used "human sea" tactics. Neither the
weight of attack, the direction of the main effort nor the approximate
d* were a surprise to the Eighth Army, which had disrupted the
o@ive by inflicting heavy casualties.

0 The Daily Telegraph, 30th April 1951


WITH THE 27TH AND 29TH
BRIGADES IN KOREA

By Lieutenant-General H. G. Martin,
Dai Telegraph Milita Correspondent

During my recent visit to Korea, the 29th Brigade was in Army
muse in Yongdongpo, the south-bank suburb of Seoul. The Brigade
which was designed originally to be the British Army's sole contri-
bufion to the Korean campaign, was a strong and well-founded
brigade group of all arms, built around its three battalions, the Royal
Northumberland Fusiliers, the Gloucesters and the Royal Ulster
Rifles.
Thanks to the kind welcome of Brigadier Brodie and his command-
ing officers, 1 was able to pay my respects to all its units. These units
m composed very largely of reservists - married men for the most
@ with their civilian jobs or businesses.
The C.O. of the 8th Hussars, for instance told me that his regiment
as a whole was 70 per cent. and his transport drivers 90 per cent
reservist. His officers and men came from almost every regiment of
the Royal Armoured Corps.

MORALE SKY HIGH
Morale was sky high. Commanding officers were unanimous that
never had they known finer soldiers. These reservists represent,
however, all too high a proportion of our Regular Army Reserve, and
are correspondingly precious. All had a promise that they would go
home after 12 to 18 months' Colour service, and it was understood
that most of them would be going in September.
Commanding officers were asking themselves, in consequence, how
these grand soldiers, and particularly the signallers and other special-
ists among them, were to be replaced. In view of current events,
unfortunately, this question is now posed in an even more imperative
form.

 By the end of March the real cold was over. Previously, of course,
it had been beyond description. The 29th Brigade keep green the
memory of the War Office expert in winter warfare who had come to
lecture to them before they sailed.
"You need not worry," he had told them, "Korea is not a cold
climate."

NO FIELD ALLOWANCE
That our men survived last winter almost unprovided with tents and
"space-heaters" - the Americans' ingenious petrol-stoves - was due
mainly to the fact that, having nothing to fear from enemy air or
artillery, they could generally find Korean houses in which to shelter.
Also, with their usual readiness to help, the Americans passed over
to our troops a certain number of tents and heaters; but a larger and
more regularised allotment would be necessary for another winter's
campaign.
The grant of field allowance to those serving in Korea is another
matter of urgency. When in 1945-46 the British Government
introduced their notorious post-war pay code for the Armed Forces,
they took the opportunity to abolish field allowance, announcing that
in future "extra pay for special duties" would be "absorbed in basic
rates." In other words the soldier would have to do without it. That is
not now good enough.
The men of many - perhaps all - of the other national contingents
in Korea draw special allowances. There are no amenities - nowhere
the soldier can go to relax out of the line. Winter or summer, the
climate is horrid. Service conditions have never been harder, or the
fighting more bitter.
True, in their "R. and R." scheme under which troops get five days'
leave in Japan, the Americans have generously counted in the men of
all the other contingents for air transportation; but these five days
come round only once in 10 months or so. No body of men ever
deserved their field allowance more than do our men in Korea. The
typically Whitehall prohibition will have to be reversed.

SEOUL TO THE IMJIN
Alone of the 29th Brigade, the 45th Field Regiment was then in
action, supporting the 1 st South Korean Division. 1 wished to pay the
Regiment a hurried visit; so my companion and 1 passed through
Seoul which 1 found less devastated than 1 had expected, and took the
road that leads northward to the lmjin - the road down which the
Chinese have poured once more.
Napalm had reduced perhaps every second village to a heap of black
ashes. On either hand, in an endless succession of steep, rocky ranges,
there s tehed the harsh brown-grey landscape of Korea. Every valley
bottoih'was filled by its spill of wet and terraced rice-fields.
The problem everywhere is how to get transport off the roads and
where to find gun positions. When it rains as it so often does, the
narrow mountain roads are transformed into quagmires. To pass is
then an experience; since one's vehicle must hug the road-edge, which
is all too apt to subside beneath one.
Nearly all the high-level bridges have been destroyed, and there is
not much Bailey bridging in evidence. In consequence one plunges
through a succession of fords, wondering how deep the last freshet
has made them.

MUD OR DUST
Mud or dust - you take your choice; within an hour or two of the
sky's clearing, the dust is re-appearing. Everyone inveighs against the
Korean dust, and it is certainly thick. Those of us, however, whose
memories go back to Mesopotamia in the First World War may
hesitate to award it the world title.
Somewhere short of Munsan we found the 45th Field Regiment
about to go into action. Since that day the regiment has forged fresh
bonds with its own infantry, and particularly with the Gloucesters, by
the faithful support it has given them in their desperate three-day fight
here on the lmjin.
From the 29th Brigade 1 flew to United States 9th Corps head-
quarters, where 1 was fortunate enough to renew my acquaintance
with the Corps Commander, Lieutenant-General.W.M. Huge: we
had met previously in Trieste. Next day, after General Hoge had

- 57 -

 introduced me to General Ridgway, we flew on together to the head-
quarters of the 24th Division, under command of which the 27th
Brigade then was.
We found 27th Brigade headquarters seven or eight miles up a glen
in wild rugged country that recalled the Trossachs. There 1 spent two
days with them.
Brigadier Brian Burke had recently succeeded Brigadier Coad in
command. The brigade consisted of the Middlesex and the Argylll
and Sutherland Highlanders - the two original battalions - together
with the 3rd Royal Australian Regiment, a magnificent battalion of
individualists who respect, and are respected by, both Middlesex and
Argylls; the 2nd Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry with
whom the 27th Brigade must soon part when they are embodied in the
new Canadian brigade; and the 16th Field Regiment, Royal New
Zealand Artillery, who have won the confidence and admiration of all
whom they have supported.
The Middlesex and Argylls had been hm-ried from Hongkong at the
end of August and put hastily into the Pusan bridgehead early in
September, at a time of crisis when General MacArthur had said two
battalions then and they would be worth two divisions later on.
The battalions had consisted largely of National Service men, the
proportion of these being higher in the Middlesex than in the Argylls.

SPLENDID MATERIAL
Certainly these National Service men and their almost equally young
Regular comrades have proved themselves in Korea. As the C.O. of
the Middlesex put it to me, "They have leamt to live like animals on
the mountain tops through the winter cold."
All who have seen the National Service men at it will agree that the
British army has never had finer material. It is a thousand pities that
the psychological opportunity has been missed to send these proud
and self-reliant soldiers back to their homes and Territorial drill-halls
with a campaign ribbon to display.
From Brigadier Coad himself to company commanders and warrant
officers, those in responsible positions in the original 27th Brigade
have had to bear a quite abnormal strain. The brigade so-called
consisted at first of only its two weak battalions. It had to operate on
immense fronts. Physically, conditions were extremely trying.
Though the young National Service man is splendid material, at first
he needs constant supervision, and the turnover is ceaseless. The
brigade was passing constantly from one divisional command to
another; so it was impossible to institute a divisional system of reliefs.
The Americans did all they could, but there were some inevitable
hitches. Sometimes promised transport would not arrive.

AMERICAN TRIBUTES
Thus the relief, now in progress, of the 27th by the 28th Brigade, is
a most necessary step. It is fortunate, too, that the 28th, 29th and
Canadian 25th Brigade are soon to form a Commonwealth Division,
since there is ample experience to prove that a division is the lowest
formation that can be fittingly embodied in the army of another
nation.
Long before this last Chinese offensive began the 27th and 29th
Brigades had made their name in Korea. It was a fine thing to hear
every American commander from General MacArthur downwards pay
his tribute to them.
Now the counter-offensive has come at a moment when the 27th
Brigade was in the act of pulling out; the 27th and 28th - half-in and
half-out - can be having no easy battle. Together with the 29th they
are bearing the brunt. When the battle is over, great will be their
honour - but great also their needs. These needs must not go unmet.

(0 The Daily Telegraph, 30th April 1951


CASUALTY LIST OF 371 NAMES

The War office last night issued its longest list of recent casualties in
Korea. It contained 371 names - 52 officers and 319 other ranks -

 killed, missing, or wounded. Other lists will follow at later dates, it
was stated.
Officers killed numbered nine and other ranks 35; officers missing
3 1, other ranks 1 1 1; officers wounded 12, other ranks 173.
The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers are listed as having the greates
number of casualties, their total of killed, missing, and wounded was
108. The Gloucestershire Regiment had particularly heavy losses
among its officers, six being killed and 19 missing.

(0 The Times, 2ndMay 7951


THE ROLL OF HONOUR

The War Office has issued the following list of casualties from
recent operations in Korea:

ROYAL ARMOURED CORPS - Other Ranks - WOUNDED -
Trooper W.N. Johnson.

ROYAL ARTILLERY - Officers - MISSING - Captain C.S.R. Dain,
Captain R.T. Washbrook, Major G.I. Ward, Captain R. Wisby, M.C.

Other Ranks - KILLED - Gunner F.J. Kilbum.

MISSING - W.O.11 G.E. Askew, Sergeant S.E. Aselby, Sergeant D.
Boswell, Gunner D. Boulton, Gunner A. Bruce, Gunner R.L.
Broomer, Gunner L. Bums, Gunner E.G. Bushby, Gunner N.R.
Campbell, Gunner J.A. Cooper, Lance Bombardier T. Clough, Gunner
A.H. Collins, Gunner J. Cameron, Sergeant H.W. Danes, Bombardier
T. Daley, Gunner J.C. Gabbs, Gunner M.E. Dunnachic, Gunner E.E.
Edson, Bombardier G.J. Fitzgerald, Gunner F.G. Gardner, Gunner T.J.
Gibson, Gunner J.W. Hildrew, Gunner J. Harris, Gunner J. Hepple,
Gunner B. Hesford, Gunner M.G. Lorimer, Lance Bombardier R.A.
Lintott, Bombardier E. Marvan, Bombardier G.R. Muncaster, Lance
Bombardier M.A. Mackay, Gunner M. Meneaud, Gunner J. Mason,
Gunner H.B.G. McFarlane, Gunner D. Mackic, Gunner J. Martin,
Gunner D.W. MeDonald, Gunner M. Mair, Lance Bombardier T.L.
Nutting, Bombardier G.F. Oliver, Gunner 1. Ormesher, Gunner M.
O'Neill, Gunner E.G. Pochin,,L@ce Bombardier D.M. Raymont,
Gunner M.B. Rees, Gunner @.A. Roberts, Gunner R.W. Ross, Gunner
A.W. Russell, Gunner E. Stott, Gunner E. Smith, Gunner J.Stocks,
Lance Bombardier B.S. Simms, Gunner J.C. Tracey, Gunner K.R.
Tolley, Gunner F. Usher, Gunner S.J. Vickersons, Sergeant J.G.
Watson, Gunner S.W. Williamson.

WOUNDED - Sergeant J.D. Hales, Gunner 1. Harvey.

ROYAL ENGINEERS - Officers- DIED OF WOUNDS -
Lieutenant B. Swinbanks.

MISSING - Lieutenant K.W. Eastgate.

Other Ranks - KILLED - Sapper V.D. Judd.

WOUNDED - Sapper R.A. Adair, Lance Corporal D. Balls, Sapper 1
Baldwin, Sapper J.G. Charlton, Sapper J. Conroy, Sapper P. Dempsey,
Sapper J. Gamble, Lance Corporal J.F. McLaughlan, Sapper A.
McCormick, Lance Corporal J. O'Kane, Sapper F. Price, Sapper W.R.
Rees, Corporal S.G. Seager, Sapper D.W. Suart.

MISSING - Lance Corporal A.S. Hogg, Sapper J. Hollis, Sapper R.
Harvey, Sapper R.A. Rennie, Sapper C.L. Wylie.

ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
Other Ranks - MISSING - Signalman J.T. Caims, Signalman H.
Jennings, Driver A.E. Miles, Lance Corporal S. Ward.

- 58 -

 ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS
Officm - KILLED - Lieutenant-Colonel K.0.N. Foster, O.B.E.,
2nd Lieutenant G.D. Rudge (Cheshires art 1 R.N.F.).

WOUNDED - Lieutenant J.J. Cubiss, M.C. (W. Yorkshires art 1
R.N.F.), Lieutenant A. MeNamara (R. Leicesters art 1 R.N.F.), Major
C.H. Mitchell, Major R.M. Pratt, D.S.O., Lieutenant S.A.S. Philips,
2nd Lieutenant B.E. Smith, Major H.J. Winn, M.C.

Other Ranks - KILLED - Fusilier S.D. Broadway, Fusilier F. Curry,
Supant C. Clarke, Fusilier B.L. Cox, Fusi tier K. Foster, Sergeant D.
McAnulty, Fusilier C. Sadler, Fusilier D. Tamblyn, Fusilier L. Walker,
Fusilier K. Wintersgill, Fusilier R. Winterton.

WOUNDED - Fusilier J.A. Allport, Fusilier E. Amell, Fusilier J.B.
Barker, Fusilier Broadbent, Corporal C. Bailey, Lance Corporal A.
Burland, Fusilier R. Bedford, Fusilier J. Birkett, Fusilier C.H.
Bwkthorpe, Fusilier R. Burgess, Fusilier F. Brown-King, Corporal 0.
C@ Sergeant W. Clark, Fusilier A. Charlesworth, Fusilier R.
Campbell, Fusilier J. Cumberford, Fusilier R. Crookes, Lance
Corporal S. Chambers, Fusilier J. Davies, Fusilier H. Dobson, Fusilier
W. Dove, Fusilier S. Dobbin, Fusilier R. Evans, Fusilier W. Felton,
Fusilier R. Freeman, Fusilier D. Fairhead, Fusilier W.G. Freakley,
Fusilier A. Feam, Fusilier E. Green, Fusilier S. Giles, Fusilier A.
Gower, Fusilier J.H. Gutteridge, Sergeant W. Gascoyne, Fusilier G.
Hill, Fusilier J. Hughes, Fusilier D. Hinchliffe, Fusilier D. Hambly,
Corporal I. Hadfield, Fusilier L. Jones, Fusilier F.A. Johnson, Fusilier
D. Jobson, Fusilier J. Kay, Fusilier A. Laidlaw, Lance Corporal L.
Lee, Lance Corporal J. Mason, Fusilier H. McNamara, Fusilier T.
McFall, Fusilier J. Mares, Fusilier J. Mussett, Lance Corporal P.
MeDowall, Fusilier R. McLeod, Fusilier C. MeAtamany, Lance
Corporal D. Milne, Lance Corporal R. Mitchell, Fusilier W. Neagle,
Fusilier R. Oakley, Fusilier J. Parry, Fusilier T. Parry, Lance Corporal
R. Pattison, Fusilier J. Pedley, Fusilier F. Pipkin, Fusilier R. Rees,
Fusilier E. Roberts, Fusilier B. Robson, Corporal F. Scott, Fusilier R.
Stewart, Fusilier F. Smith, Fusilier T. Sharp, Fusilier H. Taylor,
Fusilier D. Temple, Fusilier J. Theme, Fusilier R. Williams, Fusilier
L. Woodhall, Fusilier R. Walton, Fusilier J.H. Wade.

IfiSSING - Fusilier D. Briggs, Fusilier J.W. Cooke, Fusilier A.E.
Ellis, Fusilier A. Eke, Fusilier K. Fowler, Fusilier P. Harrison, Fusilier
B.F. Johnson, Fusilier D.J. MeDonald, Lance Corporal S. Russell,
Fusilier L. Spencer, Fusilier K. Slater, Fusilier A.E. Tyas, Fusilier W.
Wwting.

THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT
Officers - KILLED - Major P.A. Angier, Lieutenant P.K.E. Curtis
(D.C.L.I. art Glosters), Captain W.L.D. Morris, 2nd Lieutenant J.M.
Maycock, Captain R.A. St. M. Reeve-Tucker.

NUSSING - Lieutenant D.G. Allman (R. Hampshires att Glosters),
Lieutenant A.F. Blundel (Dorsets art Glosters), Lieutenant-Colonel J.P.
Came, Lieutenant H.C. Cabral, Lieutenant G.T. Costello (R.
Hainpshires art Glosters), 2nd Lieutenant D.J. English (R. Hampshires
art Glosters), Captain A. H. Farrar-Hockley, 2nd Lieutenant E. S. Gael,
Major E.D. Harding, 2nd Lieutenant J.A. Haggerty, Captain G.D.
Lutyens-Humfrey, Captain T.R. Littlewood, 2nd Lieutenant A. Peal,
2nd Lieutenant A.C.N. Preston, Captain H.J. Pike, Lieutenant G.F.B.
Teinple, 2nd Lieutenant T.E. Waters (W. Yorkshires art Glosters),
Captain AM. Wilson, Major P.W. Welter.

Odier Ranks - KILLED - Corporal L.J. Bishop, Corporal G.B.
Burchill, Lance Corporal D.A. Balls, Private R.T. Ballard, Private R.J.
Burton, Private D. Fox, Private W.A. Fox, Private J. Jones, Private
H.E. Judge, Corporal P.J. Maycock, Private J. Morley, Corporal R.G.
Norley, Lance Corporal D.M. Taylor.

WOUNDED - Private H.G. Anderson, Private D.R. Blackmore
(Devons art Glosters), Private G.F. Bullock (Wiltshires art Glosters),
Private R.E. Collett, Private H.W. Chalk, Private E.C. Clifford,

 Private E.T. Collier, Private P.W. Drewitt, Private A. Davies, Private
H.E. Elkins, Private G.A. Egan, Private M.G. Guilford (Wiltshires art
Glosters), Private G.D. Gordge (Wiltshires art Closters), Private E.F.
Hobbs, Private J.L. Harris (Wiltshires art Glosters), Private D.R.
Hamson (Wiltshires art Glosters), Corporal L.A. Kemp, Private E.
Longley, Private D.E. Lynch, Lance Corporal W.W. Lealand, Private
A.F. Larnbert, Private L. Reynolds, Private B.N. Robins (Devons art
Glosters), Private S.W. Stone, Private N.G. Sinnott (Devons art
Glosters), Private W.J. Slocombe (Wiltshires art Glosters), Lance
Corporal L.F. Swatton, Private J.R. Shiers, Private A.H. Taylor,
Private H. Uttley, Private J. Vosper (Wiltshires art Glosters),
Private H. White, Corporal L.E. Waterbridge.

MISSING - W.O.11 N.V. Baker, Lance Corporal R. Bennett, C.Q.M.S.
P.E. Buss, C.Q.M.S. H.E. Buxcey, Private S.J. Famell, W.O.11 H.
Gallagher, Private B.G. Gallop, W.O.1 W.J. llobbs, Corporal C.A.
Jolly, Private J. Laing, W.O.11 A.E. Morton, Sergeant H.J. Pegier,
Corporal A.J. Powell, C.Q.M.S. R. Panting, Colour Sergeant J,
Ridlington, Sergeant D.W. Sallabank (Devons art Glosters).

THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT
Officers - WOUNDED - 2nd Lieutenant R. Brown,
2nd Lieutenant E.W. Martin.

Other Ranks - KILLED - Corporal T. Amos, Private W.A. Heath (S.
Staffords art Middlesex), Lance Corporal G. Innes (Glosters art
Middlesex), Private J. Oates (K.S.L.I. art Middlesex), Lance Corporal
Stanford.

WOUNDED - Private P. Bailey S. (Staffords art Middlesex), Private
T. Carrol, Private L. Church (S. Staffords art Middlesex), Private R.
Clarke, Private D. Everett, Private B. Fradley (S. Stallords art
Middlesex), Private W. Gayner, Corporal R. Hanner, Private R. Hilton
(K.S.L.I. art Middlesex), Private R. Jenner, Private J. Lofts, Private C.
Myatt (Glosters art Middlesex), Lance Corporal T. Moore (Queens art
Middlesex), Private R. Mathieson, Private New, Sergeant J. Perkins,
Private R. Russell, Private E. Sabin, Corporal K. Sutton.

ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES
Officers - WOUNDED - 2nd Lieutenant P.J.G. Kavanagh
(Inniskillings art k.-b.R.), Major Sir C.J. Nixon, Bt., M.C.

MISSING - Captain T.G. Docker, Lieutenant V.A. Dunlop (Kings art
R.U.R.), Lieutenant H.J. Marsh (S. Lancashires att R.U.R.),
Lieutenant J.M.C. Nicolls, Major J.K.H. Shaw, D.S.O., M.C., 2nd
Lieutenant VP.C. Whitamore (Loyals, art R.U.R.).

Other Ranks - KILLED - Corporal J. Lewis, Rifleman T. McGiven,
Lance Corporal J. Smith, Rifleman R. Washer.

WOUNDED - Rifleman 1. Byrne, Ritleman S. Brown, Lance Corporal
E. Brown (Gloucesters all R.U.R.), Rifleman R. Carr, Rifleman V
Dean, Rifleman P. Day, Private J. Done (Gloucesters art R.U.R.),
Private L.C. Edwards (Gloucesters art R.U.R.), Rifleman W.J.
Fletcher, Rifleman E.G. Gibson, Lance Corporal P. Hennessy,
Rifleman I.J. Hannon, Rifleman S.J. Law, Rifleman W. MeBumey,
Rifleman H. McKenna, Rifieirnan R.F. McLoughlin, Rifleman G.
McKinley, Lance Corporal W.O'Connor, Corporal E.J. O'Neil,
Rifleman T. Riley, Rifleman A.C. Ryan, Rifleman L. Smith, Sergeant
J. Stewart, Rifleman J.F. Shute, Rifleman G. Walsh, Rifleman W.
Whiteside.

MISSING - Private R.B. Cook (Gloucesters art R.U.R.), Rifleman L.
Clark, Rifleman F. Fitzgeraid, Rifleman H.A. McNaughton, Rifleman
B. Stoner, Pte H. Tucker, Rifleman W. Tumilson.

ROYAL ARMY SERVICE CORPS
Other Ranks - WOUNDED - Lance Corporal A. Churchley,
Driver W.A. Carter.

- 59 -

 MISSING - Lance Corporal J.R. Hyland, Driver P.H. Surtees,
Driver J. Thompson.

ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS
Officers - WOUNDED - Captain T. Dungavel.

MISSING - Captain R.P. Hickey

Other Ranks - WOUNDED - Private M. Elliott.

MISSING - Private K.C. Armstrong, Private F. Broome, Corporal
H.E. Calder, Private E.J. Janman, Private W.C. Webster.

ARMY CATERING CORPS
Other ranks - MISSING - Private A. Moseley.

(0 The Times, 2nd May 1951



THE ROLL OF HONOUR

The War Office has issued the following further list of casualties in
recent operations in Korea:

8TH HUSSARS - Officers - WOUNDED - Captain G.S. Murray (5th
Dragoon Guards art 8th Hussars), Captain P.C. Ormrod,
2nd Lieutenant J.B. Venner (7th Hussars art 8th Hussars).

ROYAL ARTILLERY - Officers - WOUNDED -
Major W.H. Pearce.

THE ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS - Officers -
KILLED - Lieutenant F.B. Millington (R. Leicesters art R.N.F.).

MISSING - Lieutenant S.W. Cooper (R. Leicesters art R.N.F.),
Captain J.E.M. de Quidt (Warwicks art R.N.F.),
Lieutenant A.R.D. Perrins.

Other Ranks - MISSING - Fusilier C.R. Ableot, Fusilier T. Angus,
Fusilier J. Aitken, Sergeant A.F. Baggott, Fusilier S.G. Bartell,
Fusilier L. Bastable, Fusilier D. Barton, Fusilier T.E. Bloore, Fusilier
B. Baird, Fusilier M. Catchpole, Fusilier W.J. Cochlin, Fusilier S.
Chambers, Fusilier R. Cook, Sergeant R.A. Donald, Fusilier C.
Elcock, Corporal P.J. Forsdick, Fusilier R.G. Ford, Lance Corporal J.
Gorbom, Fusilier W. Haynes, Fusilier S.C. Jackson, Fusilier J.J.
Johnson, Lance Corporal J. Kain, Fusilier D.G. Kinne, Fusilier D.
Langley, Fusilier K.G. Murray, Fusilier J. Maguire, Fusilier S.A.P.
Mitchell, Fusilier Z. Needham, Corporal F. Peach, Fusilier G.H.
Stones, Fusilier J. Surley, Sergeant B. Sharp, Lance Corporal G.A.
Thomton, Fusilier S. Taylor, Fusilier R. Whitley, Fusilier 1. Walne,
Fusilier W.C. Wellman, Fusilier F. Watts.

THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - Other Ranks -
KILLED - Private R. Vosper.

MISSING - Private A. Alexander, Private R.B. Allum, Private A.J.
Allum, Pte W.T. Baston, Private A.A. Brett, Private C.A. Baker,
Private G. Birch, Private L.C. Baker, Private R.A. Bennett, Private
M.E. Bounden, Lance Corporal E.J. Birt, Private J. Bowley, Sergeant
S.J. Brisland, Corporal E. Basham, Pte G. Chambers, Private G.
Chapman, Private A.U. Chawner, Private N.F. Chitty, Private W.J.
Cox, Private R.E. Cox, Private A.D. Carter, Private R.E. Crews,
Lance Corporal A.T. Cuthbert, Private J. Cam, Private G. Clarke,
Private K.H. Collins, Private W.C. Carter; Private G. Cooke
(Wiltshires art Glosters), Sergeant 1.H.J. Dee, Private W. Donaldson,
Private R.L.J. Davis, Private E. Day, Private F.R. Devine, Corporal
A.J. Donaghue, Private C. Dando, Private H. Deaney, Corporal D.A.
Daw, Private J. Edmonds, Private A.R. Evans, Private B. Eales,
Private A.P. Eagles, Private A.H. Fulgoni, Private G.H.R. Furr, Private
D.G. Fluck, Private R.C. Flynn, Private R. Gardiner, Private T.W.

 Gardner, Private M. Godden, Private J.W.H. Grosvenor, Private W.G.
Gunn, Lance Corporal E. Green, Lance Corporal G.W. Garvey, Lance
Corporal G. Goldsmith, Lance Corporal D.G.A. Gray, Lance Corporal
F.A. Grinstead, Private R. Gardner, Lance Corporal A. Gault, Private
R.A. Gilding, Private L.E. Gisbome, Private C.G. Gray, Private W.
Harding, Private L. Henson, Private B.H. Hill, Private F. Hilton,
Corporal A. Holdham, Private E.A. Hart, Lance Corporal R.S.F.
Haskell, Private 1. Hawker, Private S.A. Heartnon, Private G. Hibbitt,
Private F. Hilton. Private P. Hone, Private R. Horsfall, Private D.G.
Kaye, Private R.F. Knowles, Private R.J. Jordan, Private D. Jones,
Corporal D. Jenner, Private J.W. Jones, Private J.T. Jefferies, Private
J. Keefe, Private D.W. King, Private E.W. Lucas, Private S. Lea,
Sergeant W. Lueas, Private G.L.S. Lee, Private M. Leach, Private J.A.
Lord, Private P.W. Lucas, Private J.S. Luckett, Private D. Morris,
Private H. Maynard, Lance Corporal D.D. Mew, Lance Corporal VG.
Mills, Private P.C. Marchant, Private E.C. Madgwick, Private H.
Mclntyre, Private A. Meredith, Pte A. Minns, Private P. Moore,
Private R.T. Othen, Private B. Pounds, Corporal W.D. Possee, Private
E.W. Partridge, Private W.A. Patrick, Private P. Patterson, Private
Pearce, Private E.E. Pearson, Private M. Pendle, Private H. Perkins,
Private R.G. Pettitt, Private T.A. Pink, Private S.G. Povey, Private H.
Powell, Private F.J. Price, Private D.W. Payne, Private G.A. Roberts,
Private D.A. Reynolds, PrivateW. Ramsell, Private C.V Rayner,
Private J.T. Read, Private R. Reeves, Private T. Remnant, Private
R.W. Reilly, Private 0. Smith, Private A.E. Spilsbury, Private F.P.
Steer, Lance Corporal H. Sharpling, Corporal W.H. Smith, Sergeant
W. Smythe, Private D.A. Savery, Private M.R. Sawyer, Private C.D.
Semmens, Private W.A. Seymour, Private J.D. Skoines, Private D.
Tomlinson, Private J. Tyler, Private A. Trude, Corporal S.H. Truan,
Lance Corporal S.A. West, Corporal K. Walters, Corporal WK.
Westwood.

THE ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - Officer - WOUNDED -
Captain H.D. Miller.

Other Ranks - KILLED - Rifleman J. Doran (see note at end of
casualty list), ffifieman J.P. McCartam.

WOUNDED - Sergeant T.J. Buckley, Rifleman P.T. Berry, Rifleman
G.F. Colbom, Rifleman F.J. Charters, Rifleman J. Greer, Rifleman J.D,
Henderson, Rifleman J. Hooke, Lance Corporal S. Karsley, Rifleman
W. McColl, Rifleman J. Mclntyre, Lance Corporal R.F. Massey,
Rifleman F. MeDonald, Rifleman F. Neehan, Rifleman E.I.A. Pole.

MISSING - Rifleman JR. Anderson, Rifleman A. Altimas, Rifleman
L. Burrow, Rifleman C.S. Brierley, Rifleman H. Burton, Corporal J.
Baxter, Rifleman H.M. Bannon, Rifleman R. Boyd, Rifleman T.
Brannan, Rifleman S. Cordners, Rifleman H.J. Cordery, Rifleman
W.H. Cunningham, Rifleman P.J. Coyne, Rifleman D. Crawford,
Rifleman J. Coupe, Rifleman J. Conner, Corporal V.K. Clayton,
Rifleman J. Dowie, Rifleman P. Dunn, Rifleman N. Dooley, Rifleman
J.A. Edwards, Rifleman C.H. Farrow, Rifleman J. Gamble, Rifleman
C. Gouldsborough, Rifleman W.A. Gibson, Sergeant D. Gaw,
Rifleman T.H. Horion, Rifleman A. Hinchcliffe, Rifleman V.P. Hurren,
Rifleman J. Hasett, Rifleman G.L. Hobson, Lance Corporal S.J.
Hardacre, Rifleman J. Hull, Sergeant J.R. Hunter, Rifleman W. Julian,
Rifleman L. Jones, Rifleman H. Jones, Rifleman E. Kewin, Rifleman
J. Kay, Rifleman J. Kay, Corporal W. Lorimer, Rifleman H. Liddle,
Sergeant F. Lennon, Rifleman F. McMillan, Rifleman R.J.A.
MacDonald, Rifleman S.B. Mullan, Rifleman L. McKinney, Rifleman
J.B. Mellor, Rifleman A.F. Mooney, Rifleman A.W. Mallett, Rifleman
T.J. McConnell, Rifleman P. Maher, Rifleman W.B. Mercer, Rifleman
T. McCann, Lance Corporal C. McLauglin, Rifleman R. Martin,
Rifleman S. Montgomery, Rifleman D. Maher, Rifleman R.J.
Mulligan, Rifleman J. MeGuigan, Rifleman H. McCracken, Rifleman
P. Montgqmery, Rifleman E.R. McAlonen, Rifleman R. Norman,
Rifleman P. Neeson, Rifleman H. O'Kane, Rifleman J. Orr, Rifleman
S. Oakley, Rifleman T.A. O'Connor, Rifleman W.R. Pritt, Rifleman R.
Prior, Rifleman J. Porter, Rifleman S. Parkinson, Rifleman J.
Robshaw, Rifleman G. Riding, Rifleman E. Ross, Rifleman M. Reidy,
ffifieman G. Ritchie, Rifleman W. Shields, Rifleman W. Stroner,

- 60 -

 Rifleman IJ. Speirs, Rifleman A. Shaw, Rifleman L. Short, Rifleman
W.H. Thompson, Rifleman J. Tweedie, Rifleman E.J. Valler, Rifleman
M.0. Ward, Rifleman E.F. Woods, Rifleman J. Welch, Rifleman W.J.
Young.

ROYAL ARMY CHAPLAINS DEPARTMENT - Officers -
MISSING - Chaplain to the Forces, 4th Class S.J. Davies (art
Glosters).

ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS - Officers - MISSING -
Captain D.R. Patchett.

Other Ranks - MISSING - Corporal F. Geary, Corporal D. Hansford.

ROYAL ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERS -
Other Ranks - MISSING - Lance Corporal R.F. Mathews.

ARW PHYSICAL TRAINING CORPS - Other Ranks -
MISSING - WO. 11 S.G. Strong.

ARW CATERING CORPS - Other Ranks - MISSING - Private M.
Byrne, Private J. Campbell, Corporal A.W. Flegg, Private R. Foster,
Sergeant PD. Hawkes, Private F.H. Stevens, Private A.H.J. Venning,
Corporal I.M. Watkins, Private J.A. Watson.

(0 The Times, 3rd May 1951

Note re: Rifleman J Doran. His name did not appear in the MOD
list of those who diedfrom any means during the Korean War Nor did
his name appear in WO 32116046 Cause ofdeath Listing at the
Public Record Office, Kew. Subsequent research revealed that the
regimental number shown against big name in the casualty report
raised by his battalion in May 1951, and included in WO 28111165,
the RUR War Diaryfor May 1951 at the Public Record Office, Kew,
belonged to Rifleman J Walshe whose name does appear in the
MOD @ list. We subsequently learned that 22523389 Rifleman J
Doran and 22523389 Rifleman J Walshe were one and the same per-
son. Rifleman Doran has been listed under his real name - Walshe.
- Patrick Lohan



THE ROLL OF HONOUR

The War Office has issued the following further list of casualties in
recent operations in Korea:

ROYAL ARMOURED CORPS - Other Ranks - WOUNDED -
Trooper R. Cliffe, Corporal V. MeNamara, Trooper D.S. Poulton,
Sergeant E Rowan.

MISSING -Trooper J.B. Baugh, Trooper K.M. Bielby, Trooper P.
Coate, Trooper J.W. Dunn, Corporal J.W. Holberton, Lance Corporal
J.W.L. King, Trooper E. O'Donnell, Sergeant DR. Reekie, Trooper
A.R. Smith, Trooper S.F. Sears, Corporal E. Stone, Trooper M.L.
Walton.

ROYAL ARTILLERY - Officers - KILLED - Lieutenant A.B.S.
Hudson, Captain A.M.L. Newcombe. (Captain A.M.L. Newcombe
was repatriated as a POW after the ceasefire).

Other Ranks - KILLED - Gunner J.W. Camp, Gunner W. Hewitt.

DIED OF WOUNDS - Gunner R. Cruikshanks.

WOUNDED - Gunner J. Fairhurst, Gunner D. Griffith, Gunner DR.
Shaw, Bombardier J.C. West.

MISSING - Gunner R.E. Button, Lance Bombardier G.M. Clarke,
Gunner J. Micklethwaite.

 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS - Other Ranks - WOUNDED -
Driver L. Newman.
MISSING - Driver E. Greenman.

THE ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS - Other Ranks -
MISSING - Fusilier W. Ellis, Fusilier R. Sugden.

THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - Other Ranks -
WOUNDED - Sergeant J. Hall.

MISSING - Private A. Adicm, Lance Corporal W. Aylward, Private R.
Austin, Private A. Anderson, Private L. Alldrett, Private L. Allen,
Private H. Askey, Corporal C. Bailey, Corporal J. Bateman Corporal
E. Broughton, Lance Corporal T. Benneyworth, Lance Corporal C.S.
Bidwell, Private D.C. Bailey, Private R. Beddis, Private T.R.
Bingham, Private R.A. Boorman, Private F.W.D. Bostock, Private J.
Brooks, Private J.J. Brown, Private T.Barry, Corporal P.J. Bear,
Private N. Batts, Private V. Benford, Private D. Binding, Private M.
Bissell, Private G. Bloomfield, Private D. Bool, Private S. Bradley,
Private M. Bradshaw, Private A. Bradshaw, Private W. Brazenall,
Private H. Bramley, Private DR. Butcher, Private A. Colbum,
Sergeant T. Clayden, Corporal L. Charman, Private A.Carter, Private
M.T. Cawsey, Private J. Chambers, Private P.J. Clark, Private F.
Clutterbuck, Private W. Cooper, Private E.E.A. Comey, Private A.
Crosby, Private R. Cham, Private J. Clarkson, Private R. Clayson,
Private R.W.A. Coltman, Private W. Cook, Private M. Coombes,
Private D. Coram, Private J. Cox, Private A.J. Cusson, Private E.
Davies, Private L. Davis, Private G. Dawson, Private P. Dearden,
Private H. Digweed, Private J. Dixon, Private A. Dowse, Private F.
Dudley, Private F. Davies, Private T. Davies, Private B. Dimmelow,
Private C. Durack, Private R.J. Dowding, Private R. English, Sergeant
K. Eames, Private W. Ennis, Private S.E. Edwards, Private T.
Finnerty, Private S, Foster, Private S. Furminger, Private R. Foster,
Corporal W. Greenaway, Private W. Coddard, Private H. Graham,
Private R. Green, Corporal J. Green, Private P. Godden', Private W.
Gray, Private D.J. Green, Private K. Gudge, Private K. Godwin,
Corporal D. Griffin, M.M., Lance Corporal J.A. Hartigan, Sergeant i.
Hale, Sergeant B. Hill, Sergeant P.J. Hoper, Corporal A. Hatwell,
Corporal R. Hirst, Private B. Hamblett, Private H. Hawkins, Private
R. Headland, Private E.J. Hammond, Private E. Harris, Private A.
Hawkins, Private D. Hollebone, Private G. Hunter, Private S. Hall,
Private A. Hardy, Sergeant E. Jerkins, Lance Corporal H. Johnston,
Private M. James, Private E. Jinks, Private W. Johnson, Private L.
Jones, Private P. Jones, Private L. Judkins, Corporal D. Jarinain,
Private D. Kendall, Private W. King, Private W. Kear, Private R.
Knight, Corporal V. Lawson, Corporal R. Lee, Lance Corporal J.W.
Lee, Private R. Loader, Sergeant B. Murphy, Corporal L.A. Manley,
Private D.E. Mansfield, Private H. Mason, Private W. McKay, Private
E.C. Morriss, Private F. Murton, Private L. Mallery, Private D.Marks,
Private A. Marsh, Sergeant D. Northey, Lance Corporal K. Newby,
Private E. Nash, Private R. Nash, Private J. Neath, Private T. Nugent,
Private K.C.M. Prince, Private A.D. Preece, Private H. Perkins,
Private A.H. Parfitt, Private M. Penrose, Private F. Perryman, Private
J. Poulton, Lance Corporal E. Rogers, Lance Corporal J.W. Riches,
Private F. Ross, Private E. Ratcliffe, Private W. Reynolds, Private R.
Rich, Private D. Richards, Private G. Roberts, Private E. Rose, Lance
Corporal W.G. Swancott, Private A. Sykes, Private W. Street, Private
A. Savage, Private J. Sheldrake, Private G. Sephens (Private G.W.
Stephens released in Big Switch), Private R. Searle, Private R.
Sheldon, Private S. Smith, Private U. Smith, Private D. Stockting,
Corporal B. Smith, Private F. Simpson, Private C.M. Smith, Private 1.
Stanbury, Private F.W. Stapleton, Private C. Stoneman, Private P.
Tozer, Private G. Tucker, Private G. Tull, Private H. Tew, Private A.
Thorling, Private A. Tremlett, Private W. Turner, Corporal F. Upjohn,
Private H. Underdown, Corporal J.0. Vaughan, Private E. Viney,
Private J. Varney, Corporal G. Warren, Lance Corporal H. Walker,
Lance Corporal W. Wright, Private F.S. Woodrow, Private B.
Whitchurch, Private A. Whitehead, Private P.G. Winter, Private P.
Wade, Private D. Walker, Private A. Ward, Private F. Wells, Private N.
Ward, Private B.L. Wagg, Private A.R. Waycott, Private H. Wheller,
Private C.R. Williams, Private G.L. White, Private J. Wilson, Private
R. Young.

- 61 -

 THE ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - Other Ranks - MISSING -
Rifleman N. Anderson, Rifleman D. Brown, M.M., Rifleman K.
Fletcher, Rifleman A. Magill, Rifleman W.H. Robinson.

ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS - Other Ranks - MISSING -
Sergeant S.F. Baxter, Corporal E.T. Bruton, Corporal H. Manning,
Corporal E. Marshall, Corporal C. Papworth.

Amendments to earlier lists - Lance Corporal W.W. Lealand,
Glosters, previously reported 'wounded' is missing.
Rifleman J.R. Anderson, R.U.R. and Rifleman L. McKinney, R.U.R.,
previously reported 'missing' in error.

(0 The Times, 4th May 1951


THE ROLL OF HONOUR

The War Office has issued the following further list of casualties in
recent operations in Korea:

THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - Other Ranks -
WOLJNDED - Private J.E. Crabbe, Private G.A. Freeman,
Private C. Pack.

MISSING - Private R. Allman, Private S. Adams, Private SA. Allum,
Private W.C. Armstrong, Corporal G. Baker, Corporal W. Bilboe,
Lance Corporal J.W. Baldwin, Private F.A. Bourel, Private H.J.
Brown, Private F. Barclay, Private S. Barlett, Private L.Bennion,
Private V. Bowl, Private S. Bow, Private F.D. Bailey, Private D.N.
Barber, Private A.J. Bigglestone, Private F. Brazier, Private C.A.
Brooks, Private R.A. Budden, Sergeant I. Claxton, Sergeant S.W.
Cottam, Corporal E.H. Childs, Lance Corporal J. Crisp, Private D.T.
Cla,rk, Private W. Clark, Private F. Cannon, Private F. Carter, Private
A. Clarke, Private J. Collins, Private D. Comish, Private H. Cox,
Private J. Cragg, Private M.P. Chilcott, Private W.C. Carkett, Lance
Corporal C. Dyer, Private F. Dowds, Private G.J. Dailey, Private F.W.
Daws, Private H. Dawson, Private R. Desforges, Private C. Dillon,
Private R. Dymond, Private S.W. Davis, Private H. Durham, Private
W. Dix, Corporal G. Elliot, Private L. Essex, Private J. Everitt, Private
C.H. Edkins, Private A.P. Ellard, Private L. Ellerby, Private P.J.
Etherington, Private W. Fenner, Private H. Fowler, Private J. Fowler,
Private D. Fritchley, Private R.H. Fish, Private K.F. Fisher, Private
C.D. Francis, Private A.W. Grant, Private J. Gazzard, Private R. Gray,
Private H. Green, Private J. Green, Private R. Grimes, Private N.A.
Gadd, Private D.A. Gardiner, Private A. Gee, Private J. Godbold,
Private A.C. Grist, Lance Corporal H. Hawkesworth, Private A.E.
HAte, Private M. Holmes, Private S.D. Bill, Private R.C. Hall,
Private C. Hall, Private R. Halpin, Private E. Hartland, Private D.
Hole, Private R.W. Hughes, Private R. Hukins, Private G. Harris,
Private E.E. Harrison, Private D. Haines, Private B. Jackson, Private
P. Jennery, Private J. Johnson, Private J.K. Joyce, Private T. Knight,
Private R.A. Lee, Private D. Large, Private A. Lambert, Private D.
Lendrum, Private D. Lueas, Corporal R.Y. Masters, Lance Corporal
J.C. Mahon, Private S.G. Maxim, Private J.S. MeLean, Private S.A.
Mercer, Private R.L. Middleton, Private R.W. Mills, Private N.J.
Mounter, Private N. Murphy, Private P. Maskell, Private R.
Matthews, Private D. Maxwell, Private T. Meads, Private A. Mitchell,
Private J. Moyes, Lance Corporal T. Newark, Private F.A. Nash,
Private G. Newhouse, Private C.W. Nicholls, Lance Corporal W. Orr,
Private W. Osbome, Sergeant P. Pethrick, Sergeant P.J. Pugh, Lance
Corporal E.O. Pressley, Private R.J. Pearson, Private L.C. Payne,
Private G.R. Price, Private L.H. Perks, Private D. Palmer, Private W.
Palfrey, Private H.G. Pemberton, Private B. Phillips, Private V
Pilditch, Private J. Potter, Private J. Pye, Corporal S. Robinson,
Corporal T.J. Roots, Private D. Reardon, Private F.L. Richards,
Private E.R. Rose, Private R.A. Rogers, Private L. Roberts, Private W.
Roberts, Private J. Robson, Corporal J. Short, Lance Corporal S.
Seymour, Private M. Smith, Private F. Smith, Private W.R. Smith,

 Private K.J. Smith, Private S. Sainsbury, Private A.J. Sheppard,
Private R.F. Stone, Private H.J. Swetton, Private F. Sheiton, Private T.
Shetcliffe, Private C. Sinclair, Private R. Sladen, Private W. Synnott,
Sergeant M.H. Tuggey, Lance Corporal Taylor, Corporal G. Thomas,
Private A.R. Taylor, Private R.C. Taylor, Private M.J. Thomas, Private,
P. Thomas, Private R.M. Thomas, Private L. Tyrrell, Private A.E.
Tideswell, Private D. Tudor, Private R. Turley, Corporal R.
Wellington, Private J. Ward, Private R.M. Warrior, Private T. Watson,
Private A. Wicks, Private J.H. Williams, Private R.A. Wino., Private
C.C. Warren, Private W.A. Widshe, Private O.G. Williams, Private D,
Winter, Private G. Wood, Private R, Yates.

Amendment to earlier casualty list - Fusilier W. Haynes, R.N.F.
Previously reported missing, now located (wounded) in field
hospital.

(C The Time,@, 5th May 1951


GENERAL MacARTHUR'S EXAMINATION ENDS

General MacArthur, on the third and last day of his appearance
before the Senate Armed Services and Foreign Relations committees,
repudiated the strategic ideas both of ex-President Hoover and
Senator Taft, but repeated his belief that intensification of the war
against China would lead to early and complete victory.
The New York Times, having discussed his programme and the
assumption on which it rests, decided that "the hazards of such pro-
posals become evident from the mere recital of them ... we cannot
afford to risk a break with our allies by pursuing a course of action
which might well bog us down in an unlimited war in Asia."
The New York Herald Tribune says that "the MacArthur,. thesis is
challenged on its face by innumerable lessons of military and political
history in Asia and elsewhere; since, if it is not sound, the costs of
acting upon it would be catastrophic. The testing must now be press
with the maximum thoroughness allowable under the limitations of
security."
Referring to his advice that "if our western allies would not follow
us ill Asia he would go in alone," it says "that rather startling
revelation of General MacArthur's basic attitude and outlook makes
it of critical importance that the recommendations founded upon it
should be, however sincerely advanced, very carefully and critically
examined. It was an attitude and outlook which, his present
protestations to the contrary, led MacArthur straight into the trap
the Chinese Communists prepared for him last winter. The possibility
that it would lead us into a vastly larger and more tragic trap again
cannot be dismissed without the most thorough test of the present
MacArthur thesis."

C The Times, 7th May 1951


A U.N. ADVANCE IN KOREA

From Our Own Correspondent, New York, May 8 - United Nations
forces, with South Korean troops in the vanguard, advanced to-day
on the west Korean front to a point on the east bank of the Han river
17 miles north-west of Seoul, and armoured patrols diverging from
Uijongbu advanced as far as 20 miles north of the city. At the extreng
western end of the line United Nations forces on the Kimpo peninsul
exchanged mortar fire with enemy troops.

(0 The Times, 9th May 1951

- 62 -

 K.S.L.I. EMBARK FOR KOREA

From Our Own Correspondent, Hongkong, May 8 - The King's
Shropshire Light Infantry embarked for Korea to-day on board the
US.& Montrose. Lieutenant-General Sir Robert Mansergh addressed
the troops and remarked they would be the only light infantry
battalion among the British contingent in Korea.

(0 The Times, 9th May 1951


HEROISM OF THE GLOUCESTERS

HIGHEST U.S. AWARD

In Korea, May 8 - The few survivors of the 1 st Battalion, The
Gloucestershire Regiment, and the 170th Independent Mortar Battery,
paraded today to receive from Lieutenant-General Van Fleet, the
Eighth Army commander, the blue ribbon of the Presidential Unit
Citation for heroism in action, the highest American decoration
awarded to units.
In the words of the official citation, the Gloucesters and mortar
personnel were honoured for their epic stand when the 29th Brigade
took the main shock of the Communist offensive from April 22 to 25.
Between 40 and 50 men of the battalion got back, leaving 600 killed
and missing on the field. If the King approves, every man serving
with these units will be able to wear the ribbon, and a blue streamer
will be added to the unit's battle honours.
Behind a dais facing the three-sided parade were the Union Jack, the
brigade colours, the flags of Belgium and Luxembourg, and the
colours of the Belgian battalion which is part of the 29th Brigade.
American Military Police held the Stars and Stripes and the standard
of Lieutenant-General Van Fleet. A guard of honour was mounted by
the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers. Pipers of the Royal Ulster Rifles
played as Brigadier Brodic, the brigade commander, reported to the
army commander.

THE GENERAUS TRIBUTE
General Van Fleet said: "I have come to be in good company, and to
pay tribute to the wonderful British Commonwealth forces. 1 wanted
to get better acquainted with and pay tribute and give honour to
your gallant stand. 1 know 1 am in great company. 1 am proud and
honoured to be here." The General said they had stopped the
communist advance and he felt deeply the losses they had suffered.
They had acted in keeping with the finest traditions of the British
forces.
Lieutenant-Colonel Digby Grist, the Gloucesters'new commanding
officer, received the award for the battalion, and Major T. Fisher-Hoch
received it on behalf of the 170th Independent Mortar Battery.
The 29th Brigade commander also received a message from
Lieutenant-General Milbum, commander of the 1 Corps, in which he
said: "I want to commend you and your officers and men for gallantry
in action while defending the lmjin River line during the last days
of April against the assault of greatly superior forces. Subject to
exceedingly heavy pressure, you did not falter, and met his attacks
with fighting will and courage beyond his belief as is attested by the
hundreds of enemy dead in close proximity to your actions." The
Communists would remember the 29th Brigade as a formidable
opponent. "We are all proud of you. American G.I.s right across the
Korean front are giving unstinted praise to the 29th and 27th
Brigades."
The French battalion is the only other non-American unit in Korea
to have been awarded the Presidential citation. - (0 Reuters

The Times, 9th May 1951

 THE INDOMITABLE GLOUCESTERS

Eighth Army Headquarters, Korea, May 11 Lieutenant-General
Van Fleet, the Eighth Army commander, having called for reports on
the part played by the officers and men of The Gloucestershire
Regiment and the 170th Independent Mortar Battery in the recent
Communist offensive, and having reviewed all the information, today
issued the following special communique.

The Ist Battalion and C Troop (of the Independent Mortar Battery)
were defending a very critical sector of the battlefield during a
determined attack by the enemy. The defending units were over-
whelmingly outnumbered. The 623rd Chinese Communist Army
drove the full force of its savage assault at the positions held by the
1 st Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment, and attached unit. The
route of supply ran south-east from the battalion between two hills.
The hills dominated the surrounding terrain northwest to the lmjin
river. Enemy pressure was built up on the battalion front during the
day, April 23.
On April 24 the weight of the attack had driven the right flank of
the battalion back. The pressure grew heavier and heavier, and the
battalion and attached unit were forced into a perimeter defence
on Hill 235. During the night heavy enemy forces had by-passed the
staunch defenders and closed all avenues of escape.
The courageous soldiers of the battalion and attached unit were
holding the critical route selected by the enemy for one column of the
general offensive designed to encircle and destroy the 1 Corps. These
gallant soldiers would not retreat. As they were compressed tighter
and tighter in their perimeter defence they called for close in air
strikes to assist in holding firm. Completely surrounded by tremen-
dous numbers, these indomitable resolute and tenacious soldiers
fought back with unsurpassed fortitude and courage.
As ammunition ran low and the advancing hordes moved closer and
closer, these splendid soldiers fought back viciously to prevent the
enemy from oven-unning the position and moving rapidly to the south.
The heroic stand provided the critically needed time to regroup other 1
Corps units and block the southern advance of the enemy. Time and
again efforts were made to reach the battalion, but the enemy strength
blocked each efrort. Without thought of defeat or surrender, this
heroic force demonstrated superb battlefield courage and discipline.
Every yard of ground they surrendered was covered with enemy dead,
until the last gallant soldier of the fighting battalion was overpowered
by the final surge of the enemy masses.
The 1 st Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment, and Troop C,
170th Independent Mortar Battery, displayed such gallantry, determi-
nation, and esprit de corps in accomplishing their mission under
extremely difficult and hazardous conditions as to set them apart and
above other units participating in the same battle. Their sustained
brilliance in battle, their resoluteness and extraordinary heroism are in
keeping with the finest traditions of the renowned military forces of
the British Commonwealth, and reflect unsurpassed credit on these
courageous soldiers and their homeland. - (0 Reuters

The Times, 12th May 1951


CASIJALTIES IN KOREA

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

ROYAL ARTILLERY - Other Ranks - WOUNDED -
Gunner A. Capstick.

THE ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS - Other Ranks -
KILLED - Lance Corporal H. Hamer.

WOUNDED - Sergeant F.P. Waters, Lance Corporal W. Bainbridge,
Lance Corporal J.T. Hayes, Fusilier B. Hirst, Fusilier J. Hamill.

- 63 -

 THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - Other Ranks -
DIED OF WOUNDS - Private B.N. Robins, Devons art Glosters;
Private H. Uttley (previously reported wounded).

MISSING - Sergeant J. Leathem, Sergeant P.C. Crompton, Corporal
A.H. Perkins, Private H.M. Mairs, Private R.L. White, Private J.W.
Wood, Private R.H. Wheatley, Private J.E. Wiseman.

Amendments to earlier lists: Previously reported missing - now
located (wounded) - Private A.D. Carter.

THE MIDDLESEX REGIMENT - Other Ranks - WOUNDED -
Private E. Sampson.

THE ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - Other Ranks - MISSING -
Rifleman J.R. Anderson, Rifleman C.D. Clark, Rifleman H. Howarth,
Rifleman S. Stewart.

Amendments to earlier lists: Previously reported missing - now
located - Rifleman J.A. Edwards, Rifleman W. Julian, Rifleman T.J.
McConnell, Rifleman J. Welch.

Previously reported missing - now located (wounded) - Rifleman E.
Kewin, Rifleman R. Nonnan, Rifleman E.J. Vallen

C The Times, ]2th May 1951


RELIEF FOR CARRIERS IN KOREAN WATERS

The Admiralty stated yesterday that it had been found desirable to
give ships' companies and aircrews of carriers a period of rest after
six months' service in Korean waters.
"if the war in Korea continues," said the statement, "H.MS. Glory
will thus require some relief in October, and to effect this, while
avoiding even a temporary reduction in the British Commonwealth
contribution to the United Nations Forces in Korea, the Australian
Government has generously agreed to make H.MA.S. Sydney
available for Korean service for three months from October."

(0 The Tirnes, ]2th May 1951


GALLANTRY IN KOREA
AWARDS TO ROYAL MARINES

Awards to members of 41 Independent Commando, Royal Marines,
for gallant and distinguished service in Korea, were announced in the
London Gazette last night.
The Commanding Officer, Major (Acting Lieutenant-Colonel)
Douglas Bums Drysdale, of Haslemere, Surrey, is made a Companion
of the Distinguished Service Order, and the Military Cross is awarded
to Captain (Local Major) Dennis Leolin Samuel St. Maur Aldridge,
Captain Leslie George Marsh, of Southboume, Bournemouth, and
Captain Patrick John Ovens, of Cirencester.
The Military Medal is awarded to Colour Sergeant (Acting
Quartermaster Sergeant) James Baines, of Plymouth; Marine George
Bramble of Norwich; Corporal Ernest Cruse, of Exmouth; Marine
Arthur Alexander Henry Harper, of Newport, Isle of Wight; Marine
Malcolm Hine, of Milford, Surrey; Sergeant Reginald William David
James, of Southsea; Corporal Henry Langton, of Liverpool; Corporal
Gersham Maindonald of St. Peter Port, Guernsey; and Marine Richard
Twigg.

(0 The Times, ]9th May 1951

 KOREA CASUALTIES

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - Previously reported killed
in error, now located - Private D. Fox.

Previously reported missing now located -
Private 0. Smith, Private H. Graham.

ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - WOLTNDED - Corporal W. Colleton,
Lance Corporal A.J. Thomson, Rifleman T. Gorman,
Fusilier J. McKie.

Previously reported missing - now located -
Rifleman H.M. Bannon.

Previously reported missing - now located (wounded) -
Rifleman B. Stoner.

(0 The Times, ]9th May 1951


HMS GLORY & HMS KENYA
IN ACTION

American troops are being rushed forward to try to plug the gap
cut in two South Korean divisions which have been badly mauled
with several of their units being caught in ambushes as they were
retreating. One strong allied tank force was also ambushed on the
same front but managed to fight its way out down a dry river bed.
Navy aircraft from four allied carriers were among those which took
part in operations yesterday. United States pilots flying from the
carriers Princefon, Boxer, and Philippine Sea concentrated on close
air support in the eastern sector, while British aircraft - Sea Furies and
Fireflies - flew from HMS. Glory to make heavy attacks on gun
emplacements and troop concentrations in the area of Chinnampo.
The British cruiser Kenya, also operating on the west coast, shelled
troop concentrations on the Changsan peninsula, and, in collaboration
with air spotters sent up from HMS. Glory, shelled the area west of
Songhwa, 30 miles south-west of Chinnampo.

(C The Times, 19th May 1951


KOREA CASUALTIES

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS - MISSING -
Fusilier J. Martin.

GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - MISSING -
Private G. Green, Private W. Hawkes.

ROYAL ULSTER RIFLES - MISSING - Rifleman B. Mulligan.

Previously reported missing, in error - Rifleman R.J. Mulligan.

(0 The Time,@, 26th May 1951

- 64 -

 WOUNDED GLOSTER FOUND

New York, May 2 7 - Greek troops on the lmj in river front, who
overran hills where the Gloucestershire battalion made its stand,
found one dazed and wounded Englishman, Lionel Essex, who had
been cared for by a Korean family behind enemy lines for 33 days.
He was wounded in the arm and leg.

(0 The Times, 28th May 1951


KOREA REPORTER KILLED BY MINE

Pusan, South Korea, Sunday - Derek Arthur Gordon Pearcy,
London-bom Reuter-Australian Associated Press correspondent
in Korea, was killed when his jeep ran over a mine on the western
front yesterday. An officer in the jeep was also killed and the driver
seriously wounded.
Pearcy, who was 25 on Friday, is the fourteenth correspondent to be
killed in Korea.
The niineburst occurred at the Canadian 25th Brigade command
post. Vehicles had been running over the spot for days.
In his last dispatch from the Korea front, written on Friday and
delayed, Pearcy told of khaki-bereted Canadians of the 25th Infantry
Brigade going into battle at dawn for the first time.
"Their small arms were at the ready, their eyes alert for the slightest
movement ahead of them. The first shot rang out. The infantrymen
ducked for cover, fanned out and fired at a hill on their flank. There
was a short silence, then a rattle of Sten guns, then silence again. The
Canadians turned North again and the advance resumed."

(0 Reuter Archives, 28th May 1951


CEREMONY IN H.M.S. THESEUS

From Our Own Correspondent, Portvmouth, May 29 - The aircraft
carrier Theseus (Captain A.S. Bolt, R.N.) arrived here to-day after a
period of active service in Korean waters, and was presented with the
Boyd Trophy at a ceremony on the flight deck. The trophy was
presented by Admiral of the Fleet Lord Fraser of North Cape, First
Sea Lord, and received by Lieutenant-Commander M.P.G. Smith,
R.N., in command of the air group of the Theseus.
Lord Fraser, making the presentation, said that the prestige of the
Royal Navy, particularly the Naval Air Arm, was the highest possible,
and the Theseus had set an example of how things should be done.
"For that our American friends have given you full testimony."
The trophy was won by the air group, which comprises No.807 Sea
Fury and No.810 Firefly squadrons, for carrying out 1,444 sorties
without accident and with an average serviceability of over 90
percent, during operations in October, November, and December of
last year. The Boyd Trophy is awarded yearly for the finest feat of
aviation in the Navy.

(0 The Times 30th May 1951


CASUALTIES IN KOREA

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS - WOUNDED -
Fusilier F.A. Bainbridge.

GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - Previously reported
missing - now located (wounded) in hospital - Private L. Essex.

 ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS - WOUNDED -
Corporal D. Hilton.

The Times, 2nd June 1951


MR ACHESON PRAISES GLOUCESTERS

From Our Own Correspondent, Washington, June 3 - While being
questioned by the senate committee yesterday the Secretary of State
paid a tribute to the 1 st Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment,
calling their fight "one of the great stories in military history."
"It was very gallant," he said. "It was a superb thing ... they held
up the entire advance of the Chinese in the western sector until the
rest of the troops could get themselves into position."
The exploit of the Gloucesters seemed at first to be too little
understood and too little appreciated in the United States. This was
the result of the accidental circumstance that there was only one
American correspondent - representing the Christian Science Monito
- at that part of the front at the time.

(0 The Times, 4th June 1951


THE ROLL OF HONOUR

The following casualties incurred in action in Korea have been
notified to the War Office:

8TH HUSSARS - WOUNDED - Captain G.N.R. Whitfield.

THE KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS - Officers -
WOUNDED - Lieutenant A.H.F. MeMillan-Scott,
2nd Lieutenant E.R. Mudie.

Other Ranks - KILLED - Private H.J. Banton, Private A.B. Clark,
Corporal J. Gallagher, Private J. Millar (A. and S.H. art K.O.S.B.),
Private J.H. Purdie.

WOUNDED - Private J.C. Aitchison Private A.J. Bennett (A. and
S.H. art K.O.S.B.), Corporal N. Campbell, Corporal R.S. Clelland,
Lance Corporal J. Conaghan, Private N.A. Cunningham (A. and S.H.
art K.O.S.B.), Private D. Cathrall, Private K.A. Davis, Private W.H.
Dougherty, Private J.D. Elmalie (A. and S.H. art K.O.S.B.), Private A
Forrest, Private R.A. Hudson (A. and S.H. art K.O.S.B.), Private R.P.
Hastie, Sergeant J. McMillan, Private A. Nicoll, Private J. Shaw,
Private G.M. Wilson (A. and S.H. art K.O.S.B.), Corporal C.B.
Wilkinson, Private D. Whitelaw.

THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT - KILLED -
Private A.L. Bailey.

WOUNDED - Private J. Harris.

Previously reported wounded, now reported missing -
Private J.L. Harris (Wiltshires art Glosters).

THE KING'S SHROPSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY - KILLED -
Lance Corporal W. Hanlon, Corporal K.A. Richardson.

DIED OF WOUNDS - Lance Corporal G.A. Yapp.

WOUNDED - Lance Corporal. F. Bayley, Private R.K. Brown,
Private T. Bagnall, Private W.T. Bames (Middlesex art K.S.L.I.),
Corporal R.W. Griffiths, Private R.S. Gordon, Private J.D. Garman
(R. Sussex art K.S.L.I.), Private S.G. Patworth, Private T. Sheldrake,
Private HR. Seabright, Private H.W. Sellens (Middlesex art K.S.L.I.)
Private E.G. Stone, Private R. Smith.

- 65 -

 ROYAL ARMY SERVICE CORPS - KILLED -
Driver W.C. Greenwood.

WOUNDED - Driver J. Blackwell.

(0 The Times, 9th June 1951


U.S. DECORATIONS
FOR BRITISH TROOPS

The War Office announced last night that the King has approved
the following American decorations to British troops in recognition
of gallant and distinguished services in Korea:

SILVER STAR MEDAL - Brigadier T. Brodie, late Infant%-
Brigadier B.A. Coad, late Infantry; Lieutenant-Colonel G.L. eilson,

 Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders; Major J.B. Gilties, Argyll and
Sutherland Highlanders; Captain C.N.A. Buchanan, Argyll and
Sutherland Highlanders (missing); 2nd Lieutenant G.A. White, Royal
Army Ordnance Corps, (posthumous).

BRONZE STAR MEDAL - Major R.A. Gwyn, Middlesex
Regiment; Major I.D. McN. Reith, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
(posthumous). Major J.D. Stewart, Argyll and Sutherland
Highlanders; @aptain W.H. Ellery, Royal Northumberland Fusiliers',
Captain D.W.VP. O'Flaherty, Royal Artillery; Sergeant D.B.
Hummerstone, Middlesex Regiment, (since killed in action); Sergeant
J.C. Robertson, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders; Corporal G.N.
Cross, Royal Engineers; Corporal J. Walker, Argyll and Sutherland
Highlanders; Sapper J.C. Hannon, Royal Engineers; Sapper A.F.J.
Preston, Royal Engineers.

(0 The Timey, 9th June 1951


- 66 -

o

 

JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000           50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS           27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Private  D.G. FLUCK 19 1 Glosters 13 June 1951
2nd Lieutenant B.S. GAEL 19 1 Glosters 17 June 1951
Gunner  MICKLETHWAITE 30 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regt 17 June 1951
Fusilier J.H. PEDLEY 31 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 20 June 1951
Private R. HIGHAM 33 A.C.C. art 57 Company R.A.S.C. 20 June 1951
Private L. BELL 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 23 June 1951
Private G.E. BALL 35 Royal Engineers 55 Indep Field Sqn 23 June 1951
Capt H.BAYTON-EVANS MC & Bar 28 Royal Engineers 55 Indep Field Sqii 23 June 1951
Sapper  HIGGINS 19 Royal Engineers 55 Indep Field Sqn 23 June 1951
Lieutenant G.B. ROBINSON 27 Royal Engineers 55 Indep Field Sqn 23 June 1951
Fusilier H.H.D. BLOW 27 Lincolns att 1 R.U.R. 24 June 1951
Rifleman  R. CRAIG 23 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 25 June 1951
Lance Bombardier R.E. HINDLE 32 Royal Artillery 11 LAA Bty 25June 1951


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000              50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS                 27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Lieutenant J. H. SHARP 28 Royal Navy HMS Glory 812 Sqn 28 June 1951
A.C. 1  G. B. WELLS DSM 29 Royal Navy HMS Glory 812 Sqn 28 June 1951
Private R.J. GRAY 19 1 Glosters 29 June 1951
Corporal E. J. GREEN 29 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 29 June 1951
Rifleman H. H. JONES 26 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 29 June 1951
Trooper C. ADAMS 33 8tb Hussars HQ Sqn Recce 02 July 1951
Corporal F. C. H. CAMERON 24 8th Hussars HQ Sqn Recce 03 July 1951
Private V. T. BOWL 25 1 Glosters 03 July 1951
Private B. L. JACKSON 24 1 Glosters 04 July 1951
Rifleman S. ROBINSON 20 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 July 1951
Corporal R.D. WEAVER 21 1 Middlesex 05 July 1951
Fusilier C. MILLS 23 E. Yorks art 1 R.N.F. 07 July 1951
Corporal R. F. FIRTH 25 Duke of Wellington's art Glosters 10 July 1951
Sub Lieutenant I. R. SHEPLEY - Royal Navy HMS Glory 812 Sqn 16 July 1951
Lieutenant R. WILLIAMS 24 Royal Navy HMS Glory 812 Sqn 16 July 1951


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000            50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS              27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Commissioned Pilot T.W. SPARKE 20 Royal Navy HMS Glory 804 Sqn 18 July 1951
Lance Corporal R.A. SMITH 30 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 18 July 1951
Private A.D. MAILE 20 1 Middlesex 20 July 1951
Corporal K. TRUMAN 29 Royal Military Police 22 July 1951
Private R.F. BLACKLOCK 23 1 K.O.S.B. 28 July 1951
Rifleman J. J. KERR 35 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 29 July 1951
Lance Corporal G.B. SWARBRICK 20 Royal Engineers RHQ Troop 31 July 1951
Private B.G. GALLOP 19 1 Glosters 01 August 1951
Private F.W. SHELTON 30 1 Glosters 01 August 1951
Rifleman M. REIDY 31 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 02 August 1951
Sergeant D.R. KINNEAR 21 R. Military Police (S.I.B.) 05 August 1951
Private D.M.J. TRANTHEM 24 R.A.S.C. 1 HQ Exped. Force Inst./NAAFI 05 August 1951
Corporal D.N. FELLOWS 20 1 K.S.L.I. 07 August 1951
Private R.T. OTHEN 21 1 Glosters 11 August 1951
Corporal E. STONE 28 8th Hussars 'C' Squadron 12 August 1951
 28 Field Engineer Regiment


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000             50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS               27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Rifleman R. CUNNINGHAM 25 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 17 August 1951
Gunner T. FOX 26 Royal Artillery HQ 1 Comwel Div 17 August 1951
Private L. RUSSELL 33 R.A.0.C. 1 Indep. Field Regiment 1 8 August 1951
Corporal J.S. LIVETT 29 8th Hussars HQ Sqn Recce 18 August 1951
Sergeant R. L. R. LAMB 29 Royal Air Force art 77 Sqdn. R.A.A.F. 22 August 1951
Sergeant C. E. BARNES 29 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 30 August 1951
Lieutenant J. G. HARWOOD 24 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 30 August 1951
Rifleman E. B. LYONS 26 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 31 August 1951
Trooper W. E. THOMAS 24 8th Hussars C Squadron 02 September 1951
Sergeant L. KAVANAGH 33 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 04 September 1951
Private L.C. PAYNE 20 1 Glosters 05 September 1951
Rifleman H. HOWARTH 35 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 07 September 1951
Gunner J. E. TRACEY 29 Royal Artillery 170 Mortar Bty 'C'Tp. 08 September 1951
Sapper V. A. MEDUS 19 Royal Engineers 28 Field Eng. Regt. 09 September 1951
Lieutenant P.A. GRANT 24 Seaforths att 1 K.O.S.B. 09 September 1951
 


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000          50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS        27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Captain  A. V  JENKINS 27 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regt 14 September 1951
Private F. FITZPATRICK 21 Sherwood Foresters att 1 R.N.F. 14 September 1951
Private L. BRICKWOOD 19 1 K.S.L.I. 15 September 1951
Private D. SUMNER 21 Middlesex art 1 K.S.L.I. 15 September 1951
Private  J. NICOLL 20 Black Watch att 1 K.O.S.B. 20 September 1951
Fusilier  R. SOUTH 19 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 20 September 1951
Lance Corporal D. D. MEW 29 1 Glosters 21 September 1951
Private  R. H. CHAM 30 1 Glosters 22 September 1951
Sub Lieutenant R. G. A, DAVEY 20 Royal Navy HMS Glory 812 Sqn 22 September 1951
2nd Lieutenant K.G. HODGKINS 22 Borders att 1 R.U.R. 23 September 1951
Gunner G. A. SNELL 30 Royal Artillery 45 Field Regt 23 September 1951
Captain J. B. WARREN 27 Royal Artillery 170 Mortar Bty 23 September 1951
Corporal G.L.S. LEE 20 1 Glosters 25 September 1951
Major G. G. BELL MBE - R. Tank Regt. British Legation, Pusan 27 September 1951
Rifleman  D. MAHER 28 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 28 September 1951
 Rifleman J. FOLEY 20 1 Royal Ulster Rifles 01 October 1951
 Private N.L. McDOUGALL 20 1 Black Watch att 1 K.O.S.B. 03 October 1951


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000            50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS             27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Corporal J. R.. CRON 29 1 K.O.S.B. 03 October 1951
Private E. MORELAND 19 1 K.O.S.B. 03 October 1951
Private S. RENNIE 19 1 K.O.S.B. 03 October 1951
Private T. Mc. D. SINCLAIR 27 1 K.O.S.B. 03 October 1951
Private A. BUCHAN 21 A&SH att 1 K.O.S.B. 03 October 1951
Private W. NISBETT 22 A&SH att 1 K.O.S.B. 03 October 1951
Private J.A. MUNDY 19 1 K.S.L.I. 03 October 1951
Private J. STRATHIE 20 Essex att 1 K.S.L.I. 03 October 1951
Captain G. H. F. BEITH 31 R.A.M.C. att HQ Sqn 8th Hussars 03 October 1951
Driver R.V. F. GODW1N 25 R.A.S.C. att HQ Sqn 8th Hussars 03 October 1951
W02 (CSM) W. HALL 30 1 K.O.S.B. 04 October 1951
Private W. F. A. FORD 21 Royal Leicestershires art 1 K.S.L.I. 04 October 1951
Private R. LEGGETT 21 1 K.S.L.I. 05 October 1951
Private R. MAXWELL 23 1 K.O.S.B. 05 October 1951
Lance Corporal L. G. LEACH 24 Duke of Welington's att 1 RN.F. 05 October 1951
Fusilier C. H. BUCKTHORPE 24 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 05 October 1951
Fusilier T. H. CASPER 22 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 06 October 1951
Fusilier 1. CORBETT 34 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 06 October 1951
Fusilier P. DUTTON 19 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 06 October 1951
Fusilier R. M. KEENAN 22 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 06 October 1951
 

 


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000           50th.  ANNIVERSARY YEARS           27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Fusilier C.G. LEONARD 30 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 06 October 1951
Sergeant K. SMITH 22 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 06 October 1951
Corporal G.V. WALLS 26 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 06 October 1951
Fusilier A. WILLIAMSON 19 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 06 October 1951
Lieutenant J.C.F. WALKER 22 Greys art 8th Hussars HQ/'B'Sqn 06 October 1951
Gunner H. BREAKWELL 19 Royal Artillery 170 Mortar Bty 06 October 1951
Gumer R.E. DOWKES 20 Royal Artillery 170 Mortar Bty 06 October 1951
Phvate R.H. SMITH 24 R. Warwick att 1 R.N.F. 06 October 1951
Private W.R. BRIGGS 22 Sherwood Foresters att 1 R.N,F. 06 October 1951
Lieutenant L.D. FOXTON 22 York & Lancs att 1 R.N.F. 06 October 1951
Fusilier D. BROADHEAD 24 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 07 October 1951
Fudlier A. BROTHERSTON 19 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 07 October 1951
Fusilier G. COOPER 20 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 07 October 1951
Fusilier G. HODGSON 25 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 07 October 1951
Fusilier F. VICKERS 25 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 07 October 1951
Private R. SHEDDEN 19 1 K.O.S.B. 08 October 1951
Licutennt D.A. WHITE 23 E. Yorks art 1 R. Northumberland Fus. 09 October 1951
Marine A.J. ALDRICH 19 Royal Marines 41 Indep. Commando 10 October 1951
Private G.R. LAND 19 1 K.S.L.I. 11 October 1951

 

 


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000               50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS                  27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Trooper S.J. O'CONNOR 28 8th Hussars 'C' Squadron 11 October 1951
Private J.D. BUTLER 20 1 K.O.S.B. 12 October 1951
Lance Corporal T.E. OWEN 24 A&SH att 1 K.O.S.B. 14 October 1951
Corporal K.E. ROBERTS 22 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 16 October 1951
Private J. MOYES 31 1 Glosters 17 October 1951
Fusilier J. GEPARD 30 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 17 October 1951
Sapper B.A. BEAUCHAMP 19 Royal Engineers 12 Field Sqn t 20 October 1951
Private P.C. RESSIA 20 1 K.O.S.B. 21 October 1951
Corporal R.W. WELLINGTON 24 1 Glosters 24 October 1951
Sapper K. McDONAGH 21 Royal Engineers 3 Troop 12 Fd Sqnt 24 October 1951
Corporal A.J. POWELL 22 1 Glosters 25 October 1951
Lance Corporal J. COOK 26 A&SH att 1 K.O.S.B. 28 October 1951
Private D.A.W. ANDERSON 22 1 K.O.S.B. 28 October 1951
Sergeant E.E.C. NEWMAN GM 29 1 K.O.S.B. 28 October 1951
Private G.H. GROOM 19 1 Glosters 29 October 1951
Lance Corporal J. POMFRET 21 Royal Engineers HQ Troop 12 Field Sqn † 30 October 1951
Fusilier A. JAMES 31 1 Royal Northumberland Fus. 01 November 1951 

†  28 Field Engineer Regiment

 


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000            50th.  ANNIVERSARY YEARS             27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Private C. McHALE 24 A&SH art 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Private L.G. APTER 27 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Pdvate R. CRELLIN 22 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Private T.M. DOWIE 22 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
privmc W.A.M. EDMUND 25 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Private D.MacN. FOSTER 19 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Private T.W. HALDANE 22 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Private A.E. HOBBS 19 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Corporal  J.F. KERR 24 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Private T.G. McKAY 22 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Private R. McKENDRICK 19 1 K.O.S.B. att A&SH 04 November 1951
Private J.C.L. McLACHLAN 19 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Lieutenant A.H.F. McMILLAN-SCOTT 23 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Private D. MEIKLE 22 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
W02 (CSM) J. MORRIS 35 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Sergeant A.R. MUNN 23 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Corporal R.F. MUSGRAVE 27 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Corporal T.W. PRICE 25 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Private J. WRIGHT 19 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000           50th.  ANNIVERSARY YEARS             27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Private F.W. HOLDER 30 1 K.S.L.I. 04 November 1951
Private R.S.J. PRING 21 1 K.S.L.I. 04 November 1951
Major A.R. TAITT 35 1 K. S. L. 1. 04 November 1951
Sergeant A . WILSON 33 1 K.S.L.I. 04 November 1951
Corporal K. JAMES 25 1Royal Leicestershire Regiment 04 November 1951
Lance Corporal R. TAYLOR 23 1Royal Leicestershire Regiment 04 November 1951
Private D. SMITH 21 A&SH att 1 K.O.S.B. 04 November 1951
Private F. COLLINS 23 A&SH att 1 K.O.S.B. 05 November 1951
Private E. LOCKETT 26 A&SH att 1 K.O.S.B. 05 November 1951
Sergeant S.J. SUTHERLAND 24 A&SH att 1 K.O.S.B. 05 November 1951
Private H.M. BPADY 31 1 K.O.S.B. 05 November 1951
Private J. MACKIN 19 1K.O.S.B. 05 November 1951
Private R.F. MORTON 23 1 K.O.S.B. 05 November 1951
Private J.H. RODGER 22 1 K.O.S.B. 05 November 1951
Private G.N. HUNTER 28 1Glosters 05 November 1951
Private B.M. ASH 21 1Royal Leicestershire Regiment 05 November 1951
Private R.A. ASTELL 19 1Royal Leicestershire Regiment 05 November 1951
Private E. BURNHAM 19 1Royal Leicestershire Regiment 05 November 1951
Private R. CHAMBERLAIN 20 1Royal Leicestershire Regiment 05 November 1951
Private J. CLAYTON 19 1Royal Leicestershire Regiment 05 November 1951


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000             50th.  ANNIVERSARY YEARS            27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Corporal J.L. CLIFT 27 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment          05 November 1951
Private R.J. DEPRY 20 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment           05 November 1951
Private R.L. GRAY 19 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment            05 November 1951
Private M. O'GARA 19 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment         05 November 1951
Sergeant E.W. PARR 25 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment         05 November 1951
Private F. PENNINGTON 19 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 05 November 1951
2nd Lieut W.K. ROBERTS 21 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 05 November 1951
Private R. SMITH 19 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment               05 November 1951
Private R  SUGDEN 19   1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment         05 November 1951
Private H. S. TOPPING 19 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment       05 November 1951
Private J. TYNAN 19 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment               05 November 1951
Fusilier F. KENYON 26 1 Royal Northumberland Fus.                05 November 1951
Sgt. A. PHILLIPS  MM. 34 R Warwicks att 1 R Leicestershires   05 November 1951
Pnvate T. C. JACKSON 20 R.E.M.E.  10 Infantry Workshop        05 November 1951
Private D. JONES 22 1 K.S.L.I.                                                    07 November 1951
Fusilier J. N. BURN 22 R.N.Fus. att 1 Royal Leicestershires        07 November 1951
Private A. L. SAUNDERS 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment             10 November 1951


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000            50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS              27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Private H. CROCKER 25 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 11 November 1951
Private F. J. FERRIDAY 24 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 13 November 1951
Corporal E.W. SMITH 23 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 13 November 1951
Corporal R. L. V. HURST MID 32 1 Glosters 16 November 1951
Private J. H. EADSFORTH 23 1 K.S.L.I. 16 November 1951
Private L. JACKSON 19 1 K.S.L.I. 16 November 1951
Private P. J. DAVIS 19 1 K.S.L.I. 17 November 1951
Private M. J. HALL 19 1 K.S.L.I. 17 November 1951
Lance Corporal P. D. JONES 19 1 K.S.L.I. 17 November 1951
Corporal J. PINKERTON 21 1 K.S.L.I. 17 November 1951
Private J. D. PRICE 19 1 K.S.L.I. 17 November 1951
Corporal M. RITTERBAND 26 1 K.S.L.I. 17 November 1951
Private T. SHELDRAKE 19 1 K.S.L.I. 17 November 1951
Private G. SIBLEY 19 1 K.S.L.I. 17 November 1951
Private J. SPLEVINS 33 1K.S.L.I. 17 November 1951
Private L.R. TURNBULL 24 1 K.S.L.I. 17 November 1951
Private D. WELLS 22 1 K.S.L.I. 17 November 1951
Private C. W. L. COX 22 Middlesex art 1 K.S.L.I. 17 November 1951


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000             50th.  ANNIVERSARY YEARS            27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Private N. A. BIRCH 23 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 17 November 1951
Private D. H. BUCKLEY 19 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 17 November 1951
Private F GILL 20 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 17 November 1951
2nd. Leiutenant J. A. GODFREY 19 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 17 November 1951
Private R. SHARMAN 19 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 17 November 1951
Private L. WHITMORE 20 R Warwicks att 1 R Leicestershires 17 November 1951
Lance Corporal S. J. BLTNCE 26 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 18 November 1951
Private C. SALMON 21 1Royal Leicestershire Regiment 18 November 1951
Private L. E. WISHER 22 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 18 November 1951
Private A. J. A. BULLMAN 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 18 November 1951
Lance Corporal A.E. BYRNE 22 1 K.S.L.1, 18 November 1951
Private G. CLARKE 19 1 K.S.L.I. 18 November 1951
Private CRIDLAND 21 1 K.S.L.I. 18 November 1951
Private E. M. HALLIGAN 25 1 K.S.L.I. 18 November 1951
Private L. HOPSON 22 1 K.S.L.I. 18 November 1951
Private M. L. STEPHENS 19 1 K.S.L.I. 18 November 1951
Private J. B. STPAUGHAN 20 1 K.S.L.I. 19 November 1951
Private D. WALKER 19 West Yorkshire att 1 R. Leicestershires 19 November 1951
 

 


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000          50th.  ANNIVERSARY YEARS           27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


2nd Lieut P. J. AFFENTRANGER 19 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 20 November 1951
Lance Corporal M. R. FITTS 20 1 K.O.S.B. 20 November 1951
Corporal S.F.I. JACKSON 24 1 K.O.S.B. 20 November 1951
Fusilier H. SHEPHERD 21 R.N. Fus.att 1 Royal Leicestershires 20 November 1951
Fusilier R. J. EARDLEY 22 R.N.Fus. att 1 Royal Leicestershires 20 November 1951,.'
Private J. SMITH 28 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 21 November 1951
Captain R. F. WASHBROOK 30 Royal Artillery 45 Fld Regt 70 Fld Bty 21 November 1951
Private G.R. LYE 19 1 K.S.L.I. 22 November 1951
Private C.C. CROMPTON 19 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 23 November 1951
Lance Corporal W. B. THOMPSON 23 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 23 November 1951,
WO 1 (RSM) C.W. CHESHIRE 53 R.A.S.C. 23 November 1
Private D. A. FISHER 24 Middlesex att 1 K.S.L.I. 24 November 1
Private A. CAMPBELL 23 Glosters att 1 Royal Norfolks 26 November 1
Lieutenant H.C. CABPAL 22 1 Glosters 27 November 1951
Private JR. COCORAN 24 1 Welch 30 November 1951
2nd Lieutenant J. K. A. FIRTH 21 Royal Engineers, 55 Field Sqn † 01 December 1951,
Able Seaman C. SKELTON - Royal Navy HMS Cockade 01 December 1951
Signalman P.P. WARE 19 R.Signals 4 Sqn 1 Comwel Div Sig Regt 02 December 1951
Private V. R. SIVILL 21 1 K.S.L.I. 11 December 1951,
 † 28 Field Engineer Regiment
 


JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000           50th.  ANNIVERSARY YEARS           27 JULY 2003


IN MEMORIAM

Corporal N. FENEMER 21 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 13 December 1951
Corporal B. J. ORAM 25 1 Welch 15 December 1951
Signalman P.N. LATHAM 21 R. Signals att 5 R Inniskilling D.G. 16 December 1951
Sergeant S. M. COX, MM 30 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 21 December 1951
Lance Corporal J. E. HAMPTON 19 1 Welch 22 December 1951
Private T. J. WATKINS 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 24 December 1951
Private J.P. RICHARDS 23 1 Glosters att 1 Welch Regiment 25 December 1951
Private J. J.. BURKE 19 1 Welch 27 December 1951
Private D. HARROWER 22 A&SH att 1 K.O.S.B. 01 January 1952
Flight Lieut D. F. W. HINTON DFC 29 Royal Air Force att USAAF F84 Unit 02 January 1952
Private E.W. PARTRIDGE 31 1 Glosters 04 January 1952
Sapper J. GOODMAN 22 Royal Engineers 28 Field Eng Regt 06 January 1952
Lance Corporal H. A. AHERN 22 1 Welch 10 January 1952
Private B.C. CHARD 19 1 Welch 10 January 1952
Private K. W. KENWAY 19 1 Welch 10 January 1952
Private WE. LANSDOWN 19 1 Welch 10 January 1952
2nd. Lieutenant S.C.J. BURGESS 20 1 Welch 11 January 1952
Private W.P. MOORE 19 1 Welch 13 January 1952
Private R.J. GOODWIN 21 1 Welch 14 January 1952
Private J. A. LIVELY 19 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 16 January 1952
Lance Corporal G. E. MOSS 23 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 16 January 1952
Private R. R. BROOKS 19 R.A.P.C. 31 CPO 23 January 1952
Private H. G. LUMMIS 24 1 K.O.S.B. 26 January 1952
Trooper D. R. VEASEY 19 5 R. Inniskilling D.G. Recce Troop 26 January 1952

 

 


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000            50th.  ANNIVERSARY YEARS             27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Signalman W. SMITH 20 Royal Signals 1 Comwel Div Sig Regt 28 January 1952
Sapper J.G. HUNTER 21 Royal Engineers 55 Field Squadron 29 January 1952
2nd Lieutenant D.M. HOCKRIDGE 20 Sherwood Foresters att 1 R. Leics 06 February 1952
2nd Lieutenant P.A. St. CLAIR-MORFORD 21 1 K.S.L.I. 07 February 1952
Private N. BABBAGE 19 Welch att 1 Glosters 09 February 1952
Corporal R. S. GREAVES 27 1 Welch 09 February 1952
Private W. L. MORGAN 24 1 Welch 15 February 1952
Lieutenant P.M. PARK 25 Royal Engineers 28 Field Engineer Regt 16 February 1952
Private T. STARK 19 1 K.O.S.B. 23 February 1952
Gunner J. A. CLOAKE 19 Royal Artillery 61 Lt Regt 26 February 1952
Sergeant F. W. CHATTERTON 21 Royal Engineers HQ 28 Fid Eng. Regt. 26 February 1952
Corporal E. J. E. DAVIES 22 Royal Engineers 64 Field Park Sqn. 26 February 1952
Private W.J. WARD 22 1 Welch 28 February 1952
Corporal F. M. HAYES 25 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 01 March 1952
2nd Lieutenant J. C.. TRIBBECK 20 Sherwood Foresters att 1 R. Leics 01 March 1952
Private L.W. YOUNG 23 1 K.S.L.I. 02 March 1952
Private J.T.S. BROAW 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 03 March 1952
Private R. W. SCOTT 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 03 March 1952
Lance Corporal N. S. SMITH 20 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 03 March 1952
Corporal T. R. HAMILL 22 Royal Marines HMS Belfast 03 March 1952
Sergeant J. H. JAMES 33 Royal Marines HMS Belfast 03 March 1952
Sapper G. R. SIDDLE 21 Royal Engineers 28 Field Eng. Regiment 05 March 1952
Private F. NORTH 22 1 K.O.S.B. 07 March 1952
 † 28 Field Engineer Regiment
 


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000          50th.  ANNIVERSARY YEARS            27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Wing Com J.R. BALDWIN DSO DFC AFC 34 Royal Air Force att 51st Fighter 15 March 1952
Interceptor Wing U.S.A.A.F.
Lieutenant R.J. OVERTON 26 Royal Navy HMS Glory 804 Sqn 15 March 1952
Lance Corporal R.W. MORGAN 3 1 R.A.S.C. 16 March 1952
Sergeant H.F. RICHARDS MM 32 Royal East Kent Regiment art 1 K.S.L.I. 23 March 1952
Lance Corporal J.E. WATSON 20 1 K.O.S.B. 25 March 1952
Private G.W. HARRISON 19 1 K.O.S.B. 27 March 1952
Sergeant E.M. HALL 24 Intelligence Corps 904 Field Security 31 March 1952
Private E.G. RUNDLE 19 1 K.S.L.I. 01 April 1952
Corporal R.C. LEWIS 21 1 K.S.L.I. 04 April 1952
Private P.M. TRIGGS 19 1 K.S.L.I. 04 April 1952
Private W.MCD. GOSNELL 22 1 K.O.S.B. 05 April 1952
Private I.C. WALLACE 20 1 K.O.S.B. 05 April 1952
Corporal F.J. CASWELL 21 Royal Engineers 3 Troop 55 Fld Sqn † 06 April 1952
Sapper E.H. COMER 21 Royal Engineers 3 Troop 55 Fld Sqn † 06 April 1952
Sapper R.O. DICKS 21 Royal Engineers 3 Troop 55 Fld Sqn † 06 April 1952
Sapper T.K. EVANS 22 Royal Engineers 3 Troop 55 Fld Sqn † 06 April 1952
Sapper L.E. WICK 22 Royal Engineers 3 Troop 55 Fld Sqn  †06 April 1952
Private J.H. RABONE 24 1 Royal Leicestershire Regiment 16 April 1952
Able Seaman J. BRAVINGTON 21 Royal Navy HMS Concord 23 April 1952
Able Seaman A.B.F. GREENWOOD 20 Royal Navy HMS Concord 23 April 1952
Fusilier M. KILLEEN 21 R.N.F. att 1 Royal Leicestershires 28 April 1952
Corporal J. RICHARDSON 25 1 Welch 30 April 1952
† 28 Field Engineer Regiment

 


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000              50th.  ANNIVERSARY YEARS               27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Private C. LEEMING 23 E. Yorks att 1 R. Leicestershires 01 May 1952
Private W. PHILPOTT 23 R. Sussex att 1 K.S.L.I. 01 May 1952
Driver N. ROBSON 19 R.A.S.C. 57 Company 01 May 1952
Private W. ARMOUR 19 1 K.O.S.B. 04 May 1952
2nd Lieutenant G.K. BRIGGS 22 Royal Engineers 28 Field Eng Regt 04 May 1952
Driver C.B. WARD - Royal Army Service Corps 05 May 1952
Gunner D.G. HILL 19 R. Artillery 61 Lt Regt 15 Loc Bty 09 May 1952
Sapper A.J.W. RINGE 23 Royal Engineers 3 Troop 55 Fld Sqn † 11 May 1952
Private M. FLYNN 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 12 May 1952
Lieutenant K. MacDONALD 26 Royal Navy HMS Ocean 802 Sqn 14 May 1952
Signalman D.L. SAUNDERS 21 Royal Signals 1 Comwel Div Sig Regt 17 May 1952
Private D.L. HOBDEN 24 1 Glosters 18 May 1952
Lieut.Com T. J.C. WILLIAMSON-NAPIER 29 Royal Navy HMS Ocean 825 Sqn 19 May 1952
Aircrewman Ist Class L.M. EDWARDS 30 Royal Navy HMS Ocean 825 Sqn 19 May 1952
Naval Airman Ist Cl. R.F. HERBERT 19 Royal Navy HMS Ocean 19 May 1952
Gunner D. BROADBENT 19 Royal Artillery 20 May 1952
Corporal R. BREWER 25 5 R. Inniskilling D.G. 'A: Squadron 26 May 1952
Private R.H. McDONALD 21 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 30 May 1952
2nd Lieutenant J. WORMALD 20 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 30 May 1952
Gunner R.S. COE - Royal Artillery Jap. Reinf. Base Depot 31 May 1952
Private D. ALLMAN 20 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 02 June 1952
Able Seaman A. FINDLAY 23 Royal Navy HMS Ocean 04 June 1952
Gunner K. JAYNES 23 Royal Artillery 61 Light Regt 05 June 1952
†  28 Field Engineer Regiment
 


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000          50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS         27JULY2003

IN MEMORIAM

Private E. FARROW 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 14 June 1952
Private D. I. HORTON 20 1 Welch 15 June 1952
Lieutenant-Colonel M.F. MACLEAN 41 R.A.0.C. 15 June 1952
Private L.E. MORRISON 23 R.A.S.C. 15 June 1952
Private G.E. TURNER 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 17 June 1952
Gunner D. McCAFFERTY 19 Royal Artillery 14 Field Regt 17 June 1952
Lance Corporal H.F. McKEY 19 1 Welch 19 June 1952
Private J. J. CRAGG 28 1 Glosters 22 June 1952
Private S. GREARS 19 1 Welch 23 June 1952
Corporal F.H. MEECH 30 1 Welch 23 June 1952
Captain J.K. THOMPSON MC 33 Royal Artillery 14 Field Regt 23 June 1952
Sapper G.M. HENDERSON 20 Royal Engineers 55 Field Sqn † 26 June 1952
Private W.R. COLE 20 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 26 June 1952
Private M.A. BELL 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 27 June 1952
Private J. M. MORRISON 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 27 June 1952
Corporal E.S. THORPE 21 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 27 June 1952
Private J. WOODGATE 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 27 June 1952
Corporal R.J. HANDS 24 1 Welch 28 June 1952
Private J. S. WILLIAMS 22 1 Welch 29 June 1952
Private T.D. HARRIS 21 1 Welch 02 July 1952
Private A.C.R. ROWE 19 1 Welch 02 July 1952
† 28 Field Engineer Regiment
 


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000             50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS            27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Private R.J.A. MARSHALL 19 1 K.O.S.B. 04 July 1952
Lieutenant R.C. HUNTER 28 Royal Navy HMS Ocean 825 Sqn 04 July 1952
Private P.J. CODLING 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 05 July 1952
Private A.J. PLAYFORD 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 05 July 1952
Lance Corporal D.E. LEWIS 24 Royal Fusiliers att 1 R. Norfolks 05 July 1952
Private W. KIRK 19 1 Black Watch 06 July 1952
Corporal S.H.C. AXE 24 1 K. S. L. 1. 10 July 1952
Private R. LUCKHURST 19 1 K. S. L. 1. 10 July 1952
Lieutenant A.G. PACK MC 21 1 K.S.L.I. 10 July 1952
Private R.W.D. PUNYER 19 1 K.S.L.I. 10 July 1952
Private 1. SIMPSON 19 1 Black Watch 11 July 1952
Private J. LEWIS 24 1 Black Watch 12 July 1952
Corporal H.A. STEGGLES 21 5 R. Inniskilling D.G. 'A' Squadron 12 July 1952
Lieutenant A.J. MEASOR 21 Royal Artillery 14 Field Regt 13 July 1952
Private M. HOGAN 19 1 Black Watch 14 July 1952
Private C.T.A. CHURCH 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 19 July 1952
Private J. BILNEY 40 Gordons att 1 K.O.S.B. 19 July 1952
Private J. EDMUNDS 21 1 Welch 21 July 1952
Private J. O'HARA 22 1 Welch 21 July 1952
Private J. BRAID 19 1 Black Watch 23 July 1952
 


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000            50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS              27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM

Private H.J. MULLER 19 Beds & Herts att 1 Royal Norfolks 23 July 1952
Private D.G. WEBSTER 20 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 23 July 1952
Lieutenant J.R.E. BERNEY 23 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 24 July 1952
Private N.A. HAYNES 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 24 July 1952
Private R.M. PERFECT 21 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 24 July 1952
Private K.A. WHEELER 21 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 24 July 1952
Lance Corporal F.A. RUSSELL 24 Essex att 1 Royal Norfolks 24 July 1952
Lieut.Commander D.A. DICK DSC 30 Royal Navy HMS Ocean CO 802 Sqn 24 July 1952
Lieutenant A. RENNY-TAILYOUR 23 1 Black Watch 25 July 1952
Gunner R. MORRISON 21 Royal Artillery 61 Light Regt 26 July 1952
Lieutenant J.W.H. LANYON 23 1 K.S.L.I. 26 July 1952
Private G. SHIELL 19 1 K.S.L.I. 28 July 1952
Private J. SMILES 19 1 K.S.L.I. 28 July 1952
Private E. WALKER 22 1 K.S.L.I. 28 July 1952
Private J.R.W. MATHIAS 19 1 Welch 28 July 1952
PO. Radio Elect. (Air) K.P. JORDAN 25 Royal Navy HMS Glory 802 Sqn 29 July 1952
Private R.K. EASTON 23 1 Black Watch 31 July 1952
Private R.J. GILLILAND 20 1 Black Watch 31 July 1952
Private J. NIXON 20 1 Black Watch 01 August 1952
Private J. WINTERS 19 1 Black Watch 01 August 1952
 


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000          50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS            27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Lance Corporal R. COCKS 21 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 02 August 1952
Private H.W. GRAVELING 19 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 02 August 1952
Private R. A. KETTERINGHAM 22 1 Royal Norfolk Regiment 02 August 1952
Private R. EDWARDS 20 1 Welch 03 August 1952
Private J.B. HAWKINS 19 1 Welch 03 August 1952
Private W.G. HILLMAN 22 1 Welch 03 August 1952
Lance Corporal L.WILLIAMS 19 1 Welch 03 August 1952
Private K.J. WILLICOMBE 19 1 Welch 03 August 1952
Leading Steward So LAU [LAU So] 23 Royal Navy HMS Belfast 04 August 1952
Private N.G. MACLEOD 19 1 Black Watch 04 August 1952
2nd Lieutenant D.A.S. NICOLL 20 1 Black Watch 08 August 1952
Lance Corporal E. OTLEY 19 R.A.0.C. 7th Mobile Ammo Repair 09 August 1952
Able Seaman M.J. COMFORT - Royal Navy HMS Mounts Bay 1 0 August 1952
Gunner M. BANBURY 22 Royal Artillery 61 Light Regt 28 August 1952
Fusilier F. RHODES 19 1 Royal Fusiliers 28 August 1952
Trooper J.P. CAHILL 20 5 R. Inniskilling D.G. 'C' Squadron 04 September 1952
Trooper P. McFADYEN 22 5 R. Inniskilling D.G. 'C'Squadron 04 September 1952
Lance Corporal D. METCALFE 22 5 R. Inniskilling D.G. 'C'Squadron 04 September 1952
Sergeant N.E. WYKES 22 5 R. Inniskilling D.G. 'C'Squadron 04 September 1952
 


 JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953

25 JUNE 2000          50th. ANNIVERSARY YEARS          27 JULY 2003


IN MEMORIAM


Lance Corporal P. GARWOOD 24 R.A.M.C. att 1 Royal Norfolks 13 September 1952
Lance Bombardier M.A. BRETTELL 20 Royal Artillery 61 Light Regt 14 September 1952
Sergeant R.H. BROADBENT 24 Royal Artillery 61 Light Regt 14 September 1952
W02 (BSM) C.R. WOOSNAM 31 Royal Artillery 61 Light Regt 14 September 1952
Sergeant A. JOHNSON 36 Military Provost Staff Corps 28 September 1952
Britcom Military Correction Establishment.
Lance Corporal E. HANNEN 19 1 King's 29 September 1952
Lance Corporal E. O'BRIEN 19 1 Durham Light Infantry 01 October 1952
Flying Officer O.M. CRUICKSHANK 28 Royal Air Force att 77 Sqdn R.A.A.F. 02 October 952
Sergeant F.T. WEST 25 REME. att 262 Base Provost Co RMP 06 October 1952
Signalman B.J. CLACKETT 20 Royal Signals HQ 28 Brigade 09 October 1952
Private G. P. GOODFIELD 20 1 King's 19 October 1952
Private W.A. BAKER 19 1 Black Watch 23 October 1952
W02 (CSM) W. CHAPMAN 40 1 King's 24 October 1952
Fusilier P.W. WALKER 19 1 Royal Fusiliers 30 October 1952
Fusilier F.G. SPEARS 19 1 Royal Fusiliers 01 November 1952
Private G.H. OVERY 21 1 Black Watch 02 November 1952
Private W. BLACK 19 1 Black Watch 04 November 1952
Private R.I. EVANS 20 1 Black Watch 04 November 1952
Private D.A. GILLESPIE 25 1 Black Watch 04 November 1952
Private T.B. GORMLEY 21 1 Black Watch 04 November 1952
Private R.A. GREENSHIELDS 19 1 Black Watch 04 November 1952
Corporal J.S.R. REEKIE 21 1 Black Watch 04 November 1952
Mvate R. SHAW 22 1 Black Watch 04 November 1952
2nd Lieutenant J.G.M. MEGUIGAN 19 Camerons att 1 Black Watch 04 November 1952

 

JUNE 1950 KOREAN WAR JULY 1953
25 JUNE 2000 50T11 ANNIVERSARY YEARS 27 JULY 2003

IN MEMORIAM


Trooper J.W. GRACE 19 5 R. Inniskilling D.G. 'X Squadron 05 November 1952
Sergeant G.S. STONE 25 R.A.P.C. 09 November 1952
Corporal E.E. HINE 30 1 B] ack Watch 10 November 1952
Private J.W. PATRICK 20 1 Black Watch 10 November 1952
Captain P. CROFTON 30 Royal Engineers HQ 28 Fld Engr Regt 1 0 November 1952
Corporal J.R. WILLIAMS 20 1 Royal Fusiliers 1 0 November 1952
Fusilier R.G. COOPER 1 9 1 Royal Fusiliers 1 1 November 1952
Fusilier B.M. TULL 20 1 Royal Fusiliers 11 November 1952
Lance Corporal J.F. SALMON 20 1 Royal Fusiliers 12 November 1952
Fusilier R.W. STEVENS 1 9 1 Royal Fusiliers 12 November 1952
Fusilier P.J. WOOSTER 1 9 1 Royal Fusiliers 12 November 1952
Craftsman i.T. GLASS 19 R.E.M.E. 16 Infantry Workshop 14 November 1952
Corporal B.O. SMITH 28 5 R. Inniskilling D.G. 'B' Squadron 15 November 1952
Private R. DEANS 21 1 Black Watch 16 November 1952
Private J.K. FARQUHAR 1 9 1 Black Watch 16 November 1952
Corporal L.E. FORD MM 22 Royal Engineers 1 Tp 55 Field Sqn t 16 November 1952
C/Sergeant A. PAMSAY 32 1 Black Watch 17 November 1952
Lance Corporal T.G. PHILIP 21 1 Black Watch 18 November 1952
Private J. EVANS 1 9 1 King's 18 November 1952
Sergeant T. CAWLEY 31 Royal Artillery 61 Light Regt 18 November 1952
Lieutenant R. NEVILL-JONES 27 Royal Navy HMS Glory 801 Sqn 18 November 1952
Petty Officer Ammun. V.V. COLMAN 32 Royal Navy HMS Glory 18 November 1952
Lance Corporal D.D. BLAIR 2 1 1 Black Watch 19 November 1952
t 28 Field Engineer Regiment
 

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